Chuck Norris

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My wife, Gena, and I discovered this past week that in her small mountain hometown in Plumas County, California, our pastor's church was kicked out of the county building it had been renting for Sunday church services. What's disgusting is that the eviction is engulfed in political moves to stop the church from meeting there.


Democrats are the masters of deceptive persuasion, meaning they will take our attention off something they have really screwed up and put it on something that's not quite so bad. And chief among those masters is he who resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington, D.C.

For example, let's look at the bumbling idiot Jonathan Gruber, who has repeatedly said that the key for passing Obamacare was the stupidity of the American people.


While many in the nation, from Oakland to New York, rally in protest over the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, I keep wondering: What about the good cops? As with our military personnel, we are often quick to hang the allegedly corrupt but slow to honor those who serve honestly to protect.

According to the nonprofit National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, there are more than 900,000 of them who are serving in the United States; about 12 percent are women. 


For days, nearly every news media outlet has been consumed with the Ferguson fallout. From coast to coast, pundits and populations have been debating the efficacy of justice and demonstrations. But maybe a true solution for Ferguson — and every other social skirmish like it — can only be found in changing the narrative. I think I found it — or him — at Pearl Harbor, and just in time for its 73rd anniversary. 

You know the history. On a quiet Sunday morning, Dec. 7, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on U.S. military bases on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. Two waves of 353 fighter planes hit military installments. The first was at Pacific Naval Air Base, destroying or crippling 36 seaplanes and killing or wounding 84 Americans. Seven minutes later, the Japanese hit Pearl Harbor, where 96 U.S. warships were anchored. All eight battleships of the U.S. Pacific Fleet were sunk or badly damaged. Amazingly, all of America's aircraft carriers were untouched. One hundred eighty-eight U.S. aircraft were destroyed. Of the 2,335 Americans killed, 1,102 were aboard the USS Arizona. 


Last week, when "Fox & Friends" highlighted my most recent column, titled "Neutering Religious Holidays," liberals came out of the woodwork to try to defend President Barack Obama's record. So I decided to do a little research and see just how spiritual his past Thanksgiving addresses have been and compare them with the thoughts of our founding president, George Washington.

In 2013, Obama's Thanksgiving address didn't give a single mention of the Pilgrims, their Christian devotion or thanks to God. He did, however, share his gratitude for the Native Americans and their "generosity during that first Thanksgiving." He gave a litany of "we give thanks" lines, but none of them included faith.


Folks, our country is heading down a slippery slope. We have to stop it before it is too late.

We haven't even hit Thanksgiving, and already the war on Christmas is underway. This time, one of the largest public school systems in the U.S. is eliminating every mention of religious holidays on its official calendar. 


Vice President Joe Biden was exactly right when he said as he campaigned in Iowa on Oct. 27, "Folks, this election is even more important than the two elections you elected Barack and me." With President Obama's approval rating tanking to 38 percent in September, I can understand why Biden is shaking in his boots.

The fact is that this election can serve for the 6 in 10 voters who are disappointed with the administration as a mega-loudspeaker and overarching referendum. As a way of showing the potential power of that vote, I want to share what America's founders told us.


First, the mayor of Houston flagrantly violated clergy's First Amendment rights, when she subpoenaed sermons, and she still refuses to rescind her mandate. And now California government officials are forcing churches and other faith-based organizations to fund abortions. What's next?


So, here we are roughly 500 days after the IRS was caught red-handed using fear and intimidation to target and wage war on conservative groups, including tea party patriots, pro-Israel advocates and Christian organizations. And still we the people haven't seen a single email implicating any IRS official.


Rush Limbaugh was right in saying that Attorney General Eric Holder's resignation is not in any way a simple bon voyage. Rather, it is a deliberate ploy to maneuver him into an even greater place of influence, possibly even the Supreme Court.


After 5 1/2 bumpy years of controversial service, the besieged but bolstered attorney general, Eric Holder, resigned. But is this close friend and confidant of President Barack Obama's really stepping down for some benign reason at a critical time for our country, or is there a sinister and strategic plan behind it all?


In 2008, Americans appointed a president they expected to unify the country, lift the oppressed and restore America's economy and relations in the world. But almost halfway through his second term in office, Americans are more polarized, and the oppressed are more hamstrung. And our country is more unstable than ever among the global community; Iraq is only symptomatic of the greater problem.

But a single professional review of Obama's personality profile could have shown us exactly what was in store for us with his leadership style.


I'm not a psychologist, but I'm intrigued by the work of those who study the mind and behavior, especially when it accurately explains why people do what they do — or can't do what they would like or are expected to do. Case in point, President Barack Obama.

In 2008, I wrote a column titled "A Personality Profile of Barack Obama's Leadership." The warnings of mental health professionals then have come to fruition today. And other brain and personality experts, many of whom cast their votes for Obama at the ballot box, have since learned the nation appointed a man to the highest position in the land who cannot lead in or out of crisis, especially in the face of opposing forces.


Forty-five years ago, there was a day like few others that rallied Americans and changed America forever. Yet I could find but one or two news stories about that momentous occasion and triumph. Do you remember what it was? It's the type of event that America needs now, maybe more than ever before.

If you're old enough, you remember July 20, 1969, when 123 million of roughly 200 million Americans were riveted to their televisions, watching astronaut Neil Armstrong 240,000 miles from Earth. As he stepped off the Eagle — the lunar landing module — to become the first human to walk on the moon, Armstrong's words were heard by over a billion people around the globe: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."


Most everyone knows about America's 1776 Declaration of Independence. But did you know that on July 6 a year earlier, Congress initiated a Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms?

It's true. According to History, on July 6, 1775, just a day after our Founding Fathers issued their Olive Branch Petition to King George III, Congress gave just reason for taking up arms against Great Britain. In the declaration, they wrote they would rather "die freemen rather than to live slaves."


As most kids are screaming "School's out for summer," 18-year-old high-school student Andrew Lampart is still trying to figure out why his school's Internet service blocked him from gathering conservative facts for his side of the argument on his school debate team.

Andrew told Fox News, "I knew it was important to get facts for both sides of the case." But when he tried to do an Internet search of conservative views, he was prevented at every turn.


Editor's Note: This was sent to the publishing syndicate as a two-parter. We have combined both parts into this one column post.

I have four colossal disagreements with how President Barack Obama cut the deal for the prisoner swap of five senior Taliban leaders for U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl; the former, the White House itself admits, could "absolutely" rejoin terrorist cells.

Sure, I have far more than four issues with how it all went down — for example, the absolute avoidance and disregard of constitutional submission and congressional consent. But this administration seems to have little regard for proper protocol with anything, so I'm going to focus here on a few different angles of argument.


On Valentine's Day 2013, the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families took into emergency custody then-14-year-old Justina Pelletier because the doctors at Tufts Medical Center and doctors at Boston Children's Hospital collided over the diagnosis of her rare medical condition. But when medical egos and battles lead to a child's being torn from her parents by judges ruling on dubious grounds, isn't it time to confess that something is seriously askew in society and even under the stethoscope?

Fox News recently summarized the 15-month custody catastrophe by explaining that Tufts was originally treating Justina for a rare mitochondrial disease affecting cellular energy production. When gastrointestinal problems complicated her ailments, Tufts' doctors referred her to Boston Children's Hospital. But those doctors diagnosed her instead with somatoform disorder — a psychological condition that has no known physical origin.


The Obama administration continues to suppress documents that could finally explain why U.S. officials lied to the world that the September 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, occurred as a protest over an American-made anti-Muslim video. And the families and friends of the four brave Americans murdered there continue to suffer without answers, reasons or justice. Is there not a shred of heart left in Washington?

USA Today explained this past week how the watchdog group Judicial Watch blew the whistle on the White House's withholding of documents and obtained a letter from the U.S. Department of Justice under the Freedom of Information Act. In it, the Justice Department tries to justify its withholding of further Benghazi documents.


A year ago, I wrote a two-part series titled "My Mom's Advice for America." There's no better time than now — between my mother's 93rd birthday (May 4) and Mother's Day (May 11) — to talk about her mother's advice, which my mother recorded in her autobiography, "Acts of Kindness: My Story."

Last week, I started by echoing what my mom said about my grandmother's family values. Both of their models still stand as beacons of light, pointing the way America and American families need to go.