Brad Wilmouth

Contributing Writer


Brad Wilmouth is a former Media Research Center news analyst and an alumnus of the University of Virginia.

Latest from Brad Wilmouth

On Thursday's CNN Tonight, during a discussion of President Barack Obama allegedly being "scandal-free" for eight years, CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley went furthest over the top as he gushed over Obama being "almost unimpeachable" like President Dwight Eisenhower. He also predicted that, in contrast with Donald Trump presiding over a "bog," Obama will go down in history as having the "highest" in ethics "up there with some of our really great American leaders."


In a Tuesday article titled, "The House unceremoniously yanks down a student's artwork," the Washington Post editorial board condemns the removal of an incendiary painting from a U.S. Capitol hallway portraying police officers as animals attacking blacks, with the Post hyperbolically dubbing the move as "vigilante censorship," and tying the "unseemly stampede" and "sad precedent" of its removal to the "alt-right."


On Wednesday's Erin Burnett Outfront on CNN, host Erin Burnett seemed taken aback over Education secretary nominee Betsy DeVos, during her confirmation hearing, being open to relaxing gun laws to allow local governments to set their own policies for schools, as the CNN host gave a sympathetic forum to liberal Connecticut Senator and gun control advocate Chris Murphy to fret over the possibility of teachers being allowed to have guns. Without pushback from Burnett, Senator Murphy pretended that he was speaking for "almost every parent in this country" in finding her pro-gun comments frightening.


Appearing as a guest on Wednesday's New Day on CNN, Georgetown University professor and former MSNBC analyst Michael Eric Dyson likened police actions against black Americans to terrorism as CNN's Chris Cuomo argued that many voters were motivated to vote for Donald Trump by non-race-related issues like terrorism from ISIS.  Dyson griped: "Color-neutral and ISIS? Many African-American people said, 'Look, we were introduced to terror long before 9/11. The vicious police forces of America that have victimized us and the way in which white supremacy operated.'"


In a pre-recorded interview which aired on Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, host Chuck Todd actually brought up the possibility of a President Donald Trump being impeached by Congress in the near future as he discussed Democratic Rep. John Lewis's assertion that he would not view Trump as a "legitimate" President.

 


Appearing as a guest on Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, liberal talk radio host Joe Madison attacked President-elect Donald Trump as someone who "couldn't shine John Lewis's shoes" during a discussion of Trump's Twitter response to the Democratic congressman's view that his presidency would not be "legitimate." The long-time recurring guest, who has a history of making snide attacks against conservatives, also declared that "we need to put this man in his place."


Appearing as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy, allegedly conservative Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin sounded like just one more liberal analyst on top of the other four liberals already on the panel as she could only find negative things to say about Republican efforts to repeal ObamaCare, and even fretted over the move to defund Planned Parenthood.


A week after filing a report focused on a "lifelong conservative" who supports ObamaCare and worries about losing health insurance if it is repealed, CNN medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta on Friday went in the other direction as he filed a report predominantly about the views of physicians who make a case against ObamaCare and complain that it has harmed the system.

Although the segment, which aired on CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, was partially balanced out by including the views of doctors who oppose a repeal, the piece focused mainly on one physician, Dr. Brian Hill, who left his practice because of ObamaCare to work for a hospital which charges substantially more for services he used to provide for less, and informed viewers of surveys finding physicians more likely than not to hold negative views toward the program's effect.


Appearing as a panel member on Tuesday's CNN Tonight to discuss President-elect Donald Trump's press conference in which he accused CNN and BuzzFeed of peddling "fake news," CNN senior media correspondent Brian Stelter whined about the term "fake news" being "misused" and "exploited" by "partisans on the left and right" as he declared that he agrees with the Washington Post's Margaret Sullivan that "it's time to retire the term." 


As Tuesday's New Day devoted a segment to the Congressional Black Caucus planning on hanging up a painting in a Capitol Building hallway in which a congressional art competition winner depicted police officers as pigs, CNN co-host Alisyn Camerota at one point wondered if guest Ben Ferguson was being "politically correct" by arguing that the painting should not be displayed publicly.

After co-host Chris Cuomo set up the segment by recalling that California Republican Rep. Duncan Hunter had removed the painting and sent it to Missouri Democratic Rep. Emanuel Cleaver because the panting was from his district, leading CBC members to plan on getting together and hanging it back up, the right-leaning Ferguson argued against handing the painting in a public hallway, although he found it acceptable for the Congressman to display it inside his own personal office if he wished.


In a Saturday article titled, "Virginia's Latest Attempt to Marginalize Minorities," the Washington Post editorial board slams Virginia Republican Delegate Robert Marshall for proposing a bathroom bill similar to that in North Carolina that would bar men from using women's restrooms. As it wrongly claims that there are no examples in Virginia of men pretending to be women to victimize them in such public places, the article even likens the "obnoxious" legislation to racism in the Jim Crow South and suggests that some Republicans would support it because they like "marginalizing minorities."


On Friday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, host Costello devoted a four-minute segment to a pair of liberal women who are hoping to get 200,000 women to march in D.C. on Donald Trump's first day in office as President  Even though the group is obviously left-wing, not only were there no ideological labels used to describe their views, but they were even allowed to promote themselves as if they were nonpartisan as the CNN host introduced them as not belonging "to any political group."


Once Congress came into session and the process of planning for an ObamaCare repeal actually began, it didn't take long for CNN to try to undermine the effort by finding individual examples of Republicans to highlight who support ObamaCare in spite of voting for Donald Trump and presumably taking a conservative view on other issues.


As Thursday's CNN New Day covered the horrendous story of a white special needs man being tortured by four black teens in Chicago while they made anti-white and anti-Donald Trump taunts and live streamed the assault on Facebook, CNN co-host Alisyn Camerota fretted that "right-wing websites" like Breitbart, The Blaze, and Townhall are going too far in making the story "political."


Appearing as a panel member on Tuesday's CNN Tonight, CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley repeated as if were fact the claim that Ronald Reagan's campaign in 1980 pressed the Iranian government to delay the release of the Americans held hostage to hurt President Jimmy Carter's reelection chances. Neither host Don Lemon nor fellow CNN presidential historian Timothy Naftali noted that a Democratic Congress failed to find evidence of such illicit activity when they investigated the October Surprise conspiracy theory in the early 1990s. Brinkley: "Ronald Reagan was taking on Jimmy Carter, and there was the October Surprise meeting keeping the hostages in Iran. William Casey, people in the Reagan administration were interfering with foreign policy then saying, 'Keep the hostages in until after the election.' So it has happened before."


On Tuesday's CNN Tonight, host Don Lemon cued up author Michael Higginbothum to claim that there was "racial amnesia" and a "Jim Crow mentality" around white voters being willing to vote for Donald Trump in spite of him using "a lot of racial rhetoric" in the campaign. Higginbothum -- author of Ghosts of Jim Crow -- went on to liken modern times to the era after Reconstruction when former Confederates celebrated the Ku Klux Klan and denied that slavery was primarily to blame for the American Civil War.


On Monday's CBS Evening News, in a report devoted to the increased rates of homicide in Chicago, correspondent Jericka Duncan suggested a link to the police making fewer stops after being scrutinized over the police shooting death of Laquan McDonald in 2014. But, unlike the previous night's report on CBS 60 Minutes by correspondent Bill Whitaker, Duncan's piece did not mention that the Chicago police superintendent blamed less aggressive policing on lawsuit threats by the American Civil Liberties Union that have led to the police facing more restrictions on when to make contact with criminal suspects.


On Monday's New Day on CNN, as the RNC's Sean Spicer complained about Senate Democrats planning to obstruct some of President-elect Donald Trump's cabinet nominees, co-host Alisyn Camerota incorrectly recalled that Republican Senator Mitch McConnell stated that his goal was to make Barack Obama a "one-term president" before Obama was even sworn in, and disputed Spicer's claim to the contrary that it was "a year after he got into office." Camerota: "I think your timeline might be wrong. I will check that, Sean, because I think it was right when President Obama was elected..."


On Thursday's New Day on CNN, during a segment pitting liberal CNN political commentator Peter Beinart against former CIA director James Woolsey, Beinart bristled at Woolsey's warnings that Jews trying to live in a Palestinian Arab state would be in grave danger of being attacked and killed as he asserted that it was a "racist claim" for the former CIA director to make. Beinart found comfort that "many" Palestinians do not kill Jews as he admitted that "some" do. Beinart: "The claim that Palestinians would inevitably kill Jews in the West Bank, I have  I have Jewish friends, Israelis who live in the West Bank. It's frankly a racist claim to suggest that Palestinians would inherently kill Jews. That's -- some Palestinians commit terrorism and many don't."

 


It would be a good idea for journalists to be wary of any anti-Israel or left-leaning guests making claims about how much foreign aid the U.S. grants Israel each year, since on two occasions just Wednesday, CNN guests managed to pass off wildly overstated claims about how much the U.S. spends in supporting the Jewish state and only liberal democracy in the Middle East. On CNN's Wolf show, pro-Palestinian activist Diana Buttu claimed that Israel gets $38 billion a year. In reality, Israel receives about $3 billion a year.