Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
April 4, 2016, 5:02 PM EDT

The Associated Press, the nation's de facto business news gatekeeper for those who don't follow the economy or the markets closely, is telling America that the U.S. job market is fine, and ignoring the dismal results seen in weekly pay during the past several months.

Christopher Rugaber's Friday evening coverage of the government's jobs report earlier in the day described the reported 215,000 in seasonally adjusted payroll job additions as "last month's healthy hiring." Paul Wiseman, in a separate dispatch dealing with downbeat news in the University of Michigan's consumer confidence survey, which had the worst reading in five months, insisted that "the job market is healthy." Well, more people are working, but even with their slightly larger numbers, they're collectively working fewer hours and earning less total pay than they were two months ago.

April 3, 2016, 10:21 PM EDT

Earlier this evening, Curtis Houck at NewsBusters noted how Hillary Clinton committed an obvious gaffe for someone who is supposedly radically pro-abortion. On NBC's Meet the Press, Chuck Todd asked, "When, or if, does an unborn child have constitutional rights?" Mrs. Clinton responded that "the unborn person doesn't have constitutional rights."

The best way to tell when a leftist's gaffe is serious is to see if the Associated Press or the New York Times have recognized its existence. As of 9 p.m. ET this evening, neither has. So it's serious. Pile-ons are coming from the left and the right.

April 3, 2016, 5:56 PM EDT

The antennae went up when I saw the following tease on the front page of Thursday's USA Today print edition: "Obama commutes sentences for 61 low-level inmates." The brief description which immediately followed told readers that "He has cut sentences for 248 so far, more than (the) previous 6 presidents combined, official says."

Hmm. What's a "low-level inmate"? The underlying Page 3A article by David Jackson (posted in slightly revised form Wednesday evening at the paper's web site) tells us that it's someone who has committed "low-level drug offenses." The list of commutations published by the White House identifies the supposedly puny "low-level offenses" the recipients of the President's commutations committed. Here's a hint: The average person won't agree with the "low-level" characterization.

April 2, 2016, 8:47 PM EDT

The Associated Press sent its cameramen and reporters out to get the reaction of small business owners to California's just-passed six-year plan to raise the state's minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Anyone expecting the AP to find representative responses clearly doesn't understand how the far-left propaganda machine disguised as an objective news service operates. All three business owners interviewed operate in ultra-high-cost San Francisco. The first told AP that $15 an hour "is still probably not enough." The second complained bitterly that the increase should have targeted "multinational corporations" and spared little guys like him. The third demonstrated the likelihood of an upward ripple effect above the minimum-wage level when he signaled his intention to continue to pay more than the minimum even after its 50 percent impact fully hits.

March 31, 2016, 11:09 PM EDT

In covering Thursday morning's report from the Department of Labor on initial unemployment claims, one of a relatively few economic reports showing strength these days, Associated Press reporter Scott Boak spread his enthusiasm over the result to the entire economy. It wasn't justified.

It's as if the poor guy has missed most of the pertinent other economic news during the past week, most of which — other than the stock market's recovery from earlier losses this year, which is more dependent on Federal Reserve Chairman Janet Yellen's moods than it is on economic fundamentals — have been anything but strong.

March 31, 2016, 9:01 PM EDT

A Los Angeles Times story by Liam Dillon and Patrick McGreevy hailed the "historic" increase in the state-mandated minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Apparently giddy with excitement, the pair also unwisely told readers that many public-sector employees who earn far more will be receiving big raises as a result of the legislation with having to bother negotiating with the government entities involved to get them.

March 31, 2016, 2:09 PM EDT

Wednesday morning, Tim Graham at NewsBusters observed how pseudo-conservative David Brooks, who is no fan of Donald Trump, gave the current GOP frontrunner credit for having "destroyed a dying husk" of "obsolete Reagan ideology" in the Republican Party.

That's fascinating stuff, given the catch of the day by Instapundit's Ed Driscoll. You see, 12 years ago, Brooks gave Reagan credit for having transformed the party and conservatism "from a past- and loss-oriented movement to a future- and possibility-oriented one." In other words, even Dense David recognized at the time that Reagan's positive tone and belief in American exceptionalism — a term which the left, up to and including President Obama, has tried to ridicule out of existence — were the foundation for how Reagan, in Brooks's words, "embraced America as a revolutionary force."

March 30, 2016, 11:45 PM EDT

Nobody could have seen this coming.

That's sarcasm, folks. Everyone but those who somehow thought that hope would somehow triumph over experience in the kinds of patients who would utilize Obamacare saw this coming. CNN Money Senior Writer Tami Luhby is reporting, with some apparent surprise, that "Obamacare patients are sicker and pricier than expected" (bolds are mine; HT Twitchy):

March 30, 2016, 10:35 PM EDT

Mark Zandi, Moody's chief economist, comments monthly on the ADP private-sector employment report his firm compiles. He is "often quoted in national and global publications and interviewed by major news media outlets, and is a frequent guest on CNBC, NPR, Meet the Press, CNN, and various other national networks and news programs."

Zandi has also been the economy's head cheerleader during much of the era of the historically weak Obama "recovery." During the past few months, Zandi has openly questioned the validity of the government's estimates of economic growth, believing that they are materially understated. Though I have argued that the official unemployment rate is not credible, Zandi does not have a problem with Uncle Sam's usually decent jobs reports. In fact, they are his main form of "proof," despite badly lagging productivity, that the government is understating gross domestic product (GDP) growth. His persistence on this issue led me to do some research.

March 30, 2016, 11:40 AM EDT

Those who have noticed that the Associated Press, even to this day, tends to be sympathetic towards leftist causes, leftist protesters, leftist and totalitarian governments, and even terrorists in its coverage of domestic and world events won't be surprised by what follows. Others who still believe that the AP has always at least tried to be a paragon of objectivity will be stunned.

The UK Guardian addresses evidence found by a German historian who claims that AP, alone among international news agencies, was allowed to remain in Germany after Adolf Hitler rose to power because it was willing to cooperate with his Nazi regime (HT Times of Israel):

March 29, 2016, 11:58 PM EDT

It's so predictable.

Whenever a government or leader follows the left's playbook and the results "uexpectedly" don't turn out to be anywhere near what was desired, it isn't the policies' or the leader's fault. No-no-no. During the Mayor David Dinkins era in New York City, it was because Gotham had become ungovernable by any human being – until Rudy Giuliani took over. During the Carter Era, the conventional wisdom was that America had become too unwieldy and ungovernable — until Ronald Reagan righted the ship. We're now hearing a similar refrain about the U.S. economy after seven-plus years of Keynesian economic policies, except that, as we'll eventually see, it involves recycling. On Friday, Jacob Davidson at Time.com engaged in a lengthy excuse-making exercise (HT Hot Air Headlines; bolds and numbered tags are mine):

March 29, 2016, 7:38 PM EDT

This sentence actually appeared at the web site of the San Jose Mercury News Monday afternoon regarding California's Democratic Governor Jerry Brown: "In his 2016 budget plan, the notoriously frugal governor warned that a $15 minimum wage would cost the state about $4 billion a year and risk plunging it back into the red." Yesterday, Governor Brown "sudden(ly) embraced" the $15 minimum wage.

At one time, Brown had a reputation for personal frugality, cultivating it well past its expiration date, even as he and his wife lived in a $1.8 million mansion before he became governor in 2010. He also recently had the state pay $2.5 milllion so he could move into the old governor's mansion. But in the context of reporter Matthew Artz's just-cited sentence, the average reader would surely come away believing that Brown is frugal with taxpayers' money. Hardly.

March 29, 2016, 11:46 AM EDT

In a variation on a popular saying in real estate — "The three most important factors are location, location and location" — the State of Connecticut, since Democrat Dannel Malloy became Governor five years ago, has employed three strategies to balance its budget: raising taxes, raising taxes, and raising taxes.

The Nutmeg State's next planned round of tax increases includes a proposal pushed by the eponymously named Senate President Martin Looney to tax Yale University's $25.6 billion endowment. The headline at Bloomberg News's coverage of the proposal last Wednesday absurdly described the state as "cash-strapped," and didn't even try to explain how the state has gotten to this desperate point.

March 28, 2016, 6:02 PM EDT

Who says that there can't be occasional agreements across the partisan divide?

The free-market, liberty-loving editorial board at Investor's Business Daily and a Bernie Sanders-supporting columnist at the Huffingon Post agree on one thing: Hillary Clinton should withdraw from the presidential race. Okay, IBD wants her to "suspend," while HuffPo's H.A. Goodman says she should "concede." Both missives declare that Mrs. Clinton's withdrawal should be based on the FBI's criminal investigation into her "homebrew" server and her alleged reckless treatment of classified emails and the information contained therein. Here's the dirty little secret the establishment press won't acknowledge: Mrs. Clinton's criminal and other problems simply must have impacted her horrible losses in five of the six most recent nomination contests.

March 28, 2016, 1:39 PM EDT

For the past month, the conventional wisdom about the U.S. economy has been that consumer spending and "(not really) robust" job growth will continue to prop up the economy, even as weaknesses in manufacturing, trade and other areas continue to present problems. President Obama bragged in early March that the economy is "pretty darned good now."

Today, the first of those two pillars got pulled. The countless press reports during the past 4-1/2 weeks which reassured readers that consumer spending started off the year strong — conveniently during the peak presidential primary season — are now rubbish. Today, we learned that January's originally reported 0.5 percent spike, revised down to 0.1 percent, was almost entirely fictional, and that February was also weak. Despite the disappointing news, most press reports found some "expert" who, with little genuine basis, expects a rebound.

March 28, 2016, 12:08 AM EDT

Media outlets around the world are reporting that Faycal Cheffou has been arrested for his alleged involvement with last week's terrorist attacks in Belgium.

Media outlets around the world are reporting that Faycal Cheffou was a journalist — except for the Associated Press.

March 27, 2016, 6:32 PM EDT

Three years ago, Mark Finkelstein at NewsBusters noted how Google was subject to a torrent of criticism for devoting its March 31 special-occasion redesign of its logo, otherwise known as a "doodle," to the 86th anniversary of farm workers' leader Cesar Chavez's birthday. March 31 was also Easter Sunday that year.

Finkelstein noted that even hardened MSNBC liberal Mika Brzezinski sided with critics, saying, "how about a statement one day that just says: 'we screwed up'?" Chavez himself, who was a devout Catholic, would likely have been just as offended as anyone at Google's choice. Well, it turns out that the Chavez controversy only hinted at what MSNBC's Joe Scarborough called the company's "cultural blind spot" relating to Easter.

March 27, 2016, 3:37 PM EDT

Perhaps it would be understandable if U.S. media outlets chose not to cover the death of Asad Shah in Scotland. After all, it occurred overseas, and only one person has died.

But the Associated Press did decide to cover the story and post it at its subscribers' U.S. news sites. As such, the AP has a duty to reveal what is known at the time its reports appear. Thus far, it has failed miserably. It is painfully obvious why that failure has occurred, namely because Asad Shah's death inconveniently answers the following question: "Why don't we hear more outrage from moderate Muslims over those who invoke Islam to justify terrorism and persecution, thereby, according to popular perception, highjacking their supposedly inherently peaceful religion?"

March 26, 2016, 10:46 PM EDT

When was the last time a badly trailing presidential candidate in either major party won relatively late-in-the-game contests by lopsided victory margins of greater than 70-30, as Bernie Sanders did in Washington today, and greater than 80-20, as Sanders did in Alaska? I'm virtually certain that the answer to that question, regardless of what happens in Hawaii's Democratic primary much later tonight Eastern Time, is: Never.

Two of the three major news outlets I reviewed failed to report the size of Sanders' thumping victory margins. It is, however, quite telling that the third, the New York Times, though it had a blasé "he won" headline, conceded that Sanders' wins support "his argument that the race for the Democratic nomination is not a foregone conclusion."

March 26, 2016, 10:53 AM EDT

As noted in my previous post, the press is determined that the world not learn of profound statements made by world leaders it despises. The specific reference was to Israeli Prime Mininster Benjamin Netanyahu's five-word admonishment to those who believe that some accommodation can be reached with Islamic terrorists: "Terrorists Have No Resolvable Grievances."

Meanwhile, the press protects those it likes when they make breathtakingly ignorant remarks. Such remarks occur with alarming regularity any time U.S. President Barack Obama speaks without the aid of a teleprompter. In Argentina on Wednesday, during a question-answer exchange with a youth group, Obama said that debates over the superiority of capitalism compared to communism "are interesting intellectual arguments," but that "for your generation, you should be practical and just choose from what works." Press coverage of Obama's remarks has been sparse.