Brad Wilmouth

Contributing Writer


Brad Wilmouth is a former Media Research Center news analyst and an alumnus of the University of Virginia.

Latest from Brad Wilmouth

On Friday morning's News One Now, host Roland Martin repeatedly ranted over the 33-year sentence that O.J. Simpson received almost a decade ago, even as the far-left commentator admitted he believes Simpson was indeed guilty of the prior offense of murder that he was acquitted of in 1995. After complaining that the judge in the 2008 armed robbery case had been "shameful" and "despicable," he charged that "white folks can't get over O.J.," leading one guest to provocatively mock whites because they lost a "precious white woman and a precious white man" who were killed by the former NFL star.


As all the major news networks this week have highlighted the tragic case of Minnesota bride-to-be Justine Damond being shot to death by a police officer, far-left News One Now host Roland Martin -- who sometimes appears on MSNBC -- has conspicuously given no attention to the story even while continuing to update viewers on high-profile cases of blacks being killed by the police.


On Wednesday's MTP Daily, during a discussion of the Trump administration's Voter Integrity Commission, MSNBC analyst and Daily Beast columnist Jonathan Alter griped that it is actually a "voter suppression commission" which poses a "threat to democracy." He then warned of America becoming a "banana republic" and asserted that the commission is "trying to rig" the election "for the next time."


On the Monday edition of his eponymously named PBS show, host Tavis Smiley provided a forum with little pushback for author and American University Professor Ibram Kendi to claim that the social problems that disproportionately exist within America's black population are the result of continuing racial discrimination, and that those who do not agree with his conclusions therefore must believe blacks are "inferior."


On Sunday's MSNBC special, Trump at 6 Months, a panel stacked with liberals was assembled to discuss the conflict between President Donald Trump and the media. Given the makeup of the panel, it was no surprise that the group concluded that distrust of the media was the fault of right-wingers attacking them for decades, and that the media should continue what they already are doing, rather than make reforms to regain credibility. 


On Monday, CNN's New Day devoted time to Donald Trump voters who recalled some of the hostility shown to them by liberals angry at them during a segment on how Trump voters are reacting to the President. One man recalled being told he should have been "aborted at birth," with another who described himself as a "female impersonator" who recounted being "blackballed" by his colleagues.


On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, during the show's regular "Gotcha" segment, host Al Sharpton was imagining racist dog whistles as he complained about "unmitigated, racially-tinged cruelty" from Congressman Steve King, and suggested that those who think like the Iowa Republican are "evil."

 


On Friday's MSNBC Live, host Craig Melvin denied that the dominant news media have a liberal bias after Republican Congressman Dave Brat started hitting him with reports that over 96 percent of journalists who made political donations chose Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump. A bit later, Melvin denied biased reporting as he declared, "Even if that bias did exist -- which, I mean, Dave, it doesn't -- even if it did --" Brat zinged him: "If it exists? Now, you got to come clean with me on that one."


On Thursday's The Situation Room on CNN, during a discussion of President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the Paris Accord, CNN's Jim Acosta and Jeffrey Toobin both pushed the notion that the liberal view of global theory is "settled science." Toobin: "Do we always talk about climate in terms of the politics of it? The climate is actually a science issue. And the science -- the climate is going to continue warming regardless of what his base wants or, you know, it's actually science and not politics." Acosta: "It's settled science."

 


Appearing as a guest on Thursday's All In with Chris Hayes, MSNBC's Joy Reid was displaying a severe case of projection as the far-left AM Joy host claimed that the Republican party is "built on" "resentment," "victimhood," and a "persecution complex" -- all of which would be more aptly applied to her own liberal ideology.


Appearing as a panel member on Wednesday's The 11th Hour on MSNBC, presidential historian and former Newsweek editor-in-chief Jon Meacham took a whack at Donald Trump supporters as he asserted that Republicans have "Stockholm Syndrome" and have "sold their souls" in supporting Trump's election as president. A bit earlier, fellow panel member and liberal columnist Connie Schultz suggested that the political debate over replacing Obamacare is causing "anxiety" in people that requires treatment from doctors.


On Monday's CNN Tonight, correspondent Sara Sidner recalled reports of an 11 percent increase in hate crimes in California, but did not put into context that the state has recently suffered a general increase in violent crime -- that is about in line with the hate crime increase -- that has been linked to the release of many formerly incarcerated criminals.


On Wednesday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of how to pay for President Donald Trump's proposed border wall, co-host Alisyn Camerota seemed taken aback that Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King suggested shifting money from the food stamp program to help pay for the wall. Camerota fretted: "You want to take food from people that are s -- the people who are on the lowest rung in terms of the nation's safety net and their children -- in terms of food stamps, you're happy to take -- you're willing to take money from them to build the 1.6 or to give the 1.6 billion to the border wall?"

 


On Tuesday's MSNBC Live, News One Now managing editor Roland Martin -- a former CNN contributor who is now a recurring MSNBC guest -- charged that the Republican party is the "greatest threat to democracy" in America and even invoked Civil Rights Movement-era racism as he likened Virginia Republican Rep. Bob Goodlatte to a Virginia "segregationist" from the past.


Appearing as a guest on Monday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, New York Times columnist Tom Friedman tagged President Donald Trump as a "chump" who has been "manipulated" by Russia and "played" by China. He even oddly lumped in Israel as a country that has "manipulated" President Trump.

 


As Saturday's CNN Newsroom with Fredricka Whitfield devoted a segment to the issue of women becoming more politically active after Donald Trump became President, CNN's Jodi Enda never applied a "liberal" label to the left-wing causes supported by recent women protesters even as she asserted that the current Congress is "quite conservative."

 


Appearing as a guest on Sunday's MSNBC Live, MSNBC political analyst Joan Walsh fretted over Ivanka Trump wearing a "girlie" dress while sitting in for President Donald Trump in a meeting of the G-20. The left-wing The Nation correspondent suggested that the dress made the President's daughter look like "property" -- reminiscent of "patriarchal, authoritarian societies" -- and bemoaned that Ivanka's behavior in the White House is "frightening."


Appearing as a guest on Thursday's CNN Tonight, liberal New York Times columnist and CNN commentator Charles Blow managed to make a case that there is a liberal bias in the dominant media even while concluding that the liberal bias claim is "kind of false" as he asserted that there is actually an "urban media bias" instead. Host Don Lemon and CNN media reporter Brian Stelter voiced agreement with Blow's assessment.


On Wednesday's The 11th Hour with Brian Williams, MSNBC contributor Charlie Sykes joined substitute host Nicolle Wallace -- formerly of the Bush administration -- for a "recovering Republicans" therapy session as the two discussed the Republican health care plan, and, true to form, Sykes made jabs from the left in spite of being a supposedly right-leaning analyst.


On Thursday's New Day on CNN, during a discussion of President Donald Trump's speech in Poland, CNN international correspondent Christiane Amanpour at one point hinted that those who are "denying climate science" are similar to those who used to think the planets and sun revolve around the Earth as she recalled Trump's decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Accord.