In the wake of Facebook apparently discovering and shutting down Russian troll and disinformation pages, MSNBC anchor Stephanie Ruhle has turned to an authoritarian solution. On the 11th Hour with Brian Williams Wednesday night, Ruhle said, “I'm not going to feel bad for Mark Zuckerberg. This is the world he created, and maybe it's a Frankenstein. Maybe he created a monster,” of the social media site. She continued: “And while it's our gargantuan problem, Facebook has a gargantuan amount of money to address this.” 



MSNBC host Nicole Wallace got really sweaty Wednesday afternoon after watching a soundbite of Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders supporting all Americans right to free speech. The clip enraged Wallace so much that she flipped out and forever banned any more soundbites of the Press Secretary from being shown on her show.



Google is reportedly considering launching a search engine in China in compliance with censorship demands by the government, according to a report in The Intercept. The Intercept report claims project Dragonfly has been around since last year, although “knowledge about Dragonfly has been restricted to just a few hundred members.” An alleged insider, however, told The Intercept the search engine will block results related to “human rights, democracy, religion, and peaceful protest.”

 


On Tuesday, Facebook announced that it removed 32 profiles and pages that it suspected “coordinated inauthentic behavior” on the site. Of those 32 pages, Facebook said the most popular pages were ones such as “Resisters,” “Aztlan Warriors,” and “Black Elevation,” some of which promoted liberal political narratives.
 



Once again, Missouri Republican congressional candidate Austin Peterson has fallen afoul of Twitter. This time it was for a simple joke.



In recent days, the stock prices for major social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter have taken truly massive hits, which were partly driven by the issue of censoring conservative political speech. Last week, Facebook took a colossal $120 billion stock hit (which was the largest ever in history). And during an appearance on the Fox Business Network’s After the Bell, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell predicted that such hits were “going to get worse.”



InfoWars founder Alex Jones is currently in the midst of a 30-day Facebook suspension for allegedly violating the site’s rules against “bullying” and “hate speech.” It has even resulted in surprising support from Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas). Jones has said extreme and untrue things, such as falsely asserting that the shooting of six-year-old kids at Sandy Hook was fake. 

 


The liberal media love to pretend that their news cycles are dictated entirely by President Trump’s Twitter feed. It’s their number one excuse when average Americans complain they’re not covering other and arguably more important topics. But oh how quickly their fascination with his account fades when he mentions something they rather keep hidden. For Thursday’s evening broadcasts on ABC, CBS, and NBC (as well as on Spanish-language Univision and Telemundo) it was Twitter allegedly “shadow banning” conservative accounts.



Following a report from Gizmodo, left-wing news site Vice News has accused Twitter of “shadow banning” right-wing personalities, politicians, and political pundits. In a piece, Vice proclaimed in the headline, “Twitter is ‘shadow banning’ prominent Republicans like the RNC chair and Trump Jr.’s spokesman.” According to the report, searches for Republican Party chair Ronna McDaniel, Rep. Mark Meadows (R-NC), Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), and Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) all do not automatically fill into the search bar when users begin to look up their accounts if they do not follow those accounts. The search also reportedly fails to list the verified account for Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA).



Facebook admitted it made a “mistake” when it rejected the pro-gun advertisement posted by a Republican running for agricultural commissioner in Florida. State Rep. Matt Caldwell’s 15-second advertisement features him skeet shooting and saying, “I like guns. I love the Second Amendment. And I support our president. That’s why I’m endorsed by the NRA.”



Starting in August, anyone with access to a 3D printer can yet again download the blueprints to print their own firearms at home. In response, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America launched an online campaign to “#StopDownloadableGuns.”



Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey responded to criticism of the site and suggested that the company might be able to “determine credible voices per topic in real-time.” Dorsey was answering complaints from New York Times White House correspondent Maggie Haberman who faulted “that everyone is treated as equally expert on various topics.”