Latest Posts

By Jack Coleman | August 29, 2012 | 4:10 PM EDT

I love it when Ed Schultz lapses into candor.

Here he is introducing former Obama press flack and campaign advisor Robert Gibbs on his radio show yesterday in a way that seemed to catch Gibbs off guard, but understandably so when you hear what Schultz said (audio) --

By Matthew Sheffield | August 29, 2012 | 3:25 PM EDT

Notorious PBS liberal Gwen Ifill took to Twitter to defend David Chalian, the former Yahoo Washington bureau chief who was fired for claiming that Mitt and Ann Romney are "happy to have a party with black people drowning," claiming that he was unjustly fired. Her defense was markedly over-the-top:

"One mistake does not change this. @DavidChalian is God's gift to political journalism. #IStandwithDavid"

By Clay Waters | August 29, 2012 | 3:10 PM EDT

New York Times Editorial Page editor Andrew Rosenthal displayed his usual class, charm, and mastery of current events in his Twitter posts leading up to and through the start of the Republican National Convention in Tampa.

Before Tuesday night, Rosenthal didn't seem very clued in to the news, posting this on Monday: "If the GOPers love Chris Christie so much, why is he scheduled to speak tomorrow after 10 pm, when no one will be watching? Some keynote." He later stated: "Was wrong before about the timing of Christie speech. 10-11 is prime time for convention. Hope nothing really good on at that time." Oops.

By Mark Finkelstein | August 29, 2012 | 2:55 PM EDT

To know Barack Obama is not necessarily to love him. But MSM politics run deeper than water.  So suggests Michael Medved.  In an interview with NewsBusters today, the author and radio talk show host said that whereas there's not much "affection or respect" for President Obama in the White House press corps, they are still "ideologically committed to him."

That said, whereas an adoring press helped push Barack Obama to victory in 2008, Medved is convinced that Mitt Romney has an excellent chance of defeating Obama in November.  So optimistic is Medved, that he has just released an eBook, The Odds Against Obama, making his case.  View the interview video after the jump.

By Noel Sheppard | August 29, 2012 | 2:39 PM EDT

"The media has been overtaken by the Obama administration in no less a way than Hugo Chavez took over media in Venezuela.”

Such was said Wednesday by actor Jon Voight during a Spreecast with Steve Malzberg (video follows with transcribed highlights, relevant section nine minutes in):

By Clay Waters | August 29, 2012 | 2:29 PM EDT

New York Times reporter Michael Cooper's brief "Caucus" story for Wednesday's edition (not yet online), "'You Didn't Build That,' But He Wasn't Saying That," is yet another tiresome defense of the president from the paper's objective journalists, claiming Obama didn't really mean what came out of his mouth in a speech in Roanoke, Va.: "If you've got a business -- you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen."

(Cooper's cop-out follows similar strained efforts by Times reporters Trip Gabriel and Michael Shear to defend the president against an effective line of attack from the GOP.)

By Tim Graham | August 29, 2012 | 2:15 PM EDT

NPR's idea of Republican convention coverage is to expose Mitt Romney as a flip-flopping fraud flirting with the "extremist camp within the Republican Party." On the very liberal show Fresh Air on Tuesday, host Terry Gross brought on two Boston Globe reporters who've penned an expose called The Real Romney. They talked for 43 and a half minutes.

Veteran Globe editor Michael Kranish found “disaster” in the GOP platform “which takes a very hard line on abortion, and he's picked Paul Ryan, who in the past has voiced a very hard line on abortion....And it's a disaster on the left and certainly in the center because Mitt Romney wants to talk about the economy.” Gross also wanted the Boston authors to trash Romney for his birth-certificate joke, and expose Romney's polygamous Mexico-based ancestors:

By Matthew Sheffield | August 29, 2012 | 1:44 PM EDT

Yahoo has fired its Washington bureau chief David Chalian after NewsBusters exclusively revealed his offensive remarks that Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his wife Ann were "happy to have a party with black people drowning."

Chalian made the comment during a live webcast of the Republican National Convention in Tampa. Here is Yahoo's statement:

By Tim Graham | August 29, 2012 | 1:26 PM EDT

The online aggregator Fark.com asked “We need an entire article, from a major newspaper, on how fat Chris Christie is?” The newspaper was the Los Angeles Times, and media reporter James Rainey was playing with the weight issue. The headline was "Chris Christie, the Republican heavyweight, is really heavy."

“Those getting their first impression of Christie will be comparing him to a battalion of toned and tanned politicians. The ascendance of one with (in Christie’s own words) a ‘big, fat rear end’ may come as a relief,” he wrote. Rainey wanted readers to know Christie is getting even fatter this year:

By Rich Noyes | August 29, 2012 | 12:56 PM EDT

Appearing during the 8am hour of CBS This Morning, former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani scoffed when co-host Charlie Rose suggested the flurry of national security leaks coming from the Obama administration were not aimed at making the President “look like a superhero.”

Giuliani laughed at him: “Oh, come on, Charlie. Why are you leaking all this stuff that shouldn’t be talked about, shouldn’t be discussed? The only reason you’re doing it is to try to make the President look good on foreign policy.” [Video after the jump]

By Ken Shepherd | August 29, 2012 | 12:55 PM EDT

As you may be well aware, MSNBC did not air Democrat-turned-Republican Artur Davis's speech last night. Shortly before 10 p.m. Eastern, anchor Rachel Maddow seemed to offer the network's rationale: Davis was a low-profile Democrat who is just bitter because he was "absolutely destroyed" in his primary race for Alabama governor in 2010.

Yet in the very next breath, Maddow seemed positively giddy that the Democrats had landed former Gov. Charlie Crist (D-Fla.) to speak at their convention next week. There was no mention that he too was being so thoroughly and "absolutely destroyed" by Marco Rubio in the primary election polls in 2010 that he dropped out of the GOP primary in order to run as an independent. He of course, subsequently lost to Rubio in the general election by 19 percentage points. [MP3 audio here; video embedded below page break]

By Tom Blumer | August 29, 2012 | 12:46 PM EDT

On August 27, PolitiFact, the once promising but now largely co-opted "fact check" site run by the Tampa Bay Times, finally got around to evaluating Obama campaign spokesperson Stephanie Cutter's August 22 lie that "over the past, you know, 27 months we've created ... more jobs than in the Bush recovery, in the Reagan recovery." Apparently, the evaluators lost their matches as they only gave Cutter's statement a "False" tag.

In doing so, PolitiFact clearly ignored its own rating guidelines, wherein "False" means that "The statement is not accurate," while "Pants on Fire" means "The statement is not accurate and makes a ridiculous claim." Cutter made an utterly ridiculous claim, which I will illustrate beyond what was already shown on Sunday (at NewsBusters; at BizzyBlog):

By Kyle Drennen | August 29, 2012 | 11:57 AM EDT

During a panel discussion on Wednesday's NBC Today, advertising executive Donny Deutsch ripped into Republican National Convention keynote speaker and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie: "I'm gonna talk about the Christie brand. Bullying will never be accepted across this country....If you're a woman, if you're a minority...they don't want somebody up there going, 'This is the way it is.' His brand will never sell to the country." [Listen to the audio or watch the video after the jump]

Co-host Savannah Guthrie attempted to present a different perspective: "It's interesting you say that, because one man's bullying is another man's straight talk." Deutsch immediately dismissed any such point of view: "No, it's not...no, this is a bully....This guy will never, ever get elected President of the United States. Remember I told you that....this brand will never sell."

By Scott Whitlock | August 29, 2012 | 11:56 AM EDT

All three morning shows, Wednesday, pounded Marco Rubio, forcing him to defend a supposedly anti-Hispanic Republican Party and explain that the GOP won't destroy Medicare. CBS This Morning anchor Charlie Rose lectured, "...Many people worry that people who are Hispanic, African-American and other minorities don't have a place in this party." [See video below. MP3 audio here.]

He continued, "[Your party is] becoming something that is more narrow rather than outreaching." On ABC's Good Morning America, George Stephanopoulos pushed the same liberal talking point. He quoted Antonio Villaraigosa, the Democratic mayor of Los Angeles, parroting "He [Villaraigosa] said you can't just trot out a brown face or as Spanish surname and expect people to vote for your candidate. He was referring to you tomorrow night."

By Ken Shepherd | August 29, 2012 | 10:42 AM EDT

Most Americans don't watch the coverage of party nominating conventions, and everyone in the media knows it. So as a public service,  "NBC Politics team has curated some of the notable speeches from the first night of the Republican National Convention in Tampa," according to a late night August 28 post on NBCNews.com website.

While NBC has the resources to embed videos of EVERY speech from last night, it decided to judge which ones were "notable." Wouldn't you know it, the speech of Artur Davis -- the former Democratic congressman from Alabama who seconded Barack Obama's nomination for the presidency at the Democratic convention in 2008 -- was not included in the list.