By Nicholas Fondacaro | March 21, 2017 | 12:44 AM EDT

Following the release of President Donald Trump’s new federal budget last week, the liberal media was up in arms that Trump would dare to defund the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. On Sunday, a CNN anchor asked the MRC’s Dan Gainor if it was “conservative revenge.” But The Washington Post on Monday had an even more ridiculous explanation. “Trump wants to defund PBS. ‘Sesame Street’ brutally parodied him for decades,” read the headline to an arts and entertainment article by Avi Selk. 

By Lindsay Kornick | March 19, 2017 | 11:56 PM EDT

Man, Showtime’s Homeland really doesn’t like Alex Jones or anyone who supports him. This week’s episode marks not only the third time the character based on him was a plot point but the second time he’s been saddled with the “fake news” label, this time with the help of a few thousand fake social media accounts.

By Kyle Drennen | March 17, 2017 | 4:22 PM EDT

Appearing on the 11 a.m. ET hour of MSNBC on Thursday, California Democratic Congressman Ted Lieu laughably told viewers of the left-wing network: “The best way to oppose fake news is for people to watch outlets like MSNBC, where you report real news all the time.”

By Tom Blumer | March 14, 2017 | 4:17 PM EDT

The outcome of the Michael Brown saga in Ferguson, Missouri, which began in August 2014, reached a climax in November 2014 when a grand jury did not indict police officer Darren Wilson, and ended with a whimper in March 2015 when the Justice Department saw no basis for bringing civil rights charges, infuriated the left. So it seemed inevitable that a conspiracy theory would emerge attempting to rehabilitate Brown's reputation while planting doubt about the circumstances leading to his death — and one just has.

By Tom Blumer | March 13, 2017 | 4:20 PM EDT

Demonstrating that the left will risk the reputation and credibility of virtually any of its cherished institutions in the name of defending the biased establishment press against its center-right competitors, the Harvard Library has published "Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda," a "research Guide" purporting to offer "a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it." 

By Tom Blumer | March 11, 2017 | 8:35 PM EST

In a dispatch accusing the Trump administration of hypocrisy in expressing pleasure over Friday's jobs report from the government's Bureau of Labor Statistics, Associated Press reporters Jill Colvin and Christopher Rugaber, with additional assistance from Jonathan Lemire, either betrayed an amazing collective level of ignorance about what a households is, or were so blinded by the need to criticize Donald Trump that they didn't see how ridiculous they made themselves and their wire service look. The trio's error, shared by their editors if such people even exist any more, is so obvious that one simply has to believe that it's the latter.

By P.J. Gladnick | March 10, 2017 | 9:50 PM EST

When reading the series of charts containing a weird labyrinth of rather tenuous connections published in the March/April edition of Politico Magazine, it is hard not to channel Inspector Jacques Clouseau trying to connect the unrelated dots to make the case that was always far off the mark. The Politico dots on the series of seven elaborate charts are chock full of oligarchs, both Russian and Ukrainian, a beauty contest, a mixed martial artist, a dossier that no one has seen, a couple of Russian energy giants not to be confused with a regular Russian oil company, and, to top it off, a mystery person. This is the laughable evidence presented by reporter Michael Crowley to desperately give the Trump-Russia fake news story an aura of validity despite no proof.

By P.J. Gladnick | March 9, 2017 | 2:57 PM EST

Now that the Trump-Russia fake news story is crumbling as Rolling Stone writer Matt Taibbi warned liberals, how can the mainstream media continue to report on this fact-free topic? Simple. By invoking masters of fiction in the form of spy novelists. Therefore it is appropriate that Associated Press writer Hillel Italie consulted several of those fiction writers to comment on fake news fiction.

By P.J. Gladnick | March 8, 2017 | 7:17 PM EST

Be very careful Democrats and your mainstream media allies. The fake news story about collusion between the Donald Trump campaign and Russia is a minefield that could destroy your credibility even beyond conservative skeptics who already don't believe you. So who is making this warning? One of the usual "rightwing" sources? Nope. The warning comes from the very very liberal Matt Taibbi and if you doubt his leftwing bonafides you can verify it right here on NewsBusters. Taibbi is very worried about the Trump-Russia story blowing up in the faces of the left as you can see in his March 8 Rolling Stone article, Why the Russia Story Is a Minefield for Democrats and the Media:

By P.J. Gladnick | March 5, 2017 | 3:00 PM EST

Rolling Stone published a February 28 story which featured North Carolina state senator Jeff Jackson (D) who vociferously blamed President Trump for the Jewish community center bomb threats around the nation. Bad timing for him because just three days later, on Friday, a suspect was arrested for the JCC threats. Very inconveniently for Jackson and many liberals the suspect, Juan Thompson, turned out to be an anti-Trump leftist. So what was the reaction of Jackson and the Rolling Stone? Contrition? An apology? Naw. Complete silence. 

By P.J. Gladnick | March 4, 2017 | 2:09 PM EST

"False news." That accusation is definitely not appreciated by CNN. And it seems to bother them even more when that claim is made by a foreign official. In this case it was made on March 2 by Russian Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Maria Zakharova in response to accusations that the Russian ambassador to the United States is a spy master. Zakharova forcefully told CNN by name to stop spreading false news.

By Tom Blumer | March 2, 2017 | 5:17 PM EST

With so much fake news published and broadcast in the establishment press, it apparently was only a matter of time before those who run these organizations would start making brazenly false claims about the size of their audience. The opening sentence of a March 1 NBC news press release claimed that it had the largest combined audience of any news organization during President Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress — and "forgot" to combine Fox's broadcast network audience with that of Fox News.