By Kristine Marsh | May 20, 2016 | 11:14 AM EDT

Add “Marxist extremist” “Islamic radical” and “murderer sympathizer” to the list of controversial people Google finds worthy of celebrating. The major tech company and search engine decided to use yesterday’s “doodle” to honor Yuri Kochiyama, a Japanese-American radical who converted to Islam and considered terrorists and cop-killers her heroes. Google’s post solidifies the company’s stance of promoting radical leftist icons and ideas while scorning mainstream and traditional American heroes and holidays.

By Sam Dorman | May 18, 2016 | 11:15 AM EDT

CNBC anchor Joe Kernen tore into the prospect of a socialist president, and knocked young people who he said had a warped view of Bernie Sanders. Kernen’s comments came in response to a report by political correspondent John Harwood on the democratic presidential race. In his report, Harwood featured a poll that had Sanders losing to Clinton by 14 percentage points.

By Clay Waters | May 13, 2016 | 11:35 AM EDT

On Thursday the New York Times ran a worshipful obituary for Michael Ratner, former president of the Center for Constitutional Rights, a hard-left outfit founded by radical lawyer William Kunstler. The obituary by Sam Roberts appeared under an adulatory headline, “Michael Ratner, Bold Civil Liberties Lawyer, Dies at 72.”

Left out of Roberts’ report? Ratner's solidary with Cuba's Communist dictator Fidel Castro, his adulatory book on murderous Communist thug Che Guevara, and this gem from December 2005 during the Bush administration’s war in Iraq: "The Bush administration has moved us from a government responsible and accountable to the people to one that dictates to the people. Every American should be in political rebellion against the criminals now running this country."

By Sam Dorman | May 13, 2016 | 9:50 AM EDT

CNBC anchors Joe Kernen and Michelle Caruso Cabrera poked fun at socialism, saying it equalized results, but made everything worse.

Cabrera said on Squawk Box May 12, that socialism brought about “equal suffering,” while Kernen similarly remarked that it represented “equally-shared misery.”

By Tom Blumer | April 29, 2016 | 12:44 AM EDT

Venezuela's hyperinflationary economic crisis has gotten worse in one very important and apparently unprecedented sense than even the one seen in Weimar Germany in the 1920s. Yet the Associated Press and the New York Times apparently have no interest in telling their readers, listeners or viewers about it.

In the post-World War I German Weimar Republic, the situation became so out of control that people needed wheelbarrows to carry around the money they needed to pay for basic everyday purchases. A Bloomberg News story published early Wednesday morning, i.e., in plenty of time for the rest of the world's press to notice the story by now, has a similar "wheelbarrows" reference to Venezuela's crisis. But there's more. Venezuela doesn't even the money to pay to keep those wheelbarrows stocked with ever more worthless cash.

By Tom Blumer | April 18, 2016 | 11:13 PM EDT

Earlier today, Tim Graham at NewsBusters covered a poll done by an Associated Press-led partnership which found that, in AP's words, "Just 6 percent of people say they have a lot of confidence in the media, putting the news industry about equal to Congress and well below the public's view of other institutions."

The poll noted that "Nearly 90 percent of Americans say it's extremely or very important that the media get their facts correct." How ironic it therefore is that the Pulitzer prize announcements this afternoon contained two glaring failures to "get facts correct."

By Tom Blumer | March 31, 2016 | 2:09 PM EDT

Wednesday morning, Tim Graham at NewsBusters observed how pseudo-conservative David Brooks, who is no fan of Donald Trump, gave the current GOP frontrunner credit for having "destroyed a dying husk" of "obsolete Reagan ideology" in the Republican Party.

That's fascinating stuff, given the catch of the day by Instapundit's Ed Driscoll. You see, 12 years ago, Brooks gave Reagan credit for having transformed the party and conservatism "from a past- and loss-oriented movement to a future- and possibility-oriented one." In other words, even Dense David recognized at the time that Reagan's positive tone and belief in American exceptionalism — a term which the left, up to and including President Obama, has tried to ridicule out of existence — were the foundation for how Reagan, in Brooks's words, "embraced America as a revolutionary force."

By Tom Johnson | March 27, 2016 | 2:20 PM EDT

Conservatives have objected in droves to a remark President Obama made this past week during his visit to Argentina. Addressing a gathering of young adults, Obama said, “In the past there’s been a sharp division…between capitalist and communist or socialist…but I think for your generation, you should be practical and just choose from what works.”

The right’s hostile response, contended The Washington Monthly's David Atkins in a Saturday post, is indicative of its longstanding “failure to acknowledge policy realities…The leadership and media organs of the conservative movement remain obsessed with promoting ideology over practicality so much that [Obama’s comment] somehow becomes a fundamental betrayal.” Long ago, wrote Atkins, “capitalism won the war of ideas and appropriately so—but that doesn’t mean it’s a perfect system. Modern Republicans have totally lost sight of that fact.”

By Tom Blumer | March 26, 2016 | 10:53 AM EDT

As noted in my previous post, the press is determined that the world not learn of profound statements made by world leaders it despises. The specific reference was to Israeli Prime Mininster Benjamin Netanyahu's five-word admonishment to those who believe that some accommodation can be reached with Islamic terrorists: "Terrorists Have No Resolvable Grievances."

Meanwhile, the press protects those it likes when they make breathtakingly ignorant remarks. Such remarks occur with alarming regularity any time U.S. President Barack Obama speaks without the aid of a teleprompter. In Argentina on Wednesday, during a question-answer exchange with a youth group, Obama said that debates over the superiority of capitalism compared to communism "are interesting intellectual arguments," but that "for your generation, you should be practical and just choose from what works." Press coverage of Obama's remarks has been sparse.

By Tom Blumer | March 24, 2016 | 1:27 AM EDT

Bob Ley, ESPN's longest-serving commentator, was in Cuba yesterday after the Tampa Bay Rays defeated the island nation's national team 4-1 in an exhibition baseball game.

Shortly after the conclusion of that game, ESPN had Ley report from a rather nice-looking streetscape in Havana (not your typical avenue in the workers' paradise). As he did, a demonstrator interrupted him. ESPN, acting as if it believes it's a sovereign nation unto itself, headlined the incident: "Protester invades SportsCenter in Cuba."

By Tom Johnson | March 22, 2016 | 11:06 AM EDT

Quite a few conservatives were incensed over the photo of President Obama and other officials, including John Kerry and at least one of Cuba’s many vice presidents, standing against the backdrop of a several-stories-tall steel relief mural of Che Guevara. Consequently, quite a few liberals told those conservatives, in effect, to get a life.

One of those liberals was Steve Benen, the primary blogger for the TRMS website. In a Monday post, Benen suggested that objectors to the photo are dead-enders who don’t or can’t understand that “the debate over U.S. policy towards Cuba has effectively been resolved.” He sniped, “The president’s critics haven’t had much success pointing to problems with the administration’s policy, but they’re apparently apoplectic about a photograph…Before your crazy uncle who watches Fox all day sends you an all-caps email, it’s worth taking a deep breath.”

By Curtis Louder | March 22, 2016 | 12:06 AM EDT

If you haven't had a chance to watch the premiere season of USA’s Colony then you have missed some really well done television. The good news is you have plenty of time to binge all ten episodes, as it is not slated to begin season two until 2017.