By Tom Blumer | July 2, 2016 | 1:46 PM EDT

In its coverage of Egypt's declaration of a national holiday to mark the ouster of Islamist dictator Mohammed Morsi (also spelled "Mursi") three years ago, the Associated Press recast history. It completely ignored Morsi's assumption of de facto dictatorial powers only months after he was "freely elected" in 2012, his government's brutal repression while he was in power, and his Muslim Brotherhood's attempt to ramrod sharia law and socialism into the country's constitution and legal framework.

The wire service, by noting that "millions of Egyptians took to the streets on June 30 (2013), to call for Morsi to step down," also effectively admitted that it attempted to downplay the size of the protest crowds in its original reporting three years ago. Most other news services accurately reported at the time that "millions" had taken to the streets throughout Egypt, while the AP would only acknowledge "hundreds of thousands."

By Tom Blumer | March 26, 2016 | 12:00 AM EDT

If we had today's establishment press covering America just before the Revolution, few would have learned of Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty or give me to death!" If they had been covering the Revolutionary War itself, there would have been a blackout on Nathan Hale's "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country."

Today's establishment press does anything and everything it can to keep important statements by people it despises out of the news. Thus, despite regularly perusing media outlets on a daily basis, it is intensely frustrating that I only learned about Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's unforgettable five-word fundamental truth about Islamic terrorism by reading an Investor's Business Daily editorial.

By Tom Blumer | March 10, 2016 | 8:08 PM EST

Those not well-versed on events in the Middle East and how the international press routinely distorts its coverage there might think from the following headline at CNN.com yesterday — "American fatally stabbed in Israel terror attack that wounds 10 others" — that the state of Israel carried out the brutal attack which killed Vanderbilt Universtity student and U.S. Army veteran Taylor Force.

Of course, that's not the case. But it took the trio of CNN reporters who covered the story — Oren Liebermann, Steve Almasy and Amir Tal — a full 20 paragraphs before finally acknowledging that the attacker was Palestinian: "Israeli police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld tweeted that the attacker, a Palestinian from the West Bank, was fatally shot by police."

By Brad Wilmouth | February 26, 2016 | 6:23 PM EST

Appearing as a guest on Friday's Fox and Friends, FNC's Geraldo Rivera touted GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump as "the reasonable man on the stage" at last night's presidential debate, and went on to praise Trump's "unparalleled courage" for taking a position of neutrality on the Arab-Israeli conflict.

By Matthew Balan | January 29, 2016 | 11:56 PM EST

Friday's World News Tonight set aside the least amount of air time to the State Department's revelation that at least 22 of the e-mails on Hillary Clinton's private e-mail server contained top-secret information. The ABC program devoted a total of one minute and 28 seconds to the development. Jonathan Karl folded his coverage of the story into a segment about the Democratic presidential race in Iowa. Less than half of the correspondent's report — one minute and 10 seconds — dealt with the ongoing scandal.

By Alexa Moutevelis Coombs | December 7, 2015 | 5:26 AM EST

BOOM! Hollywood just dropped some truth about Hamas’ tactic of trying to get as many Palestinian civilians killed as they can for propaganda purposes in its war against Israel! On the 10th episode of ABC’s Quantico, Nimah Anwar, a Lebanese Muslim, attempts to impugn the integrity of Simon Asher, an American Jew, by revealing the truth about his relationship with Israel - and fails miserably.

By Tom Blumer | November 30, 2015 | 12:23 PM EST

In predictably disingenuous fashion, the Associated Press claimed in a November 18 story that "Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has shined new light on the breakdown of a potentially history-altering round of 2008 peace talks." Abbas acknowledged that Israel offered Palestinians 93.5 percent of the West Bank and other significant concessions.

The "light" isn't "new" at all. The wire service had the news almost seven years ago, and, according to former AP reporters, refused to publish it. An AP reporter who "discovered the Israeli peace offer in early 2009, got it confirmed on the record and brought it" to the AP in Jerusalem has substantiated the assertion that it "suppressed a world-changing story for no acceptable reason." It is perhaps the most damming validation yet that prudent people should never trust establishment press reports out of the Middle East — particularly in regards to Israel — because of their "pattern ... of accepting the Palestinian narrative as truth and branding the Israelis as oppressors."

By Tom Blumer | October 17, 2015 | 12:29 PM EDT

Based on a map presented during a recent MSNBC broadcast, I'm left wondring why there's all this hand-wringing over a "two state solution" in the Middle East.

After all, according to that MSNBC map and the host of the program involved, "Palestine" has been around for almost 70 years, existing since 1946 (HT Sooper Mexican at the Right Scoop):

By Tom Blumer | October 10, 2015 | 9:42 AM EDT

In an October 8 item at the New York Times ("Historical Certainty Proves Elusive at Jerusalem’s Holiest Place"), reporter Rick Gladstone pretended that it's an open question as to "whether" the two Jewish temples — one destroyed over 2,500 years ago and the second razed in roughly 60 A.D., ever existed on the 37-acre site known as the Temple Mount. In doing so, Gladstone gave credibility to Palestinians baselessly promoting "doubt that the temples ever existed — at least in that location."

There is no meaningful "doubt" on the subject at all. After what must have been a furious and completely justified backlash, the Times issued a correction on Friday (bold is mine):

By Tom Blumer | September 20, 2015 | 6:28 PM EDT

A year ago, Tim Graham at NewsBusters noted that the New York Times was "offering 13-day tours of Iran guided by Times journalist Elaine Sciolino" at the bargain rate of $6,995 per person. Among other things, it promised "excellent insights into ... (the) life and accomplishments" of Ayatollah Khomeini, the ruthless Islamist leader who posed as a liberator, but then imposed a fundamentalist Islamic state after taking control of that country in the late 1970s. Those tours are still active, and popular.

Given that background, I suppose we really shouldn't be all that surprised that Ira Stoller at SmarterTimes.com reported a related development this morning. With the imminent lifting of Western sanctions against Iran, the ever-opportunistic International division of the Times is cohosting an October 6-7 "Oil and Money" conference in London (I promise, I'm not making this up). 

By Tom Blumer | September 16, 2015 | 10:53 PM EDT

Nowhere is the anti-Israel bias of so much of the establishment press more evident than in its coverage of terror attacks and crimes committed by Palestinians.

One such example occurred almost a year ago in the Associated Press. In that instance, the story concerned a Palestinian who drove his car into a crowd and killed a three-month old baby girl. He was in turn shot and killed by the police when he tried to flee. The AP's initial headline read: "Israeli police shoot man in east Jerusalem." On Tuesday, the New York Times got into the act in a big way, in a headline and story by Diaa Hadid which gave rocks, which are after all inanimate objects, extraordinary powers (HT Kevin Williamson at National Review via Instapundit; bolds and numbered tags are mine):

By Tom Blumer | September 4, 2015 | 11:58 PM EDT

On Thursday, the Associated Press published the equivalent of press release promoting a pro-Muslim billboard campaign orchestrated by the Islamic Circle of North America.

The writeup's author, Rasha Madkour, failed to get any kind of skeptical comment from anyone about the nature of the campaign, and utterly failed to tell readers anything about the Islamic Circle's or its spokesperson's past (and possibly still-present) terrorist ties. Instead, readers were given the equivalent of a feel-good story about members trying to "reclaim the message" of Islam.