By Tom Blumer | December 4, 2016 | 11:15 PM EST

A funny thing happened on the way to delivering Fidel Castro's ashes to their final resting place. According to an Associated Press photo caption, soldiers had to "push the jeep and trailer carrying the ashes of the late Fidel Castro after the jeep briefly stopped working during Castro’s funeral procession near Moncada Fort in Santiago, Cuba."

FoxNews.com had a sense of the symbolism: "The breakdown of the jeep in the midst of adoring crowds chanting 'Long live Fidel!' was symbolic of the dual nature of Castro's Cuba." AP news reports did not. They were too busy being awestruck by the "near-religious farewell to the man who ruled the country for nearly 50 years" to mention such a contradictory detail.

By Tom Johnson | November 29, 2016 | 9:48 AM EST

There’s cross-ideological agreement that Tom Morello (currently of Prophets of Rage, formerly of Rage Against the Machine and Audioslave) is a superb guitarist. It’s a different story when it comes to his political acumen, which some would say is about as impressive as the singing talent of Florence Foster Jenkins. Morello, a staunch leftist who’s given to comments such as “words like ‘socialism’ and ‘Marxism’ have been so demonized that it's difficult to have intelligent discussion about what they mean,” was at it again in a Saturday Instagram post concerning the death of Fidel Castro, writing that “by defying Yankee imperialism for 50 years, instituting the best healthcare, child immunization and literacy systems in the Western Hemisphere (surpassing the US and Canada), exporting doctors to countries in need all over the globe…and being an unrepentant advocate of the poor and exploited it is no surprise that millions will mourn [Castro's] passing.”

By Nicholas Fondacaro | November 28, 2016 | 9:52 PM EST

The Monday night after ABC reported Fidel Castro’s death live from Havana, Cuba, World News Tonight paid little mind to the Cuban exiles in Miami, Florida celebrating the death of the tyrant. Instead Anchor David Muir rambled on as he hyped his flight home from Havana to Miami. “Our journey back beginning at the Havana airport where we learned we would be boarding the first commercial flight from Havana to Miami in decades,” Muir said as he we visibly excited to receive his inaugural certificate.

By Kyle Drennen | November 28, 2016 | 4:41 PM EST

Appearing on MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports on Monday, Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson warned President-elect Donald Trump against reversing President Obama’s executive order opening diplomatic relations with Cuba. The liberal pundit argued that putting pressure on the authoritarian regime would be “the one thing that could keep Fidel Castro, metaphorically, and his revolution alive and his system of oppression alive...”

By Tom Blumer | November 28, 2016 | 12:19 PM EST

How ironic it is that the announced death of Cuban Communist dictator Fidel Castro late Friday night coincides with the U.S. establishment press's obsession with smearing websites which dare to challenge their narratives as Russian-inspired "fake news."

Castro's original rise to power was arguably the product of a spectacularly fake dispatch written nearly six decades ago by reporter Herbert L. Matthews and published in the New York Times.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | November 27, 2016 | 4:13 PM EST

During a Sunday filled with liberal media elites praising dead communist dictator Fidel Castrol, CBS’s Face the Nation was no different. CBS consultant Julia Sweig seemed to write off the focus on Castro’s atrocities, “There is the analyst that will say look this guy took power, shutdown speech, put people in prison, had a human rights legacy that was quite challenging and difficult for many people who were on the other end of it.” 

By Tom Blumer | November 27, 2016 | 4:01 PM EST

Geraldo Rivera is far from the only member of the U.S. press with what Fox News's Pete Hegseth described Saturday as a "reflexive desire" to see Communist dictator Fidel Castro, whose death was announced Friday night, as a "cult hero." Entire major U.S. news outlets fell prey decades ago.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | November 27, 2016 | 1:47 PM EST

In the wake of the death of Cuba’s brutal dictator, Fidel Castro, President Barack Obama released a statement that failed to condemn him for his crimes. The statement left NBC’s Meet The Press moderator Chuck Todd perplexed on Sunday, asking The New York Times’ Helene Cooper “Why was it so positive?” Cooper blamed Todd’s confusion on “a very Americano-centric view of Cuba,” and argued that Obama had a more nuanced understanding of Castro.

By Nicholas Fondacaro | November 27, 2016 | 10:03 AM EST

Following the death of communist butcher Fidel Castro on Black Friday, the Cuban exiles and their descendants took to the streets of Little Havana in Miami, Florida to celebrate the turning point for Cuba. But on NBC’s Sunday Today, reporter Andrea Mitchell glowed about the communist leader and shared her memories of him. “[Castro] was a voracious reader … And very, very aware of everything that was going on, very, very smart and very wedded to his revolutionary ideology,” Mitchell opined from Havana, Cuba. 

By Tom Blumer | November 26, 2016 | 6:01 PM EST

In a Saturday morning appearance on Fox & Friends, Geraldo Rivera, who interviewed Fidel Castro in 1977 when he worked at ABC News, mostly defended the Cuban dictator whose death was announced Friday night.

Rivera, while admitting earlier in the five-minute segment that "Communism stinks, we all know that," and that "Communism cannot compete with capitalism," nevertheless insisted in the segment's second half that the "all awful" view of Castro is "simplistic," and that "he will be remembered fondly" by the Cuban people.

By Brent Baker | November 26, 2016 | 3:52 AM EST

Fidel Castro was a tyrant who oppressed Cubans and brought misery to many for several decades and while much of the breaking news coverage emphasized that reality, some journalists couldn’t resist crediting him for supposed great advancements in education, literacy and health care. ABC’s Jim Avila went so far as to tout how Castro “was considered, even to this day, the George Washington of his country” and, reminiscing about his high school years, Chris Matthews asserted Castro was “a romantic figure when he came into power” who “was almost like a folk hero to most of us.”

By Tom Blumer | November 14, 2016 | 10:52 PM EST

William Finnegan's lengthy report from Venezuela in the November 14 edition of the New Yorker begs two obvious questions: Where have you guys been? And why did you wait until the wee hours on November 7, the day before Election Day in the U.S., when almost everyone's attention was on the presidential and other contests, to post it online?

The report's headline asks a question: "How did this happen?" Finnegan fails to satisfactorily answer it. Instead, he wants readers to believe that the country began an inexorable downhill slide many years before Hugo Chavez took over Venezuela's government and embarked on his Bolivarian socialist "revolution." It wasn't inevitable, but his telling of the story contains implicit warnings applicable to the U.S. which the magazine appears to have decided that its left-leaning readers didn't need to see before they voted.