This week, liberal journalists announce their disdain for the "troll-like" conservative presidential candidate Ted Cruz, who "operates below the level of human life," while USA Today says socialist Bernie Sanders is the "most Christian candidate" in the race. Also: reporters condemn the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's conservative philosophy, while playing the race card when it comes to filling his Supreme Court seat, with one New York Times editorial writer tweeting: "In a nation built on slavery, white men propose denying the first black President his Constitutional right to name Supreme Court nominee."


On Friday, Media Research Center Research Director Rich Noyes targeted PBS on Fox Business Network's Risk and Reward over their failure to ask Hillary Clinton about her ongoing e-mail scandal at their Democratic presidential debate on Thursday. Noyes pointed out that "the far-left MSNBC did ask Hillary Clinton about this at their debate last week. Very gently, they said, can you reassure Democratic voters that this won't be a problem? PBS won't even go as far as MSNBC in bringing this issue before people vote. It's amazing."


After having started off with a number of surprisingly solid questions in Thursday’s PBS NewsHour Democratic Debate, co-moderator Gwen Ifill wondered to socialist Senator Bernie Sanders if he’s concerned that he “will be the instrument of thwarting history” if he defeats Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primary as part of her second campaign to be the first female president.


Any would-be Republican presidential candidate who had--hanging around his neck--all the scandals and investigations that surround Hillary Clinton, would likely not have the chutzpah to throw his hat into the ring. He'd know that the MSM would create such a toxic environment that his candidacy would never have a chance of getting off the ground. 

And so it is somewhere between amusing and outrageous to hear Mark Halperin claim, as he did on today's With All Due Respect, that the press is "biased against" Hillary Clinton. Granted, Halperin did so in the context of discussing this evening's Dem debate between Hillary and Bernie Sanders. As between those two, might the MSM lean towards Sanders, as the further-left candidate? Could be. But if Hillary wins the nomination, does Halperin doubt that the press will be pulling for Clinton against the Republican? Some bias!


Barack Obama wanted 15 minutes of air time on Sunday night, the most heavily watched night of the week, to speak to the nation about the San Bernardino shooting. It was appropriate for the president to request it, and for the networks to grant it, but everyone knew he would say nothing new of substance because on the matter of Islamic terrorism, he never does.

And he didn’t. And in so not doing, he wowed the press again. The stenographers underlined his good intentions.


Appearing as a panel member on CBS's Face the Nation on Sunday, PBS host Gwen Ifill made a negative characterization of GOP presidential candidates' reactions to recent terrorist attacks as she declared that, "For Republicans, it's going to be a variation of what we've seen so far, which is, 'How can we be more alarmist than the last guy?'"

She then moved to take jabs at GOPers Chris Christie and Donald Trump as she suggested that the discussion was moving away from, "What can you really do about it?"


While NBC’s Lester Holt was wondering before President Obama’s speech Sunday night if it would “be a defining moment for this presidency,” his counterparts on ABC and PBS picked up where he left off afterward by enthusiastically praising how “struck” they were by “a stern and direct” Obama “laying out" what Obama called "a strong and smart strategy” to deal with terrorism.


Appearing on NBC’s Meet the Press Sunday, PBS NewsHour co-anchor Gwen Ifill acted as a Democratic Party spokesperson when she hit Ben Carson for accusing the media of having a double standard in covering his personal biography.  

 


National Public Radio and the Public Broadcasting Service have attempted on Fridays to run a “Week in Politics” segment and PBS even has a long-standing show called Washington Week. But on Friday, all these programs discussed a “week” utterly without any analysis of the 2015 elections.

Try to imagine how the media would have covered it if the transgender “equal rights” initiative won in Houston, pot was legalized in Ohio, Kentucky elected another Democrat governor, and the state senate went Democrat in Virginia. Wouldn’t that be brought to bear on how it might affect the presidential race in 2016 and the march of liberal inevitability? But conservatives won, so who has any time on a taxpayer-funded outlet?


On Thursday, October 22, 2015, President Barack Obama signed a veto message of the National Defense Authorization Act. The NDAA establishes budgets and policies for the Defense Department, and in the last 53 years it has only been vetoed four times. Coverage of the veto signing and its significance has been rather dismal despite Obama summoning the White House press for a public signing. ABC and NBC aired nothing. Here are the brief mentions the other networks offered on the funding for our troops and their salaries, as well as benefits and training. CNN, PBS, and CBS provided brief statements on the NDAA and its planned veto by the President. Meanwhile, Fox News devoted a portion of time greater than the other networks combined.


The ombudsman for PBS on Thursday chastised anchor Gwen Ifill for mocking Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Twitter. After it became clear that the Senate could not override a presidential veto of the Iran deal, Ifill tweeted, "Take that, Bibi." PBS Ombudsman Michael Gelter derided the comments by the NewsHour host as "inexcusable." 


Despite most Americans and members of Congress being opposed to President Obama’s nuclear deal with Iran, on Wednesday, the press proclaimed that the White House eking out just enough Democrats to sustain a veto against legislation stopping the deal was a “major victory” for the commander-in-chief.