Matthew Balan

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Contributing Writer


Matthew Balan was a news analyst at Media Research Center from February 2007 until February 2017. Previously, he worked for the Heritage Foundation from 2003 until 2006, and for Human Life International in 2006. He is an alumnus of the University of Delaware.

Latest from Matthew Balan

On Monday, NPR promoted a demonstration of 200 ObamaCare supporters, who gathered in a county in Texas where President Donald Trump almost got 80 percent of the popular vote. Despite this statistic, the public radio outlet couldn't find any conservatives for their report on All Things Considered. All but one of the sound bites during the segment came from ObamaCare backers. The remaing clip came from a libertarian, who watched the demonstration from his workplace.


USA Today played up the Supreme Court's decision on Monday to hear the case of a bakery owner in Colorado who refused to participate in same-sex couple's wedding ceremony by baking the pair a cake. The newspaper spun the judicial branch's move in the lead sentence of their Monday article: "The Supreme Court agreed Monday to reopen the national debate over same-sex marriage." The publication also forwarded this slanted interpretation in a Monday post on their Twitter account.


NPR blatantly slanted a story against a Catholic bishop in Illinois who recently instructed his priests to deny the Eucharist, last rites, and funerals decree with quotes from four activists who dissent against the Catholic Church's teachings on sexuality. While the article included excerpts from the cleric's document, as well as from a statement from his diocese, they failed to interview anyone conservative or orthodox to provide more balance to the four dissenters.


On Friday, Slate's Christina Cauterucci‏ bewailed a new iPhone app released by a pro-life organization as a "discomfiting invasion of privacy or a gigantic lie." The program helps pro-life activists pray for pregnant women who are considering abortion. Cauterucci‏ used the app as a jumping-off point to condemn the existence of crisis pregnancy centers and lament the New York Times' decision to publish two pro-life opinion pieces in 2017.


TBS's Samantha Bee unleashed against her longstanding nemesis, the Catholic Church, during a segment on Wednesday's Full Frontal. Bee zeroed on the Church's opposition to a proposed "child victims act," and contended that "if you're an institution that has hurt so many children that paying out civil settlements would make you go bankrupt, maybe you should?" The left-wing "comedian" added, "Anyway, it's fine. It won't. You're sitting on more treasure than Smaug the Dragon [a character in "The Hobbit"], so pay up."


On Thursday, the Associated Press played up the supposed impact of President Donald Trump's decision to the withdraw from the Paris climate accord by underlining that "some island states may not survive through the next 100 years." The wire service touted officials from some of these countries, along with several "experts," who predicted "catastrophic" effects on these nations.


Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR touted how many Muslims in the United Kingdom are blaming British media outlets for the Monday incident where a Welsh man drove his van into a crowd outside a mosque in London. In their view, "the way the media covers Muslims has fueled hatred of their community," as host Kelly McEvers put it.


The broadcast networks morning and evening newscasts, along with the cable news networks, have largely ignored the Tuesday report from Axios's Mike Allen that Hillary Clinton's campaign team blames President Obama for her loss in the 2016 election. Charlie Rose mentioned the revelation in passing on Thursday's CBS This Morning: "You have reports, for example, that the Hillary campaign thought it began with President Obama not doing enough in terms of the Russian hacking."


Wednesday's CBS This Morning turned to liberal attorney David Boies for his take on President Trump's nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court. However, the newscast failed to provide balance by bringing on a conservative legal expert. Boies twice asserted that Gorsuch was "not in...the mainstream of judicial thought." Anchor Norah O'Donnell later gushed over the "so smart" guest.


The Big Three networks' morning newscasts on Tuesday forwarded the same language about two of President Trump's possible Supreme Court picks. On CBS This Morning, Jan Crawford labeled Neil Gorsuch and Thomas Hardiman "solid conservatives." ABC's George Stephanopoulos used the same term on GMA, and played up that "either one of these finalists could be picked by any Republican president — both relatively young white men...solid conservatives." NBC's Peter Alexander also zeroed on in the race of the potential nominees on Today: "The President's decision narrowed down to two appeals court judges, both white men."


CNN's New Day on Monday trumpeted Kal Penn's online fundraiser for refugees, and gave him a platform to attack President Trump over his recent executive order on immigration. Penn underlined that "the Women's March was a great example of coming together and standing up against the, sort of, tyranny that we're experiencing right now." The former Obama administration official later cited how his fundraiser was inspired by "the lessons we learned from Barack and Michelle Obama: when they go low, we go high."


CNN's Wolf Blitzer thrice claimed on his early afternoon program on Thursday that diplomatic relations between the United States and Mexico had entered a "crisis", due to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto cancelling his upcoming meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump. Blitzer trumpeted "the breaking news: a major diplomatic rift — a crisis, I dare say — between the United States and Mexico." He later stated that "it sounds like that crisis in U.S.-Mexican relations is going to continue," and emphasized that "clearly, this crisis not going away."


CNN's Van Jones revisited part of his infamous "white-lash" rant during an interview of coal miners in West Virginia on Tuesday's Anderson Cooper 360: "As a Christian couple, how can you support a Donald Trump when you know the fear he strikes into the hearts of American Muslim children; American Latino children? How do you round that circle?" During that Election Night rant, the former Obama administration official touted how he had "Muslim friends who are texting me tonight — saying, should I leave the country? I have families of immigrants that are terrified tonight."


On Monday's Anderson Cooper 360, CNN's Van Jones offered his theory about the controversy over the size of the crowd that attended President Trump's inauguration: "Ordinary leaders rely on the Constitution as a source of their legitimacy. But you get these kind of leaders that have these more authoritarian overtones — it's not the power of our constitution; it's the size of their crowds. The legitimacy doesn't come from these documents. They come from the fact that I represent something." Jones later added, "When you diminish his crowd size, it's...a blow to his sense of legitimacy."


CNN's David Gergen and Martha Pease gushed over the anti-Donald Trump Women's March in a Sunday op-ed for the news network's website: "It was certainly a magic moment -- hundreds of thousands of women pouring hour after hour into the Mall in Washington." Gergen and Pease contended that "Trump may have done something that...even Barack Obama could not do: spark the creation of a progressive movement that massively resists an America that goes backward."


Friday's NBC Nightly News hyped how President Donald Trump supposedly lobbed "verbal grenades" in his inauguration address, as Hallie Jackson put it. Chuck Todd contended that the speech was "shockingly divisive for an inaugural," and quickly added that it was "unnecessarily divisive." Todd later underlined that Trump "insulted almost every living president that was there...which, to me, was so stunning."


During MSNBC's Friday coverage of the inauguration, Chris Matthews and Rachel Maddow played up a report from the Huffington Post claiming that President Trump's transition team requested military hardware for the inaugural parade. Matthews wondered, "Wouldn't that look like a little shades of Pyongyang?" Maddow added, "It would be a little Red Square to do that." Minutes later, Maddow revisited the supposed request for a "Red Square-style show of military force," and lamented, "It's embarrassing — to be the only president with no public service or military experience being the one who wants to most show off the military."


David Gergen and Douglas Brinkley gushed over President Barack Obama during a panel discussion on Wednesday's CNN Tonight. Gergen played up the Democrat's defense of the media during his final press conference, and later claimed that Mr. and Mrs. Obama "didn't have a big scandal...That's very rare." Brinkley touted how "the press/media loves Barack Obama right now," and contended that "what's helping Barack Obama's legacy with the press is Donald Trump....By comparison, he's like St. Augustine up there talking to the flock." USA Today's Kirsten Powers countered by spotlighting the chief executive's hostile actions towards the press.


On Wednesday's New Day, CNN's Chris Cuomo ripped a proposal to let health insurance companies compete across state lines. Cuomo pointed out to Matt Schlapp that Rep. Marsha Blackburn cited "one of my favorite bills — let's open up the state lines, and let all the companies compete....not only do we have some of that in the system already, but there is no proof...that that would guarantee access for everyone." He wondered, "Is that the best answer they have right now?" However, Cuomo left out that Rep. Blackburn also disclosed possible other components of ObamaCare replacements.


Marc Lamont Hill launched an inflammatory attack on another guest on Monday's CNN Tonight as part of a diatribe against Donald Trump. Hill claimed that the President-Elect's meetings with African American celebrities were "demeaning" to blacks: "Bring some people up there with some expertise...don't just bring up people to entertain." The BET News host unleashed after Trump supporter Bruce LeVell defended the billionaire: "It was a bunch of mediocre Negroes being dragged in front of TV as a photo-op for Donald Trump's exploitative campaign against black people. And you are the prime example of that."