So which is it? Is The New York Times a newspaper — a journalistic outfit? Or is The New York Times a Deep State co-conspirator against a sitting President of the United States? As the world knows, this past week, The Times opinion section published a piece titled: “I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration; I work for the president but like-minded colleagues and I have vowed to thwart parts of his agenda and his worst inclination.”



Giving viewers a preview of their gushy Saturday coverage for the pro-gun control March for Our Lives, NBC Nightly News willfully played the role of stenographer for the radical students and their incendiary leader David Hogg, touting the “massive,” “powerful,” and “remarkable” event akin to the Vietnam War protests even though it hasn’t even happened yet.



Once upon a time I was nineteen. (No comments, please.) I have related part of this story in a speech a few months back at my alma mater, Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. In the wake of what has become a controversial CNN Townhall meeting on the Florida shooting, there is a media aspect of my tale that I neglected to relate --- and the reaction to the Florida CNN Townhall reminds.



Though he wasn’t able to out-do CNN in the gushiness department, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews gave it his best shot on Tuesday by proclaiming the blistering anti-Trump speech by Republican Senator Jeff Flake (Ariz.) as something “straight from a great novel or movie.”



"The highest patriotism is not a blind acceptance of official policy, but a love of one's country deep enough to call her to a higher plain." -- Sen. George McGovern (D-SD) Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary "The Vietnam War" for PBS. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were half a century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.



Before becoming a newspaper columnist I was a broadcast news reporter for local TV stations and occasionally appeared on the NBC radio and television networks. I have some experience at being on the receiving end of hostilities directed at the media. At a pro-Nixon, pro-Vietnam war rally I covered in the early '70s, a demonstrator looked at the NBC logo on my microphone and called me a "communist." We had never met. He knew nothing about my politics or the quality of my reporting. He assumed that because I was covering the event for NBC I must be a left-wing radical.



Ask a conservative to name the American leader who comes to mind when they think of the Vietnam War, he or she will almost surely cite Lyndon Baines Johnson. Ask a liberal and you may also hear LBJ in response -- but more likely you'll hear Richard Milhous Nixon instead. Long before the left began blaming George W. Bush for everything, Nixon filled that role.

Nearly four decades since it ended, the Vietnam War still has the power to polarize, especially when a major network looks back at a specific event from that tumultuous era. (Video after the jump)



Yet another example of why I've long referred to Mike Malloy as the Voice of the Guard in the Gulag.

Bad enough that this most creepy and vampiric of men can barely let consecutive sentences pass without reference to carnage and bloodshed. On his radio show Tuesday, Malloy slandered Sen. John McCain as a war criminal who murdered civilians during the Vietnam War and was justifiably tortured for doing so. (audio clip after page break)