The First Amendment to our Constitution was proposed by the 1788 Virginia ratification convention during its narrow 89 to 79 vote to ratify the Constitution. Virginia's resolution held that the free exercise of religion, right to assembly and free speech could not be canceled, abridged or restrained. These Madisonian principles were eventually ratified by the states on March 1, 1792.



The Thursday Social Media Summit at the White House will rally supporters of free speech. Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.), who plans to attend the summit, has commented that he is “concerned there are people who work at the major technology platforms who want to put their thumb on the scale.” “All we want is a fair fight,” said Gaetz. “I guess in a sense if highlighting experiences and instances of bias will result in fewer moderations that present as bias, all the better.”



In a press release on July 8, Instagram announced a new content policy designed to stop “hate speech.” Users will be warned when they post a comment or an update that might be considered “offensive.” An algorithm would monitor content before posting  



To any student of history, or anyone who ever took an American history class, the idea that the American flag with 13 stars was a symbol of racism and slavery was nonsense. But CBS Evening News and NBC Nightly News bought into the accusation without even a second thought and even pushed the lunacy.



The Washington Post doesn’t like President Trump, and it really doesn’t like his tweets. So it’s hardly surprising the Post’s editorial board would love a new Twitter policy that potentially could silence -- or at least quiet -- Trump’s account. A June 29 editorial recalls last year  when Trump tweeted about the firing of former aide Omarosa Manigault Newman and called her a “lowlife.”



Eric Cochran worked at Pinterest for nearly two years, creating open-source code for a variety of apps. But with a June 24 op-ed in Newsweek, he’s exposing the censorship skeletons in the platform’s closet. Cochran says he was an idealist who “wanted to do good” with the technology he created. “I thought Pinterest could be different from its sibling tech giants. I hoped Pinterest might be a tech company that respected its users and was honest with them.”



On Monday morning, New Day aired a portion of an interview between CNN Newsroom anchor Poppy Harlow and Google’s CEO Sundar Pinchai. They discussed everything from China to data privacy, but Harlow seemed intent to focus on YouTube’s policies on “hate speech.”



It's starting to look like the recent demonetization of Steven Crowder's Louder With Crowder YouTube channel was used as an excuse to institute an already planned crackdown on free speech on that platform. Who is the source for this information? Why, the CEO of Google himself, Sundar Pichai, who announced such a crackdown in during an Axios on HBO interview which was recorded BEFORE the demonetization of Crowder's channel because he was charged with offending a Vox writer.



Former Facebook CSO Alex Stamos joined MSNBC Live host Stephanie Ruhle on Thursday to discuss Facebook's response, or lack of a response, to doctored or misleading videos. Ruhle was particularly upset that misleading videos, such as the Nancy Pelosi one from a few weeks ago, was not removed and even wondered what the government could do about.



Tuesday marked the 30-year anniversary of the bloody Tiananmen Square massacre, when the Chinese government slaughtered upwards of thousands of student protesters demanding democracy. In true Orwellian fashion, the Chinese government had effectively erased it from their history and arrested a CBS News crew for showing pictures of the massacre to young Chinese citizens. Meanwhile, outlets in the U.S. claim President Trump was the Orwellian one and the danger to press freedom.



Tech companies have been strangely silent on the subject of Chinese censorship. But one reason for their silence might be the millions Chinese companies have invested in these platforms. In a May 30 podcast with the Harvard Business Review, Reddit COO Jen Wong sang the praises of the company’s newest investor, Chinese tech company Tencent. She told the Review that Tencent was “a really impressive company” who had “enormous success.” However, she failed to mention why Tencent would be a controversial investor -- as the builders of China’s infamous Great Firewall of Censorship.



It is becoming likely that a controversial star-spangled banner in North Carolina will continue to wave over Gander RV in Statesville. The city said that its leaders will consider amending an ordinance regulating the size of flags flying in a highway business zone, according to WSOC TV. Gander RV and Camping World CEO Marcus Lemonis steadfastly refused to comply with city orders to take the flag down and was even willing to go to jail. Lemonis is also the star of CNBC’s The Profit.