Brad Wilmouth

Contributing Writer


Brad Wilmouth is a former Media Research Center news analyst and an alumnus of the University of Virginia.

Latest from Brad Wilmouth

On Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, just days after dehumanizing House Speaker Paul Ryan as a "monster," MSNBC political analyst and The Nation correspondent Joan Walsh was spewing more venom at the Wisconsin Republican as she described him as a "heartless, soulless Washington creature." She then went on to claim that he was someone who had "devoted their life to hurting people."


On Friday's The Last Word on MSNBC, it was the place for demonizing Republicans as regular MSNBC guests Joan Walsh and Nancy Giles called Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan a "monster" and declared that the way Senate Republicans had handled health care reform has been "criminal."

 


On Friday's Real Time show on HBO, liberal comedian Bill Maher derided the Senate Republican health care plan as being like "a manifesto from the Zodiac killer," and trashed Republican Senator Ted Cruz as someone who does not believe the bill is "mean" enough, and who has experience at "making people sick." He ended the show with a commentary in which he encouraged his audience members to reproduce less and snidely portrayed children as "resource-sucking, waste-making human beings" who are bad for the environment.


Appearing as a panel member on Friday's Real Time with Bill Maher, MSNBC contributor and former talk radio host Charlie Sykes displayed the latest example of why he is the type of right-leaning figure that liberal outfits like MSNBC include who will join liberal analysts in bashing Republicans. Sykes took aim at Fox News supposedly not informing its Republican-leaning viewers on the nefarious activities of President Donald Trump, and likened conservatives to a "cult" that always supports "Dear Leader" and "Orange Deuce."


As Montel Williams appeared on Friday's CNN Newsroom with Brooke Baldwin to discuss his recent USA Today article attacking Republican plans to repeal ObamaCare, the former talk show host accused congressional Republicans of not caring about their own family members and of supporting a plan that would send their relatives and 140 million other Americans to "death." Williams: "They are going to be looking for somebody to give them medication and health care. And what this bill does is sends them all to death. ... This Congress is the richest Congress we've ever had in history. They can afford premium health care. They don't care about even their own family members -- their cousins, their aunts or uncles or nieces who they all know have just been sentenced to death."


On Thursday's The 11th Hour on MSNBC, during a discussion of the debate over ObamaCare repeal, former Time magazine editor Rick Stengel -- also a former Obama administration official -- asserted that Republicans view health care as a "privilege" like a "concierge service" or "entitlement" that should be "starved."


In an article posted yesterday, Salon politics writer Chauncey DeVega trashed Republican Rep. Steve Scalise as a "bigot" and accused the Republican party of being a "sociopathic" entity that has "weaponized" the Scalise shooting and is "drunk on conspiracy theories and other hallucinogenic beliefs." He also repeated the discredited claim that Scalise spoke to a "white supremacist" group in 2002, and even went so far as to claim that he was an "honored guest" for the racist group.


You read it here first. Two months ago -- and again last night -- NewsBusters pointed out that there was a major hole in the dominant media theory that GA-06 was a "solidly Republican" district that Republicans should be embarrassed about having to defend in yesterday's special election. In spite of Donald Trump just barely winning the district last November, many journalists and commentators touted former Republican Rep. Tom Price's landslide reelection from the same Election Day as evidence the district was still solidly Republican and that its coolness toward Trump was just an anomalous diversion from normalcy.


Appearing as a panel member on Wednesday's New Day, left-leaning CNN political analyst and Daily Beast editor John Avlon tried to spin Democrat Jon Ossoff's defeat in Georgia as being because of a "rigged system of redistricting" that gave Republicans a "heavy advantage."


Appearing as a guest on Tuesday's MTP Daily on MSNBC, Washington Post editorial page deputy editor Ruth Marcus repeated the misleading claim that, because former Republican Rep. Tom Price has a history of winning landslide victories, the 6th Congressional District of Georgia should still be a solidly Republican seat. The liberal Post columnist admitted President Donald Trump barely won the district as she began her prediction: "I think if Republicans can't keep this seat, they're really in trouble in the Trump years, and here's why: Yes, Trump won it by a point, but Tom Price won it by multiple, you know, double digits repeatedly."


As the three broadcast network evening newscasts on Friday informed viewers that former Minnesota police officer Jeronimo Yanez was found not guilty of committing manslaughter last year against black motorist Philando Castile, CBS conspicuously omitted two facets of the case that help explain why he was acquitted. More than a year ago, Castile was tragically shot to death by Officer Yanez after Castile -- who had a concealed carry permit and therefore no criminal record -- informed the officer that he possessed a firearm during a traffic stop. 


After MSNBC counterterrorism analyst Malcolm Nance confronted Breitbart editor Alex Marlow on Friday's Real Time show, demanding that he retract an article from last April which accurately highlighted Nance "nominating" a Donald Trump property for a terrorist attack, actor Mark Hamill was so impressed with the liberal MSNBC analyst that the Star Wars icon praised him on Twitter and dubbed him a "Jedi master." After MSNBC's Joy Reid highlighted Hamill's tweet on her AM Joy show on Sunday, Hamill also threw some Twitter praise toward the far-left MSNBC host.


Appearing as a guest on Sunday's Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson blamed a Republican "rage machine" for the level of political polarization that currently exists, and complained about how congressional Republicans are conducting business. She also oddly claimed that Democrats were not partisan in their reaction to President Donald Trump's nomination of Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch -- even though Republicans had to change the filibuster rule to keep Democrats from blocking his confirmation to the Court.

 


Appearing as a guest on Friday's All In with Chris Hayes on MSNBC, former New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson slammed the Donald Trump administration's accomplishments so far as a "debacle" and declared that the Republican budget has "savagely" taken money from poverty programs and education. Abramson: "I think both of the scenarios, Chris, that you just laid out equal debacle because, you know, he has done quite a bit, but I think what he's done has been, you know, altogether damaging both to the country and internationally. ... A budget that has savagely taken money from housing programs from the poor, federal money for the schools."

 


As the Reverend William Barber appeared as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC to give his religion-based views on current events, host Joy Reid at one point seemed to worry about not being able to talk more about Republican Rep. Steve Scalise's conservative views and his history on "race," as she recalled the discredited story that the congressman spoke to a white nationalist event 15 years ago.


On Thursday's CBS Evening News, as Nancy Cordes filed a report with the latest on the aftermath of the Steve Scalise shooting, the CBS correspondent made a point of highlighting Democratic criticisms of Republicans New Gingrich and New York Rep. Chris Collins for complaining about "hostility" and "rhetoric" coming from the far left. Cordes notably did not mention that Rep. Collins had already decided to retract his comments as he feared they were not appropriate in the aftermath of the violence.


On Wednesday's Fox and Friends, as Fox News producer Greg Pergram reported in by phone in the aftermath of the attack on congressional Republicans in Alexandria, Virginia, he incorrectly recalled that it was the KKK that Scalise was accused of meeting with, when in reality the debunked accusation was that he spoke to a white nationalist group that was founded by David Duke. Additionally, Pergram failed to inform viewers that, even though Scalise issued an apology, the central claim that Scalise spoke to Duke's group was undermined both by a flyer from the event that did not list Scalise as a speaker, and by a man who helped organize the event who claimed that he invited Scalise to speak at a separate gathering that was not part of the white nationalist convention.


On Wednesday's All In, MSNBC contributor Jason Johnson still seemed to be clinging to the discredited story that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise spoke to a "white nationalist" group in Louisiana 15 years ago, as he suggested that the congressman has helped "exacerbate" tensions in politics. Near the end of the show, as host Chris Hayes suggested that liberals should ponder what their reaction would be "if the shoe were on the other foot" with regard to the Scalise shooting, Johnson suggested that politicians, including Scalise, do things to get votes that "exacerbate" tensions and "activate" people into violent behavior.


In a pre-recorded report on Thursday's New Day, CNN correspondent Randi Kaye repeated a discredited claim that Republican Rep. Steve Scalise 15 years ago spoke to a group founded by white supremacist and former KKK leader David Duke. As if the assertion that he spoke to the group were not in dispute, Kaye recalled: "Questions were raised about a speech he gave to a group led by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke back in 2002."


Appearing as a guest on Saturday's AM Joy, MSNBC contributor and Newsweek senior editor Kurt Eichenwald accused Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Republican members of Congress of defending "right-wing terrorists" during the Obama administration, as the liberal journalist tried to implicate mainstream conservatives in recent reports of hate crimes. Eichenwald: "In order to attack Obama. they said conservatives are right-wing terrorists. They told these right-wing extremists, 'You are one of us.'"