Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
April 20, 2016, 8:46 PM EDT

Three important things happened at Tuesday's hearing of the House Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Immigration and Border Security.

The first was the testimony of two mothers of children killed by illegal immigrants. The second was the outrageous and false contention by a Methodist bishop that the mere act of bringing attention to these heinous offenses is a form of "blind vengeance" over "isolated ... incidents." (In other words, it is our moral duty to shut up.) The third explains why very few Americans have no idea that the first two items occurred, namely that the establishment press, consistent with its practice since Republicans took over the House of Representative in early 2011, chose not to cover what happened at yet another congressional hearing.

April 19, 2016, 11:38 PM EDT

In another blow to the U.S. and worldwide economy, chipmaker Intel announced today that it is reducing its worldwide workforce by 12,000 people, a cut of 11 percent.

Of course, there are tech-related reasons why the company made the move, most notably the shift by some users to tablets and smartphones, where the company's market penetration has been weak and almost non-existent, respectively, as their everyday "computing" devices. But the press is completely ignoring why so many users of aging PCs are holding out against buying a new one until their current units die: they don't have the money to replace them. Why? Because economic growth throughout the world, including the U.S., has been stagnant and is showing signs of getting weaker — possibly much weaker.

April 19, 2016, 6:04 PM EDT

Has Newsweek just admitted to something the rest of the press knows but won't acknowledge?

In promoting its insufferably fawning portrayal of California Governor Jerry Brown, the weekly magazine tweeted that Brown is "arming California to meet an economic recession head-on." Recession? What recession?

April 19, 2016, 11:21 AM EDT

The government reported this morning that seasonally adjusted March housing starts and building permits fell by 8.8 percent and 7.7 percent, respectively, far worse declines than analysts and economists predicted.

After the report, the business wires at least communicated the facts accurately, but continued to insist almost to the point of editorializing that there's no reason to be worried about the long-term direction of housing market or the overall economy.

April 18, 2016, 11:13 PM EDT

Earlier today, Tim Graham at NewsBusters covered a poll done by an Associated Press-led partnership which found that, in AP's words, "Just 6 percent of people say they have a lot of confidence in the media, putting the news industry about equal to Congress and well below the public's view of other institutions."

The poll noted that "Nearly 90 percent of Americans say it's extremely or very important that the media get their facts correct." How ironic it therefore is that the Pulitzer prize announcements this afternoon contained two glaring failures to "get facts correct."

April 18, 2016, 7:19 PM EDT

Longtime readers know that if the current stagnating economy were occurring during a Republican or conservative presidential administration, the press would be searching high and low to find a "respected" economist or analyst forecasting the beginning of an economic contraction while screaming that a recession is just around the corner. Instead, the business press has stuck to saying that "most economists" are predicting a first-quarter economic growth result of under an annualized 1 percent.

Well, on Friday, a major firm released the first official projection of contraction I've seen — and yes, the press has failed to notice it. But it's understandable, because the circumstances make one wonder if the firm involved and its chief economist aren't trying to keep the result as invisible as possible in hopes that the current figure can soon be revised upward.

April 17, 2016, 11:17 PM EDT

Key data about the U.S. economy's performance released this past week was mostly dismal. Wednesday brought news that seasonally adjusted March retail sales, instead of climbing as predicted, fell by 0.3 percent. Later that morning, the government reported that manufacturing and trade inventories and sales both fell in February.

The worst news came on Friday, when the Federal Reserve reported that March industrial production, defying predictions of a tiny decrease, fell by 0.6 percent for the second straight month. The manufacturing component fell by 0.3 percent, and February's 0.1 percent manufacturing increase was revised to show a 0.1 percent decline. The Fed's Friday report was especially problematic for the Associated Press.

April 15, 2016, 1:46 PM EDT

For better or worse, the press, Wall Street and others routinely place a great deal of faith in the federal government's payroll employment estimates.

But when Republican Governor Rick Scott's supporters cited data from Uncle Sam's Bureau of Labor Statistics to defend him against an insufferably rude leftist who started screaming and cursing at him in a Starbucks coffee shop, Associated Press reporters Jason Dearen and Gary Fineout, in a story the wire service carried nationally, claimed that Scott could only "allege that thousands of new jobs" were created in the Gainesville area, even though the claim was based on the same data the press routinely accepts as gospel

April 14, 2016, 8:38 PM EDT

Yesterday was supposed to be a glorious day for the people involved in organizing something they called the "Million Student March."

On Monday, they had priceless free publicity provided by leftist luminaries at the Huffington Post. They had a new source of support and participation from the "Black Liberation Collective." They had four platforms students could supposedly believe in and get behind. They had reasonably nice weather in much of the country. According to the Daily Caller, with all these positive factors working in their favor, the perhaps "hundreds" of rallies involved typically drew ... uh ... well, between 10 and two dozen people. Most establishment press outlets have saved the poor kids the embarrassment of exposure; but one pair of especially gullible TV stations in Maine played along, and thoroughly beclowned themselves.

April 14, 2016, 1:45 PM EDT

Just three months after Arch, the nation's Number 2 coal mining company, filed for bankruptcy, Number 1, Peabody Energy, has followed suit. Five of the industry's largest firms have now gone bankrupt in the past 12 months.

Two Associated Press stories on Peabody this week managed to avoid mentioning the name of President Barack Obama, whose hostility toward the industry has been obvious since his first presidential campaign, or to directly cite his administration's Environmental Protection Agency as a factor in the firm's trip to bankruptcy court.

April 13, 2016, 10:45 PM EDT

Two writers at the Five Thirty-Eight blog, purchased by ABC's ESPN network two years ago, have done something the crime increase causation deniers will surely detest: demonstrate, based on statistical evidence, and despite their tentative language, that "real changes in the process of policing in Chicago" have led to "spike in gun violence in Chicago since the end of November."

Translating the work of writers Rob Arthur and Jeff Asher into plain English: There has been a clear "Ferguson effect" crime wave in the Second City since the release of the Laquan McDonald video in late November; now the criminals are literally getting away with murder with horrifying frequency (HT Powerline; links are in original; bolds are mine throughout this post):

April 13, 2016, 11:45 AM EDT

Today's report from the government on retail sales was awful — "unexpectedly" so, according to both Bloomberg and Reuters. Following on the heels of a 0.4 percent seasonally adjusted decline in January and a flat February, March sales fell by 0.3 percent.

Two of the three main U.S. business wire services blamed the American people, not the worst post-recession economy since World War II during the Obama administration — an economy which is clearly weakening even further — for these results.

April 12, 2016, 3:17 PM EDT

Add this to the seemingly endless list of "Imagine what would happen if Republicans or conservatives did the same thing" items.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary "I don't feel no ways tired" Clinton and New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio rolled out a very tired, old and insulting racist stereotype this weekend. The headline at Stephanie Condon's report on the related event at CBS News only described it as a "race-based joke." Meanwhile, the Associated Press kept the nature of the "joke" out of its headline, and the wire service's Jonathan Lemire would only concede that "some people feel" that the "comedy skit" in which the pair engaged "was racially insensitive." Here's what happened, from the first four paragraphs of Condon's report (bolds are mine throughout this post):

April 12, 2016, 1:33 AM EDT

Despite the decay of the left-dominated blue-city model during the past several decades, liberals and the press are not fans of many urban neighborhood improvement efforts.

One recent example found at a national media outlet is at Newsweek, where on April 2, Alexander Nazaryan, in an item headlined "WHITE CITY: THE NEW URBAN BLIGHT IS RICH PEOPLE," wrote that "gentrification ... turns cities into playgrounds for moneyed, childless whites while pushing out the poor, the working-class, immigrants, seniors and anyone else not plugged into 'the knowledge economy.'" In Cincinnati, the same tone was unfortunately present in the Cincinnati Enquirer's Sunday coverage of the situation in the city's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood 15 years after that area's race riots made national news.

April 10, 2016, 11:55 PM EDT

On Tuesday, shortly after Governor Jerry Brown signed California's $15-an-hour minimum wage legislation, the Associated Press's Michael R. Blood and Don Thompson called the move "a victory for those struggling on the margins of the economy and the politically powerful unions that pushed it."

As seen in a NewsBusters post on March 31, it's definitely a win for union members whose wages are set at a multiple of the state's minimum wage. But it's not a "victory" for "struggling" workers who will lose their jobs or not be able to become employed at the higher rate. The AP pair would only concede that "the overall goal of helping the working poor might be lessened if some employers cut jobs or, worse, leave the state." Forget the "if" on employers cutting jobs, guys. That's because, as Jeb Graham at Investor's Business Daily reported on Friday (HT Hot Air), two states which have only raised their minimums to just over $10 have already seen seasonally adjusted job losses (bolds are mine):

April 9, 2016, 5:08 PM EDT

Two weeks ago, yours truly posted on a very inadequate March 26 U.S.-distributed Associated Press story out of Glasgow the previous day (since expired) about the murder of Asad Shah. Despite the fact that far more information was known at the time, the wire service would only acknowledge that "the killing of a Muslim shopkeeper who wished Christians a happy Easter is being investigated as 'religiously prejudiced,'" and (four paragrahs in) that "The suspect, who police say is Muslim, has not been identified or charged." AP has not done a follow-up story, even though far more beyond what it failed to originally report is now known.

In a Washington Post "WorldViews" blog post on Friday, Max Bearak attempted to bring readers up to date, in the process exposing — but from all appearances acquiescing to — Orwellian attempts by the dominant Muslim community to disavow their religion's association with Shah's murder and to distance themselves from their hostility towards other faiths.

April 7, 2016, 12:33 AM EDT

In a properly functioning news environment, where genuine journalists recognize important news and report it without first screening its relevance through a PC filter, the deaths of volunteer firefighter Peter Hacking and his two young daughters in a car crash near Wylie, Texas last week would have become a widely covered national story by now. Sadly, virtually the only reason it's known at all outside of Texas is because a center-right media outlet learned of it, and Matt Drudge has headlined it.

Given the prominence of illegal immigration in the two major parties' presidential contests this year, and the death of Kate Steinle at the hands of an illegal immigrant who had previously been deported several times in the sanctuary city of San Francisco last year, the Hackings' deaths should be national news.

April 6, 2016, 9:24 PM EDT

Perhaps this is why the press has been reluctant to cite economists who are predicting that sharp increases in state minimum wages like the $15-per-hour minimums just passed in California and New York will reduce employment: They're with many of their lefty brethren who don't care whether jobs are lost. So they must believe that no one else should care either.

At the Washington Post's WonkBlog on Friday, in what was not an April Fool's-related column, Lydia DePillis ridiculed "warnings of a job apocalypse." And besides, she wrote, "the economic architecture that supports the Fight for $15 is built entirely different logic" — logic which the establishment press has refused to report as the hikers' real agenda.

April 6, 2016, 6:40 PM EDT

On Sunday, I noted how USA Today, the Associated Press, and the establishment press in general have swallowed the Obama administration's line that the 61 convicted and incarcerated criminals whose sentences the President commuted last Thursday were "low-level inmates" guilty of "low-level drug offenses." A spreadsheet working only from the information the White House provided demonstrates that this characterization was largely bogus.

Over at the Heritage Foundation's Daily Signal on Monday, Leah Jessen provided more damning detail about the certain of these criminals' "low-level" offenses — details which almost certainly won't be reported at national establishment press outlets (bolds are mine throughout this post):

April 5, 2016, 11:18 PM EDT

At Politico tonight, the headline is: "Sanders crushes Clinton in Wisconsin." Given Mrs. Clinton's frontrunner status and the fact that, as the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel noted on Saturday (HT Ann Althouse), "Wisconsin has a nearly unbroken modern-day record of voting for party front-runners in its presidential primary," that's an accurate characterization of Sanders' 12-point lead over Mrs. Clinton with over two-thirds of the votes counted at the time of this post.

Politico's subheadline: "He’s won seven of the past eight contests, but will it matter?" That's a fair question, given the anti-democratic situation with superdelegates in the Democratic Party. It's also an assessment based on the fact that much of the rest of the establishment press has been determined to write off Sanders' recent resurgence, including tonight's win, as likely irrelevant.