In the editorial titled "The Grand Old Party of Disenfranchisement," the Washington Post rides to the defense of convicted felons by conflating the rights of criminals with the rights of blacks in taking aim at Virginia Republicans who are pushing to make it more difficult for felons to regain their right to vote. In its first sentence, the article accuses the Virginia GOP of trying to "suppress" the "African-American vote" in recent years: "Virginia Republicans have labored in recent years, by an array of legislative and judicial means, to suppress the vote -- specifically, the African-American vote -- in an effort to nudge a presidential swing state into the GOP column."



This past week, the MRC’s Rich Noyes charted some of the most outrageous liberal media quotes in 2016. They served as yet another example of how the masks came off of countless journalists this election year, revealing their liberal biases. However, it’s not just the case with the news media but also scripted shows airing in primetime on ABC, CBS, and NBC. 

 



On Sunday night, Justin Baragona at Mediaite caught CNN red-handed nine days before the election in the highly unprofessional act of fabricating claims that Donald Trump told a Colorado rally that they should vote repeatedly on Election Day. 



The truth, as they say, hurts. Nowhere is this better illustrated recently than over there at The Columbia Journalism Review. Where CJR staff writer and senior Delacorte fellow David Uberti has penned this seriously misleading piece about my recent remarks on CNN concerning the “rigged election” controversy brought to the fore by Donald Trump.



Before MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews compared President Barack Obama to Martin Luther King Jr. with a biblical delivery, Matthews expressed on Tuesday some bitterness that “the Supreme Court intervened in our electoral process” back in 2000 to which conservative radio talk show host Hugh Hewitt promptly swatted him down. 



The left continues to insist that voter fraud is a myth, specifically that "voter fraud is very rare, voter impersonation is nearly non-existent," and that "most allegations of fraud turn out to be baseless."

Part of the support system for that insistence comes from the press, where reports of election fraud routinely get ignored or downplayed.



As he’s been known to do from time-to-time, Fox News Channel (FNC) anchor Shepard Smith flashed his liberal tilt on Wednesday afternoon in reading a simple news brief about the Supreme Court putting a stay on North Carolina’s voter I.D. law by lamenting that, in his book, such laws are intended to discourage minorities from voting. The 33-second news brief started off fairly innocent with Smith explaining that “we’ve just gotten an AP news alert out of the State of North Carolina” before reading the headline from the Associated Press.



Every election cycle we must endure challenges and allegations about fraud (conservatives) and discrimination (liberals) when it comes to voter ID laws. This year is no different. A federal court ruled that the Texas Voter ID law passed in 2011, requiring voters to present official photo identification, discriminated again poor, minority and disabled voters and ordered a judge to approve new interim rules for the Nov. 8 election. The new rules will broaden the list of acceptable forms of ID. Voters will now be able to present, among other things, an expired ID, a government check or a current utility bill.



Similar to the saying about the only certain things are death and taxes, one certainty when covering the liberal media is that MSNBC will complain about voter ID laws and little to no early voting being voter suppression efforts and Tuesday night was no different with the culprits being Rachel Maddow and disgraced former NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams. 



Amidst their voluminous Super Tuesday 3 coverage, the CBS Evening News found just over two minutes to trot out the tired liberal argument that voter ID laws, like the one in North Carolina, have a racist angle. Mark Strassamann: “In North Carolina, about 1,000 voters cast provisional ballots because they didn't have enough identification to meet the state's new, strict voter ID law. The law was passed even though voter fraud is almost unknown there. Opponents say the law is meant to silence minority voters.”



A frequent whiner when it comes to Republicans and voter ID laws, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews couldn’t help but briefly commiserate with his guests following the first 2016 GOP presidential debate that the “denial of voting rights” and other issues like “childhood development” that “parents, especially mothers care about” were not discussed in the debate.



On Wednesday, CNN Newsroom host Carol Costello and Democratic strategist Paul Begala attacked both the GOP and Jeb Bush for their positions on voter ID laws. Costello dismissed Republican voter ID concerns by asserting that there “are very few cases of voter fraud in our nation.” She added that, to critics, “it seems that they are trying to suppress the black vote.”