On Monday's New Day on CNN, as fill-in co-host Jim Sciutto and CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin discussed the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to take up a gun case originating in New York, the two fretted that the right-leaning Court might end up barring many gun control proposals that are popular with liberals like more restrictive background checks.



On Sunday's World News Tonight, at the end of a full report on liberal Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's health scare from the weekend, ABC reporter Kyra Phillips misleadingly gave the impression that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had reacted to her health problems by ghoulishly speculating about replacing her when, in reality, she was referring to comments the Republican leader made six months ago.



Hollywood has a weirdly idolatrous fascination with Ruth Bader Ginsburg. They have made both a documentary and fictional film about her and the Oscars last year was downright hagiographic in its worship of the "Notorious RBG." Because she protects the left’s sacrament of abortion and other left-wing causes, she is their living saint.



Another Supreme Court LGBTQ-agenda showdown is in the works. A crucial case dealing with whether the term “sex” in The Civil Rights Act of 1964 can be expanded to include “sexual orientation” is being spearheaded by the George Soros-funded American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).



On Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough says "I know" the Roberts Supreme Court won't overturn Roe v. Wade, in light of a recent poll showing only 13% of Americans favor overturning it. Refusing to apply the Constitution, bowing instead to the public sentiment of the day, would represent an appalling abdication of the Court's duty. 



On Wednesday's New Day on CNN, the show was fixated on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell commenting last night that he would work to fill a hypothetical U.S. Supreme Court vacancy if one occurred in 2020, as hosts John Berman and Alisyn Camerota brought up the issue repeatedly across all three hours of the show. Additionally, no conservative commentators were included in the panel discussions even while several liberal contributors including Joe Lockhart, John Avlon, and Catherine Rampell were allowed to give their negative commentary against McConnell.



On Wednesday's Full Frontal show on TBS, late-night "comedian" Samantha Bee began what is allegedly a comedy show by railing against recent efforts to curtail abortion, including both the passage of heartbeat laws to protect unborn babies, and the recently released film Unplanned recounting a former Planned Parenthood employee who turned pro-life.



On Friday, MSNBC’s Morning Joe was relieved by the Supreme Court’s decision to temporarily block a Louisiana law that would require abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges. Host Joe Scarborough hailed Chief Justice John Roberts for siding with liberals to impose a stay on the policy until a final ruling was handed down, declaring the move maintained the “integrity” of the high court.



On Friday, all three network morning shows eagerly touted the Supreme Court temporarily blocking a Louisiana law set to go into effect that would require abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges. The same hosts and correspondents that breathlessly hyped the “big story” completely ignored an extreme late-term abortion law being passed in New York State just two weeks ago.



Feminist activists have only one goal this year: to make sure abortions in all forms stay legal. As the Supreme Court decides whether or not to hear a case that could end legislation requiring aborted fetuses to be buried as human beings, feminists are panicking.

 



CNN played a clip of Seth Meyers, from his Late Night show on NBC, saying: "Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is recovering in the hospital after she fell in her office and fractured three ribs. Wow: if you had told me a Supreme Court Justice fell over and broke some ribs, I would have bet on the new guy." Late Night then cut to a clip of Kavanaugh saying "I like beer."



The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case that could determine the status of social media companies as state actors. On October 12, the court accepted Manhattan Community Access Corp v. Halleck, a case where two producers sued the Manhattan Neighborhood Network for suspending them for expressing critical views.