By Tom Blumer | January 23, 2017 | 10:50 PM EST

The New York Times reported Monday afternoon that NBC has suspended Saturday Night Live writer Katie Rich indefinitely for tweeting ... well, what? Reporter Dave Itzkoff failed to tell readers what Rich tweeted just minutes after Donald Trump was inaugurated as the nation's 45th President on Friday. Instead, he vaguely described it as "a widely criticized post she made Friday on her personal Twitter account in which she mocked Barron Trump, the 10-year-old son of President Donald J. Trump." That description required over 100 more characters than Rich's offensive tweet contained. Itzkoff's failure to quote is part of a trend.

By Jack Coleman | January 23, 2017 | 7:32 PM EST

Two largely unheralded accomplishments by President Trump right out of the gate -- first, his mere presence in Washington compelled countless women to get more exercise in one day than Michelle Obama could persuade them to exert over eight years. And second, inducing liberal court jester Bill Maher to question the sanctity of a major federal bureaucracy. Not bad for Trump's first weekend in office.

Maher conspicuously deviated from his practice of including at least a token conservative or Trump supporter among his guests on Friday night's season opener of HBO's Real Time with Bill Maher, opting instead to go unchallenged with a group of like-minded leftists who nodded vigorously in agreement. A safe space indeed for a man who once touted his politically incorrect bona fides.

By Hans Bader | January 23, 2017 | 5:02 PM EST

It would be difficult to think of any principle more basic than that criminal defendants can’t be convicted except by proof beyond a reasonable doubt. But left-leaning “fact-checker” PolitiFact doesn’t even know it. In an error-filled January 19 “fact-check,” PolitiFact’s Anna Orso writes about “the ‘clear and convincing’ standard used in criminal trials.”  The clear and convincing evidence standard is not used in criminal trials. Even my nine-year old daughter knows that the correct standard is “beyond a reasonable doubt.”

By Curtis Houck | January 23, 2017 | 3:17 PM EST

After calling on some reporters not from establishment media, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer finally called on network reporters in his Monday press briefing, including a tense square-off with ABC’s Jonathan Karl over whether he needs to “pledge never to knowingly say something that is not factual.” When Spicer called on Karl, he admitted that he wanted “[b]efore I get to a policy question, just a question about the nature of your job.”

By Matthew Balan | January 23, 2017 | 2:18 PM EST

CNN's David Gergen and Martha Pease gushed over the anti-Donald Trump Women's March in a Sunday op-ed for the news network's website: "It was certainly a magic moment -- hundreds of thousands of women pouring hour after hour into the Mall in Washington." Gergen and Pease contended that "Trump may have done something that...even Barack Obama could not do: spark the creation of a progressive movement that massively resists an America that goes backward." The pair also touted how the protesters "fear that...they will lose control not only of their bodies but of their basic rights and destinies."

By Kyle Drennen | January 23, 2017 | 12:42 PM EST

On Monday, all three network morning shows eagerly promoted the liberal group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) filing a lawsuit against President Trump and accusing him of “violating the Constitution.” At the top of NBC’s Today, co-host Matt Lauer proclaimed: “Defendant-in-chief. The new president being formally sued this morning over his hotel and television interests...”

By Tom Blumer | January 23, 2017 | 11:25 AM EST

On CNN's Anderson Cooper 360 on Saturday, Bakari Sellers described Saturday's "Women's March" as "something we haven't seen in this country or around this world in a very long time." Concerned Women for America CEO Penny Nance then pointed out the obvious, at least as far as the U.S. is concerned, which is that the Annual March for Life in Washington has routinely drawn crowds in the hundreds of thousands, and that January rallies in other cities, especially on the West Coast, have drawn ever-increasing throngs of prolife Americans. Nance clearly got under Sellers' skin when she questioned the validity of calling Saturday's event a "Women's March."

By Brad Wilmouth | January 23, 2017 | 10:43 AM EST

On Saturday's New Day on CNN, during a segment with two organizers from the left-wing Women's March on Washington, D.C., CNN host Alisyn Camerota brought up the issue of pro-life women's groups being unwelcome even though the liberal activist group tries to market itself as if it represents all women.

But her guests misleadingly tried to deny that pro-life groups are not welcome as they claimed that everyone is generally invited to show up and march, ignoring the fact that the group recently kicked a pro-life women's group off the "Partners" list on its website.

By Brad Wilmouth | January 23, 2017 | 7:52 AM EST

Appearing as a guest on a special Saturday edition of The Lead with Jake Tapper on CNN, Women's March attendee Padma Lakshmi, host of the Bravo program Top Chef, complained about Republican plans to defund Planned Parenthood, dubiously claiming that "little of what Planned Parenthood does is abortion," and fretting that President Donald Trump "has given voice to a lot of racism and misogyny and just given a boldness to a certain kind of hatred and violence."


A bit later, after being pressed by host Tapper about pro-life groups being excluded from the march, she conceded that doing so was a mistake for outreach purposes, but then in the next breath hyperbolically asserted that one has to be "insane" or "crazy" to not be a "feminist."
 

By Tom Blumer | January 22, 2017 | 8:45 PM EST

At 6:55 a.m. on Sunday, Angie Goff of NBC4 in Washington, whose Twitter handle is @OhMyGOFF, tweeted, "JUST IN: The White House releases statement ..." on Saturday's "Women's Marches" in Washington and elsewhere. Goff attached the alleged "White House" statement. 2-1/2 hours later, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer tweeted that "The White House has not issued a statement." Good grief.

By Tom Johnson | January 22, 2017 | 8:14 PM EST

“The most important development of the last half-century in American politics,” believes New York magazine’s Chait, is “the Republican Party’s embrace of movement conservative ideology.” In a Thursday post, Chait cited six books, none of which was written by a conservative, that “help elucidate” this phenomenon. Among Chait’s choices: E.J. Dionne’s Why the Right Went Wrong; Richard Hofstadter’s Social Darwinism in American Thought (“scathingly dispatches a powerful right-wing idea that was destined to endure: the notion that the free market is a perfectly just mechanism for rewarding value and punishing failure”); and Paul Krugman’s Peddling Prosperity (“a powerful critique of supply-side economics…which Krugman aptly dispatches as simply crankery lacking any grounding in serious economic theory”).

By Nicholas Fondacaro | January 22, 2017 | 11:22 AM EST

The Sunday following the anti-President Donald Trump Women’s March on Washington, network news rushed to spin the event as an inclusive event about putting the president on notice. “[Trump will] be confronting images, however, like this,” hyped Paula Farris on Good Morning America, “Hundreds of thousands of women, and men, hitting the streets.” There was no talk of the obscene parts of Ashley Judd’s hate filled tirade nor Madonna’s fantasy of “blowing up the White House,” only a fleeting mention on NBC.