Nets Hail ‘History’ for Hillary, Urge Sanders to Get Out

On Tuesday, all three network morning shows celebrated the news that Hillary Clinton had won enough delegates to become the presumptive Democratic nominee. At the top of NBC’s Today, co-host Savannah Guthrie heralded: “Making history. NBC News declares Hillary Clinton the presumptive nominee. The first woman in history to be nominated on a major party ticket.”

In the report that followed minutes later, correspondent Kristen Welker declared: “This is an historic moment eight years in the making. Secretary Clinton becoming the first woman ever to clinch her party's nomination....making her mark on history.”

In a panel discussion after Welker’s segment, co-host Matt Lauer told everyone to forget about Clinton’s struggle to defeat Bernie Sanders in the remaining primary states: “Can we just take a second to stop and recognize history here? I mean, this is a big deal.” MSNBC host Steve Kornacki agreed: “This is the first woman who will ever been nominated by a major party for President of the United States....That is a major achievement.”

Leading off ABC’s Good Morning America, co-host George Stephanopoulos cheered: “Hillary Clinton makes history, clinching the Democratic nomination for president, winning the support of delegates who will make her the first female nominee of a major party.” Correspondent Cecilia Vega gushed:

Overnight, Hillary Clinton securing enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination. Making history as the first woman in the country to become the presumptive nominee of a major political party....Clinton's late night star-studded L.A. fundraiser, from Stevie wonder to Christina Aguilera, now feeling more like a victory party.

Stephanopoulos then conducted a softball interview with House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and fawned: “You were the first female Speaker of the House....What does it mean to have the first female nominee for a major party?”

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On CBS This Morning, co-host Charlie Rose applauded: “Hillary Clinton makes history. She is the first woman to become the Democratic presumptive nominee for president.” Introducing a report moments later, he reiterated: “For the first time in American history, a woman is the presumptive presidential nominee of a major political party.”

Correspondent Nancy Cordes observed: “It was on this day eight years ago that Clinton conceded to then-Senator Barack Obama. Now, she's the presumptive nominee.” A soundbite ran of Clinton telling supporters: “We are on the brink of a historic, historic, unprecedented moment.”

In a discussion with former Face the Nation moderator Bob Schieffer at the top of the 8 a.m. ET hour, co-host Norah O’Donnell announced: “We should note – I mean, this is a historic moment for our country and for the Democratic Party.” Schieffer replied: “It really is. I mean, the first woman to be nominated for president and all that. You really can't make too much of that. That's kind of a big thing.”

While the networks basked in the “history,” all three broadcasts still fretted over Bernie Sanders remaining in the Democratic race and demanded he get out of Clinton’s way. On Today, Guthrie asked: “Bernie Sanders, what is his rationale for saying he needs to take this to the convention? Even President Obama is calling him. We don't know what that conversation was, but it seems to be nudging him through the stages of grief so that the Democratic Party can move on.”

Political analyst Nicolle Wallace asserted: “You can nudge him all you want, there has been no rationale for Bernie Sanders' political effort since March 15th. There has been no mathematical path for Bernie Sanders to topple Hillary Clinton for months now.”

On GMA, co-host Robin Roberts worried: “Hillary Clinton says she's on the brink of history, but as we've been saying...Bernie Sanders, he's not calling it quits. And many are wondering why he's staying in, whether he really has a chance here.” Putting aside the very real possibility that Clinton could lose the California primary underway, correspondent Jon Karl assured: “Well, Robin, if you look at the numbers, Hillary Clinton does have it wrapped up.”

In a panel discussion on This Morning, Cordes turned up the “pressure” on Sanders to quit:

But he's got a lot of pressure now from, as we know, the White House. But things are going to change tomorrow. You're going to have a flood of endorsements and donations coming Hillary Clinton's way. And with that comes a lot of pressure that has not been on Bernie Sanders up until this point to change his argument. Big wigs in the Democratic Party, leaders who he respects, saying out loud in public, “It's really time, Bernie, to step aside and acknowledge that Hillary Clinton is the presumptive nominee...”

Later on the show, Schieffer went so far as to rant: “I mean, just trying to shake somebody like Bernie Sanders, you know, who has never sought office as a Democrat before. And yet, he's been like gum on your shoe, you just can’t get him off of you. And it’s just gone on and on...”

Here are transcripts of the three June 7 reports on NBC, ABC, and CBS:

Today
7:00 AM ET TEASE:

SAVANNAH GUTHRIE: Making history. NBC News declares Hillary Clinton the presumptive nominee. The first woman in history to be nominated on a major party ticket.

HILLARY CLINTON: According to the news, we are on the brink of a historic, historic unprecedented moment.

GUTHRIE: But Bernie Sanders holds on, even after a call from President Obama.

BERNIE SANDERS: We're going to go into that convention with enormous momentum.

GUTHRIE: As voters in six states head to the polls today. The big prize, California, where the race could not be tighter.

7:02 AM ET SEGMENT:

SAVANNAH GUTHRIE: But first, we better start with politics. The race for the White House is our top story. And after reaching that magic number of delegates, the presumptive nominee, Hillary Clinton, has another reason to smile this morning. A brand-new NBC News/SurveyMonkey online poll, shows 48% of respondents would vote for Clinton if the presidential election happened today. She edges out Donald Trump by four points in this latest poll.  

But with the former Secretary of State poised to make history tonight, what does that mean for Bernie Sanders and a still-fractured Democratic Party? We’ve got complete coverage. We'll start with NBC’s Kristen Welker, on the trail for us this morning. Hey, Kristen, good morning.  

KRISTEN WELKER: Hey, Savannah, good morning to you. This is an historic moment eight years in the making. Secretary Clinton becoming the first woman ever to clinch her party's nomination. But she’s not declaring victory yet, Senators Sanders isn’t even accepting the results. And this morning, they both have the same message to the folks who live in those six primary states – get out and vote.

Hillary Clinton making her mark on history.

HILLARY CLINTON: According to the news, we are on the brink of a historic, historic unprecedented moment.

WELKER: NBC News projecting Clinton has clinched the Democratic nomination. The news even catching Clinton off-guard, forcing her to deliver hastily-written remarks.

CLINTON: But we still have work to do, don't we? And we're going to fight hard for every single vote, especially right here in California.

WELKER: Clinton later capping the moment with a previously-planned star-studded event late Monday night.

CLINTON: We're going to come out of the primary even stronger to take on Donald Trump.

WELKER: Bernie Sanders' campaign, which has poured most of its remaining resources into California, called the decision “a rush to judgment.” Sanders, remaining defiant. Singling out NBC and the AP for calling the race for Clinton.

BERNIE SANDERS: The people of California have the right to determine who is going to be President of the United States, not necessarily having to listen to AP or NBC.

WELKER: The Clinton campaign worried clinching the nomination could dampen turnout today in California, where a Clinton win would make it all but impossible for Sanders to stay in the race. She and her campaigner-in-chief holding a combined 34 events in the past week alone, taking aim at Donald Trump.

BILL CLINTON: “I'll make America great again.” That's a code word. What it really means is, “I'll make America great the way it was 50 years ago.”

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Clinton Hits “Magic Number” of Delegates; Makes History as Party’s Presumptive Nominee]

WELKER: And this morning, signs President Obama is already working to unify the deeply divided party, speaking with Bernie Sanders on the phone this weekend. Aides tell NBC News the President could endorse Clinton as early as this week. But the question, what will Sanders do now? It was eight years ago today Hillary Clinton conceded to Barack Obama.

HILLARY CLINTON [JUNE 7, 2008]: Although we weren't able to shatter that highest, hardest glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it’s got about 18 million cracks in it.

WELKER: In an interview with Rachel Maddow before Clinton clinched, she called on Sanders to do the same.

CLINTON: I knew how important it was that we unify the Democratic Party. I think it’s equally important this time around. Sanders' argument is that the math that put Clinton over the top relies on super-delegates, those are those elected officials who don't officially cast their ballots until the convention. Important to point out this is the same process that has been used in every election in modern history. And Secretary Clinton's lead is sizable any way you look at it. Senator Sanders will mark tonight in California, Secretary Clinton will be right here in Brooklyn. Matt, Savannah?

GUTHRIE: Alright, Kristen Welker starting us off, thank you.


Good Morning America
7:00 AM ET TEASE:

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: Hillary Clinton makes history, Clinching the Democratic nomination for president, winning the support of delegates who will make her the first female nominee of a major party.

HILLARY CLINTON: We are on the brink of a historic, historic, unprecedented moment.

STEPHANOPOULOS: Bernie Sanders fights back, saying it's not over yet, as six more states get ready to vote today.

7:01 AM ET SEGMENT:

GEORGE STEPHANOPOULOS: It is a big day in the race for the White House. Let's take a look at the delegate board. You see it right there, Hillary Clinton has won the delegates she needs to become the Democratic nominee at the Democratic convention, they will put her over the top. The first female nominee ever of a major party.  

ROBIN ROBERTS: And it was exactly eight years ago today that Hillary Clinton withdrew from the race and endorsed Barack Obama. We all remember that moment.  And today, well, as you said, George, a much different story.

STEPHANOPOULOS: A story that is not quite over yet. Still a lot of states yet to vote today. Clinton still in a pretty bruising battle with Bernie Sanders. He says he's going to keep fighting her all the way to the convention. As I said, six states go to the polls today. Let's take a look at Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders supporters. There they are in New Jersey, they're getting ready to vote today. And ABC's Cecilia Vega is in los Angeles, California, voting as well, she’s got the latest. Good morning, Cecilia.

CECILIA VEGA: George, good morning to you. Hillary Clinton wasn't planning on making this history overnight, this came after a fresh count of super-delegates. In fact, her big party is planned for tonight in New York. And adding to all of this drama, Bernie Sanders is refusing to accept these results.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Hillary Clinton Clinches Nomination; Defiant Sanders Vows to Keep Fighting]

Overnight, Hillary Clinton securing enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination. Making history as the first woman in the country to become the presumptive nominee of a major political party.

CLINTON: We are on the brink of a historic, historic unprecedented moment. But we still have work to do, don't we?

VEGA: Clinton winning enough commitments from super-delegates to push her to the number needed for the nomination, and it came early. Six states vote today, Clinton reminding voters that she still needs their support.

CLINTON: We're going to fight hard for every single vote, especially right here in California!

VEGA: Bernie Sanders, his family right there by his side in San Francisco, defiant. Saying he can convince super-delegates – those Democratic Party leaders who have committed to supporting Clinton – to switch their allegiance and vote for him.

SANDERS: We're going to go into that convention with enormous momentum.

VEGA: But that is a nearly impossible task. Sanders would need to flip more than half of Clinton's super-delegates to his side.

CLINTON: Thank you so much. Are you having a good time?

VEGA: Clinton's late night star-studded L.A. fundraiser, from Stevie wonder to Christina Aguilera, now feeling more like a victory party.

CLINTON: It's not an overstatement for me to say that we have a really important election now.

VEGA: But her rival across the aisle overnight saying he's made history too.

DONALD TRUMP: I have great respect for women. I was the one that really broke the glass ceiling on behalf of women more than anybody in the construction industry.

VEGA: Trump sending mixed messages about the Mexican-American judge from Indiana on his Trump University case. The candidate urging top supporters to defend his attacks, while now also saying the judge's heritage doesn't matter.

BILL O’REILLY: Wouldn't it have been better if you just said, “Look, I don’t think I’m being treated fairly” and let the Mexican thing alone.

TRUMP: Well, the question was asked to me. I don't care if the judge is Mexican or not. I’m going to do great with the Mexican people because I provide jobs.

VEGA: And Trump could soon have another big fight on his hands, President Obama telling aides that he is eager to get out on the campaign trail and start campaigning against Trump. We know that his endorsement of Hillary Clinton could come very soon. Robin, we also know that Bernie Sanders is soon to be headed back to Vermont after voting today to assess his campaign.

ROBIN ROBERTS: Alright, Cecilia, thank you.


CBS This Morning
7:00 AM ET TEASE:

CHARLIE ROSE: Hillary Clinton makes history. She is the first woman to become the Democratic presumptive nominee for president. CBS News estimates she has the delegates she needs even before six states vote today.

7:03 AM ET SEGMENT:

CHARLIE ROSE: For the first time in American history, a woman is the presumptive presidential nominee of a major political party. A CBS News estimate confirms Hillary Clinton has the delegate support she needs to secure the nomination at next month's Democratic convention.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Clinton Makes History; 1st Woman to be Major Party’s Presumptive Nominee]

NORAH O’DONNELL: Now, we want to show you how we reached that conclusion. Clinton needs 2,383 delegates to clinch the nomination. She has earned 1,812 pledged delegates from the primary elections and caucuses. CBS News estimates 80%, or 571, super-delegates are now committed to Clinton. Super-delegates are high-ranking Democrats who can choose to support whomever they want. And the new total gives Clinton the magic number of 2,383.  

GAYLE KING: But Bernie Sanders says it's not over yet. He believes he can still get many of those super-delegates to change their mind before the convention. He trails Hillary Clinton by a total of 820 delegates, including 523 super-delegates. Sanders hopes for an upset in today's California primary, where 475 delegates are up for grabs. It is one of six states voting today. Got all that?

ROSE: We have –

KING: We’ve got full political team coverage here in Studio 57 to cover these big developments. We begin with Nancy Cordes, who is covering the Democrat's new presumptive nominee. Nancy, good morning.

NANCY CORDES: Good morning. It was on this day eight years ago that Clinton conceded to then-Senator Barack Obama. Now, she's the presumptive nominee. Though, she probably would not have minded waiting one more day to clinch that title.

[ON-SCREEN HEADLINE: Clinton Clinches; Frontrunner Secures Delegates, Sanders Fights On]

HILLARY CLINTON: We are on the brink of a historic, historic, unprecedented moment. But we still have work to do, don't we?

CORDES: On the stump and online, Clinton urged her supporters in six states not to get complacent today and to “finish the primary strong.” She'll need all of them because recent polls of the nation's largest state show Clinton leading by just two points.

CLINTON: We have a really important election now.

CORDES: Her Democratic opponent wasn't ready to accept the news either.

BERNIE SANDERS: We're going to go into that convention with enormous momentum.

CORDES: Sanders argued Monday he can still convince super-delegates backing Clinton to change their minds between now and July's convention.

SANDERS: In every instance, we beat Trump by far larger margins than does Hillary Clinton.

CLINTON: He’s basically – seems to be suggesting that super-delegates should overturn the will of the people.

CORDES: President Obama called Sanders this week, alerting him that he would soon endorse Clinton, urging him to help unify the party.

SANDERS: I really think it's not appropriate to talk about my discussions with the President.

CORDES: Democratic groups aren't waiting for Sanders to come around. The largest super-PAC backing Clinton has a new ad that will hit the air waves tomorrow in potential battleground states. It highlights Trump's mockery of a disabled reporter.

DONALD TRUMP: Oh, I don't know what I said, oh, I don't remember.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: When I saw Donald Trump mock somebody with a disability, it showed me his soul.

CORDES: Clinton may not need the delegates up for grabs today, but big wins in New Jersey and California would blunt Sanders' argument that he's got a mandate to stay in the race. He heads home to Vermont tomorrow to assess where his campaign goes from here.

O’DONNNELL: They're hoping people still turn out and vote today.

CORDES: Exactly, on both sides.

O’DONNELL: Nancy, thank you.

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