By Mark Finkelstein | May 5, 2016 | 8:14 AM EDT

Of everyone in the MSM, Joe Scarborough has been widely seen as the most ardent Trump supporter--starting from the day Donald descended that escalator with Melania. Scarborough would argue he was merely offering dispassionate political analysis--saying that Trump's chances should be taken seriously while others were disdainfully dismissing him. But for those of us who watched Joe day in and day out during the primary season, there seemed to be something much more than green-eyeshade analysis going on. Scarborough revelled in every poll and primary result favorable to Trump.

Which makes Scarborough's statement on today's Morning Joe so strange. Joe first expressed disappointment that yesterday, Trump "stuck by the Muslim ban." Scarborough then proclaimed "I'm never going to vote for a guy that is saying he is going to ban somebody just because of the God they worship." Note to Joe: from the beginning, Trump has said the ban would remain in place only until we can "figure out what is going on." Trump is not proposing to ban Muslims because they worship Allah, but because virtually all of the mass terrorists attacks in Europe and the US have been carried out by Muslims. As the San Bernadino slaughter demonstrated, US authorities manifestly have not "figured out" what's going on, since the Muslim murderers were supposedly screened and entered our country legally.

By Tom Blumer | April 25, 2016 | 11:24 PM EDT

State Department spokesman John Kirby did a fist-pounding imitation of Baghdad Bob at a press conference today on the Obama administration's decision "to send 250 more troops to Syria."

Note that the Associated Press report by Kathleen Hennessey linked in the first paragraph refers to "troops," not "advisers" or "trainers." This is important, because that AP report acknowledges that in everyday parlance, the additional forces involved are "boots on the ground." The AP's Matt Lee, one of the few genuine journalists at the wire service, had to endure hearing Kirby say that the administration wasn't changing course or breaking a previous promise. Lee didn't take it well, nor should he have (HT Washington Free Beacon):

By Curtis Houck | April 12, 2016 | 8:31 PM EDT

As part of an interview with GOP presidential candidate John Kasich that aired on Tuesday’s CBS Evening News, anchor Scott Pelley fretted that Kasich might “tear out ObamaCare, root and branch, start all over again” and signal to the American people that they will be “going to war” to defeat ISIS. 

By Mark Finkelstein | April 1, 2016 | 12:17 PM EDT

It is a tragedy when any member of the US military is killed in combat. This is of course true regardless of race. But since Al Sharpton and an MSNBC guest have chosen to racialize and politicize the matter, it's incumbent to set the record straight.

On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough pointed out that Hillary has been much more hawkish and interventionist regarding foreign wars than Sanders. New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas then said "and the people who die in those coffins by the way have a racial make-up that is much browner and blacker than the rest of the country." Sharpton gave that notion a big amen, saying "there's no doubt about it." Actually, there's a lot of doubt about it. In fact, the statement is false. As eminent military historian Victor Davis Hanson has documented regarding US military deaths, "in almost all cases, the white death ratio approximated or exceeded the percentages of whites in the general population."

By Tom Blumer | March 26, 2016 | 12:00 AM EDT

If we had today's establishment press covering America just before the Revolution, few would have learned of Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty or give me to death!" If they had been covering the Revolutionary War itself, there would have been a blackout on Nathan Hale's "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."

Today's establishment press does anything and everything it can to keep important statements by people it despises out of the news. Thus, despite regularly perusing media outlets on a daily basis, it is intensely frustrating that I only learned about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's unforgettable five-word fundamental truth about Islamic terrorism by reading an Investor's Business Daily editorial.

By Mark Finkelstein | March 23, 2016 | 8:51 AM EDT

One of James Taranto's recurring categories in his WSJ Best of the Web Today column is "the soft bigotry of low expectations."  We have a great candidate for it from today's Morning Joe, as, expressing the sentiment of Americans at large, Joe Scarborough asked: "why can't our president be as tough as France's president?" Ouch.

From Scarborough to Mika Brzezinski to Nicolle Wallace, Rudy Giuliani to Michael Hayden, the condemnation of President Obama's weak, shades-wearing, wave-doing, grinning response to the Brussels outrage was relentless. Most brutal and disturbing of all was the assessement of former CIA Director Michael Hayden, who said of Obama's response: "that wasn't a mistake, that wasn't weakness, that was policy, that going to the ballpark and spending less than a minute commenting on the attack. I believe in his heart of hearts the president's policy is that is not that big a deal. There are other things that are more important and that was what he was messaging."

By Curtis Houck | March 22, 2016 | 9:23 PM EDT

Fox News contributor, frequent Special Report panelist, and syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer was given his own segment on Tuesday night’s Fox News Channel (FNC) show in light of the Islamic terror attacks in Brussels and he used his airtime to berate President Obama for his “ideological holiday trip” to communist Cuba “while the world burns.”

By Curtis Houck | March 22, 2016 | 6:55 PM EDT

During the 5:00 p.m. Eastern hour of MSNBC’s live coverage concerning the terror attacks in Belgium, breaking news anchor and former NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams shot back at State Department spokesman John Kirby when Kirby claimed that the attacks in Brussels illustrate why Islamic terrorist groups like ISIS are on the run.

By Tom Blumer | March 22, 2016 | 1:00 PM EDT

At Salon.com at 10:28 a.m., Amanda Marcotte wrote that "It will likely be days, perhaps weeks, before we know much about the horrific terrorist attacks on an airport and subway in Brussels on Tuesday morning that killed dozens of people."

Actually, dear, as of when I began this post about 90 minutes later, we alreadly know plenty. Most crucially, the Associated Press reported that the Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attacks roughly an hour after Marcotte's post. Once that's verified, and it almost certainly will be in short order, what else beyond the names of the de facto soldiers of the Islamic State will remain of the "much" that we don't know? But the most important thing to Marcotte, who is clearly blind in one eye and can't see out of the other, is that the United States has "a grown-up in charge" (links are in original; bolds are mine throughout this post):

By Brad Wilmouth | March 10, 2016 | 9:53 PM EST

As Florida Republican Governor Rick Scott appeared as a guest on Thursday's Erin Burnett Outfront to discuss the upcoming GOP presidential debate, host Burnett actually asked him of those who attack Donald Trump by comparing him to Adolf Hitler: "Do they have a point?"

By Matthew Balan | February 29, 2016 | 4:48 PM EST

On Monday's New Day, CNN's Alisyn Camerota badgered Rep. Tulsi Gabbard over her recent endorsement of Bernie Sanders. Camerota wondered, "Why endorse Bernie Sanders now — when, frankly, it feels as though the momentum, after South Carolina, has shifted away from him and towards Hillary Clinton?" She also touted Hillary Clinton's apparent foreign policy credentials: "Who knows more about foreign policy than the former secretary of state?"

By Brad Wilmouth | February 20, 2016 | 5:11 PM EST

On Friday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, correspondent Randi Kaye filed a report recounting her discussions with mostly young evangelical Christians in South Carolina as she asserted that the group she spoke with think GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz is "against the teachings of Jesus" on the issues of "poverty, war, and how to treat strangers." Implying that Cruz is not "compassionate," she concluded by recalling that they are "looking for someone who's compassionate" and "who has great acceptance for others."