Tom Blumer has written for several national online publications  primarily on business, economics, politics and media bias. He has had his own blog,, since 2005, and has been with NewsBusters since December 2005. Along the way, he's had a decades-long career in accounting, finance, training and development.

Latest from Tom Blumer
July 24, 2016, 10:41 PM EDT

In Munich on Friday, 18 year-old Ali David Sonboly gunned down nine people, seven of them teenagers, and injured 35, before killing himself. Though there appears to be no direct connection to nationalist or Islamic groups, witnesses said he screamed "I'm German" and "Allah Akbar" during his killing spree.

The previous paragraph tells readers far more about the massacre than certain news outlets have been willing to report. Two egregious such examples include the Associated Press, which, over 48 hours later, won't even reveal the killer's first or last name, and the BBC, which, until called out by critics, originally scrubbed his first name.

July 22, 2016, 11:01 PM EDT

Early this week, in an MSNBC interview, Tavis Smiley said that there's far too much attention being paid to "cop killers" and not enough to "killer cops."

Then, in a Tuesday USA Today column, he cast his sympathetic lot with Gavin Long, who killed three Baton Rouge police offices on Sunday before a police sharpshooter killed him. Smiley told readers that we should "Listen to the Baton Rouge police killer." Later in the week, he interviewed Corine Woodley, Long's mother, on his PBS show. Woodley's own words indicated that what caused her son to snap was that he bought into both the lies of the violent Black Lives Matter movement and the left's obsession with "the one percent."

July 22, 2016, 12:13 PM EDT

New York Times reporter Farhad Manjoo and his editors apparently are so insulated in their politically correct bubble that they fail to recognize embarrassing text anyone outside of that bubble with two eyes and and ounce of sense can clearly see.

In a Wednesday piece (Thursday print edition, Page B1) designed to portray Republican National Convention speaker, Donald Trump supporter and PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel as an outlier, Manjoo described Silicon Valley as a place of "militant open-mindedness" which will "severely punish any deviations from accepted schools of thought." Manjoo also illustrated how one Silicon Valley executive has allowed that area's culture prevent him from doing his own political homework. These are considered good things in Old Gray Ladyland.

July 22, 2016, 10:30 AM EDT

The headline at Dan Zak's Arts & Entertainment column at the Washington Post early Thursday evening: "We were promised a riot. In Cleveland, we got a block party instead." (There were occasional exceptions.) Though his article's tone was generally positive, he did complain that "Cleveland is basically a police state this week." Gosh, I didn't know police states had so much freedom of speech and expression.

What Zak found was "general comity," which included people giving out hugs and cuddles (seriously), and spontaneous outbursts of live music. So it's worth asking who made the "promise (of) a riot," or at least who built the expectation. To what should be no one's surprise, the Associated Press had a big role.

July 21, 2016, 3:09 PM EDT

Many leftists thought that they would attract huge, unprecedented crowds of protesters and cause a great deal of mayhem at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this week.

Tuesday evening at, Steven Nelson, appearing to assume facts which have thus far not been supported by evidence, wrote that the protest crowds (and arrests) have been light "despite the nomination of Donald Trump eliciting a rage from progressives that rivals or exceeds their hatred of former President George W. Bush." Hmm, Steven. Maybe your premise is wrong. One of the protesters' excuses, at first glance, seems like a real howler — but if it's somehow actually correct, it's an argument to keep Ohio's gun laws exactly as they are, and to ensure that all other states follow suit.

July 20, 2016, 2:46 PM EDT

CBS News has fancied itself as a serious, hard-news operation since the days of Walter Cronkite. For all of its heavily documented bias, and though it's now handicapped compared to its Big Three and Fox competition by not having a cable affiliate, it has generally covered and treated the major party conventions as important national events.

So one would think that someone at what used to be known as the Tiffany Network would have persuaded Stephen Colbert, an alleged comedian who has so completely stopped being funny that his late-night show is regularly finishing at or barely above third in the 18-49 ratings to both Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy Kimmel, to stay away from the site of the Republican National Convention. Nope.

July 19, 2016, 11:56 PM EDT

It's a good thing all those layers of fact-checkers and proofreaders are out there in the establishment press making sure that they don't misinform their readers about the dates and times of impending events.

Oh, wait a minute. Both, the home website of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, and the Associated Press promoted a "Stand Together Against Trump" rally as if it would take place Tuesday afternoon. The problem is that the protest isn't until Thursday. Oops. I guess they were just overanxious.

July 19, 2016, 8:42 PM EDT

Former New Black Panther leader Malik Shabazz, whose incendiary, racist remarks could fill a very long book, was interviewed by Megyn Kelly at Fox News Monday night.

Shabazz has had a long history of establishment media indulgence, which explains how he can now meritlessly present himself as the supposedly respectable head and co-founder of "Black Lawyers for Justice." Fox's choice to give him air time was questionable, but at least Kelly gave him no quarter.

July 18, 2016, 10:03 AM EDT

On Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, former Nightly News anchor Tom Brokaw seemed bewildered and frustrated that race relations in the U.S. haven't improved as much as he hoped they would by now.

Brokaw didn't consider his own network's significant and largely dishonest contribution to this situation during the past nearly 11 years.

July 17, 2016, 8:31 PM EDT

Adam Ragusea, writing at, believes that the word "terrorist" has become "uselessly arbitrary and loaded," because it "has acquired a powerful religious—and specifically Islamic—connotation" that "is substantively consequential."

As a result, Ragusea believes that the Associated Press, whose Stylebook sadly exerts nearly ironclad control over language used in U.S. establishment press journalism, should follow the lead of Reuters and stop using that word. Oh, and based on looking at what Reuters shamefully did with little fanfare, the word "terrorism" also needs to go.

July 17, 2016, 3:23 PM EDT

The Memphis Commercial Appeal died as a genuine newspaper on July 12.

Its journalistic pulse stopped when its editor, Louis Graham, apologized for the paper's three-word front-page headline after the July 7 race-motivated massacre of five Dallas policemen, which read: "Gunman Targeted Whites."

July 16, 2016, 11:41 PM EDT

We are so fortunate to have expert psychoanalyst Judy Woodruff on call at PBS. (That's sarcasm, folks.)

Friday evening, Woodruff, apparently because whatever evidence there is of ISIS involvement in Thursday's terrorist massacre in Nice, France is in her view insufficiently direct, speculated that "It could have been the act of one person disgruntled, upset with his life."

July 16, 2016, 9:24 PM EDT

UPDATE, July 17: The Enquirer corrected the error by removing the related sentence and placing the following "correction" below the article's boilerplate describing the paper's three-part series — "Correction: An earlier version incorrectly stated that 220,000 were murdered last year. The total was since Sept. 11, 2001."

A Cincinnati Enquirer reporter and her editors thoroughly embarrassed themselves and their employer on Friday. Additionally, given that the error involved has been present for over 36 hours, they may not realize it unless and until someone tells them about this post.

The reporter, Jessie Balmert, told readers that the number of murders in the U.S. last year was 15 times higher than it actually was. The Enquirer's editors, assuming they exist (one almost hopes that they don't), were also too ignorant to catch the blatantly obvious but agenda-fitting error.

July 16, 2016, 2:38 PM EDT

The latest installment in leftist excuse-making when socialism fails goes into the "It would work if leaders just had the right people handling things" file. It comes in the form of a Friday morning "analysis" at the Associated Press. Writers Jorge Rueda and Joshua Goodman want readers to believe that the economy in the Bolivarian socialist and once fairly prosperous nation of Venezuela would be in much better shape today if the military didn't botch the responsibilities de facto dictator Nicolas Maduro had previously given it to handle the nation's "battle against widespread food shortages." Now the AP pair believe it will get even worse, because the military has essentially been given total control in this area.

July 15, 2016, 11:42 AM EDT

News of the evening terrorist truck attack in Nice, France first appeared at the Drudge report at 5:06 p.m. U.S. Eastern Time Thursday afternoon. By 5:28, Drudge was linking to an item noting that conducting a terrorist attack with a truck is something "that jihadist propaganda has suggested for several years."

Friday at 12:15 a.m. Eastern Time, hours after it was known that what had occurred was a terrorist attack, a tweet from the intrepid journalists (that's sarcasm, folks) at told readers that the event was a "deadly truck crash."

July 15, 2016, 12:03 AM EDT

It would be far too kind to give three cheers to CNN for exposing the disastrous conditions in a children's hospital in Caracas, Venezuela caused by over 15 years of Bolivarian socialism in a July 13 broadcast report.

The network gets one hearty cheer for the detailed report's existence. It lost a chance for a second cheer when it failed to mention the country's socialist form of government which is directly responsible for these conditions. The third cheer went down the drain when one woman who was interviewed seemed to think that the healthcare system's desperate situation may just as likely be caused by the nation's utterly powerless opposition and not the Chavista government of Nicolas Maduro, where the blame totally and obviously lies.

July 14, 2016, 7:45 PM EDT

At her personal web site's home page, Ebony Magazine Senior Editor Jamilah Lemieux says she is "One of those pesky Black feminists who challenges the status quo, while remaining fresh and fab at all times." "Fresh and fab" would hardly describe Ms. Lemieux's Wednesday appearance on CNN Newsroom, where she took issue with, per the White House, President Barack Obama's characterization of the murders of five Dallas law enforcement officers as "hate crimes." You see, that's not her "most comfortable word choice," because it involved white cops.

July 13, 2016, 6:04 PM EDT

It's a safe prediction that there will be renewed interest in the federal government's perilous financial situation if the country elects someone not named Hillary Clinton as its next president in November.

One reason why this prediction is so safe is how little interest there has been in even covering today's news about Uncle Sam's troubling June surplus of only $6.3 billion. The Associated Press, via Martin Crutsinger, devoted three whole paragraphs to the news during the first two hours after its release before lengthening it with the usual static analysis pablum about the presidential candidates' tax plans. A 4:30 p.m. Eastern Time Google News search on "deficit," which encouraged users to "Explore in Depth (9 more articles)," returned only three additional items when I followed that suggestion.

July 12, 2016, 11:52 PM EDT

Tuesday's coverage at the Associated Press of the deepening humanitarian crisis in the Bolivarian socialist disaster known as Venezuela focused on the conditions in the ever-lengthening lines its citizens must endure in hopes of obtaining enough of the basics of everyday life just to survive.

Wire service reports often start off relatively brief and expand as reporters gather more information. That didn't happen with the AP's three Tuesday reports. Instead, Hannah Dreier's opening 11:51 a.m. Eastern Time dispatch was lengthy, with many compelling emotional and economic details. The second version of her report over an hour later was almost cut in half, and lost most of its power as a result. A final unbylined story at 3:39 p.m. — the one which most of AP's subscribers appear to have decided to carry — contained only 10 paragraphs, and even failed to note that the country whose people are now spending an average of 35 hours a week in line, and where 90 percent are saying they "can't buy enough to eat," is socialist.

July 11, 2016, 5:25 PM EDT

In a Sunday front-page report at the New York Times, Patrick Healy, who has been covering the presidential race almost exclusively for well over a year, complained that neither major party's presidential frontrunner appears to have the capacity to be "a unifying candidate." After all, as his story's headline indicated, somebody, right now, needs "to Be (a) Unifying Voice for (the) Nation."

Hold on there, Patrick. Since when did it become the job of private citizens, neither of whom currently holds political office, to pull the country together when we have a President named Barack Obama who is supposed to be handling that task?