Tom Blumer

Tom Blumer's picture
Contributing Editor


Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog, BizzyBlog.com, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer

Donald Trump-directed assassination chic has hit a critical, and apparently critically accepted, mass. Middle-aged, extremely wealthy misogynist rap "artist" Snoop Dogg, a pioneer in the genre who has millions of followers, has produced a video which portrays President Trump as a pot smoking clown whom Snoop Dogg "shoots" while saying, "One shot, one kill."


The outcome of the Michael Brown saga in Ferguson, Missouri, which began in August 2014, reached a climax in November 2014 when a grand jury did not indict police officer Darren Wilson, and ended with a whimper in March 2015 when the Justice Department saw no basis for bringing civil rights charges, infuriated the left. So it seemed inevitable that a conspiracy theory would emerge attempting to rehabilitate Brown's reputation while planting doubt about the circumstances leading to his death — and one just has.


Demonstrating that the left will risk the reputation and credibility of virtually any of its cherished institutions in the name of defending the biased establishment press against its center-right competitors, the Harvard Library has published "Fake News, Misinformation, and Propaganda," a "research Guide" purporting to offer "a brief introduction to the spread of misinformation of all kinds and tools for identifying it." 


An irony-ignorant skit on the March 11 edition of Saturday Night Live featured a parody commercial portraying Ivanka Trump promoting a perfume called "Complicit." Washington Post writer Aaron Blake covered the episode in an alleged "Analysis" blog post, yet managed to ignore the February success of Ivanka's product line despite a declared leftist boycott and Nordstrom dropping her brand.


In a dispatch accusing the Trump administration of hypocrisy in expressing pleasure over Friday's jobs report from the government's Bureau of Labor Statistics, Associated Press reporters Jill Colvin and Christopher Rugaber, with additional assistance from Jonathan Lemire, either betrayed an amazing collective level of ignorance about what a households is, or were so blinded by the need to criticize Donald Trump that they didn't see how ridiculous they made themselves and their wire service look. The trio's error, shared by their editors if such people even exist any more, is so obvious that one simply has to believe that it's the latter.


On CNN's first airing of Believer, a six-part Sunday evening series described at People.com as a "spiritual adventures series" exploring "the world’s most fascinating faith-based groups," host Reza Aslan did his part to take the network's flagging reputation down even further as he (yes, really) ate part of a human brain. Aslan, who was visiting a fringe, cannibalistic sect which claims to be part of the Hindu faith, says that he made it clear to viewers and online followers that the Aghori sect is "not representative of Hinduism,” but didn't address the real question, which is why he chose to feature it anyway.


Lynne Stewart, whose long legal and illegal career included representing domestic terrorists in the 1980s and relaying a convicted Islamic terrorist's commands to his underlings last decade, died on Tuesday. The Associated Press's Larry Neumeister went out of his way to conceal and sanitize important aspects of Stewart's life and beliefs in his Wednesday afternoon obituary.


There is little doubt that the big economic news Wednesday was payroll and employee benefits giant ADP's estimate that the economy added 298,000 seasonally adjusted private-sector jobs in February. Over seven hours later, the New York Times did not have the news on its website's home page — or even at its "Business Day" business and financial news web page.


On March 1, Reuters used a possibly Photoshopped photo from 2010 from the other side of the continent as it published a genuinely newsworthy story about a continental record-high temperature seen at an Antarctic base on the northern tip of that continent. The wire service's use of that not-credible or relevant photo, and the content of the posted article, attempted to tie this news to so-called global warming, but failed to explain the nonwarming-related meteorological cause of the high temperature reading.


Imagine, if it's even possible to, that in March 2009, former Bush 43 Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez or John Ashcroft had posted a video telling the newly formed grassroots opposition to President Barack Obama's policies that their ancestors "had marched, they’ve bled and yes, some of them died" for their beliefs, and that "We can do this again." We all know that media and establishment reaction to such a posting would have been instant and furious, and unequivocally interpreted as a call to violence — unlike the virtual non-reaction to former Obama AG Loretta Lynch's video, which called for folks sympathetic to her version of American "ideals" to "do this again."


It all started with an ignorant tweet by Vox's Matt Yglesias, who falsely claimed that "It's impressive that the IRS never leaks." The New York Times's Nick Kristof, apparently unaware or indifferent to the fact that he was simultaneously engaging in breathtaking hypocrisy and playing with fire, saw an opportunity to advertise his paper's law-subverting services, and tweeted the paper's physical address to those who are "in IRS and have a certain president's tax return that you'd like to leak."


What everyone knew would happen as a result of Philadelphia's 1.5 cents-per-ounce soda tax began materializing on Wednesday, as Pepsi announced that it would lay off roughly 20 percent of its workforce there over the next several months. Coverage at both Philly.com and Associated Press allowed the city to engage in fantasy by claiming without meaningful challenge, or even clarification, that Pepsi in particular, but clearly other beverage makers by implication, should be using profits earned elsewhere to subsidize their Philly operations.


Late Friday afternoon, Brian Slodysko at the Associated Press published a legitimate but overwrought news story on how Vice President Mike Pence, while Indiana's governor, had "emails about state business distributed from a private AOL account that was hacked last year." But the AP reporter also published Karen Pence's still-active AOL email address for no conceivably justifiable reason. Now the wire service is refusing to pull stories containing it.


Leftists never seem to tire of going to the same page from the "H" section of their playbook, likening anyone who disagrees with them, and especially anyone who threatens their agenda, to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler. In one of the laziest such comparisons yet, Washington Post staff writer Amanda Erickson played the Hitler card in decrying President Donald Trump's move to assist the victims of violent crimes committed by those who are in this nation illegally — because (gasp!) there are going to be published reports on illegal-immigrant crime.


On Thursday, Kristine Marsh at NewsBusters noted that "none of the big three networks or cable news found time" to report Louisiana Democratic Congressman Cedric Richmond's "vile sexual joke" directed the previous evening at Trump presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway. The fact that the establishment press's lead gatekeepers at the Associated Press and the New York Times had no story likely influenced that nonresponse — and despite Richmond's determination to claim that he didn't mean what he really said and refusal to apologize, the gatekeepers still haven't.


There are many reasons to doubt the European Union's long-term continued existence in its current form, not the least of which is that its structure is, as a Friday Investor's Business Daily editorial asserted, "a virtual dictatorship for bureaucrats." As if that authoritarianism isn't enough, the EU Parliament can now financially penalize, censor and even memory-hole its own members' supposedly "offensive" speech — and it's fair to allege that their real objective, with media coopeartion, is to prevent the spread of populism under the guise of outlawing "racist" and "xenophobic" remarks.


It's becoming quite obvious that the Associated Press, which has tilted ever more to the left for several decades, has been on the verge of going completely off the rails since their coordinated plan to elect Hillary Clinton failed in November. Naturally, the AP has directed its ever-increasing hostility at Donald Trump and his administration since that fateful day — seldom more obviously than in Tammy Webber's treatment of Trump's tribute to Ryan and Carryn Owens in his Tuesday speech to a joint session of Congress.


With so much fake news published and broadcast in the establishment press, it apparently was only a matter of time before those who run these organizations would start making brazenly false claims about the size of their audience. The opening sentence of a March 1 NBC news press release claimed that it had the largest combined audience of any news organization during President Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress — and "forgot" to combine Fox's broadcast network audience with that of Fox News.


The Associated Press made a series of weak and biased claims in its woefully inadequate "fact check" published after President Donald Trump's Tuesday evening speech to a joint session of Congress. One of the weakest, qualifying as a "Fake Fact Check," was its contention that Trump's statement that "the vast majority of individuals convicted for terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside of our country," is false, when President's statement could not have been more correct.


A week ago, the Columbus Dispatch reported that Wendy's, the fast-food chain, announced "plans to install self-ordering kiosks in 1,000 of its stores — about 16 percent of its locations — by the end of the year." Although company officials observed 18 months ago that such a move would be inevitable if the trend towards laws demanding far-above-market minimum wages continued, both J.D. Malone's Dispatch story and the Associated Press's condensed version based on Malone's work do not mention minimum wages at all.