Following the horrific mass shootings in El Paso, TX and Dayton, OH, CNBC asked Visa CEO Alfred Kelly about the role of corporations in gun control. Kelly condemned the shootings and called for legislative action on gun control, but defended his company’s processing of gun sales on CNBC’s Squawk Alley August 7. CNBC technology reporter Deirdre Bosa asked him if his views had evolved over the past year. She cited other payment platforms like Apple, whose CEO Tim Cook slammed U.S. lawmakers’ “insanity” on the issue.



The GOP tax cuts scored yet another win on Wednesday when tech giant Apple cited the cuts as a driving factor for their newly announced plans to build a new campus, create 20,000 new jobs, and invest $350 billion in the U.S. economy among other exciting announcements. But despite the great news, NBC Nightly News and Spanish-language networks Univision and Telemundo failed to cover the story at all while CBS Evening News left out their praise for the tax cuts.



Giving $1 million to the conservative-bashing Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) wasn’t enough for Apple. It is matching donations by its employees and using iTunes to encourage users to donate even more to the SPLC, which regularly depicts mainstream conservative organizations as “hate groups.”



Before Apple CEO Tim Cook publicly revealed his sexuality, he received advice from CNN’s Anderson Cooper — who came out publicly in 2012. That’s what Cook told The Washington Post in a wide-ranging interview including his views on homosexuality and environmentalism.



In an interview aired tonight on ABC's World News Tonight, Apple CEO Tim Cook told anchor David Muir that it was FBI incompetence that essentially led to the San Bernardino's county-issued iPhone to be locked up and its data inaccessible. What's more, lamented Cook, he learned about the court order, like the rest of the country, from the media rather than directly from the FBI.



It doesn't seem likely that an oil company CEO would get the benefit of the doubt Apple CEO Tim Cook received from the press yesterday after he emailed well-known financial commentator and investment adviser Jim Cramer about his company's performance in China.

In an email read over the air on CNBC, Cook reported that "we have continued to experience strong growth for our business in China through July and August." The question is whether, by providing this private disclosure, Cook violated U.S. "fair disclosure" regulations requiring that "materal information" be disclosed to the public.



Left-wing Apple is huge and popular with the technorati. It became the world’s first company worth $700 billion, and was once rich enough to buy the entire island of Cyprus. But Apple said it can only afford to pay musicians pennies an hour for streaming their music, approximately 27 times less than Chinese factory workers earned making the Apple Watch.

Apple came under intense criticism after singer Taylor Swift complained about the company’s plan to pay artists nothing in some cases. ABC, CBS and NBC all highlighted Swift’s fight. None of them pointed out Apple’s hypocrisy as a prominent left-wing company that pays musicians peanuts.



Apple Inc. is not merely a tech company; it’s also a destroyer of right-wing doctrine. That was the main argument of a Tuesday blog post by Daily Kos founder and publisher Markos Moulitsas.

Kos asserted that the huge success of the California-based Apple refutes the “conservatives [who] bray incessantly about the Golden State's ‘high taxes and burdensome regulations.’” He also lauded the company for supporting gay rights (“unlike conservative orthodoxy, tolerance and respect for people's private life are good for business”) and “tak[ing] global climate change seriously.”



Friday's CBS Evening News played up the "growing backlash" by social liberals against a new law in Indiana that protest the religious liberties of business owners. Correspondent Adriana Diaz spotlighted how "the protests have grown from Indiana's state house to a torrent on social media." She also played clips or read excerpts from statements of four opponents of the law, while only featuring two from supporters.



Every December, the people at TIME magazine choose the “Person of the Year,” who is described as “the person or persons who most affected the news and our lives, for good or ill, and embodied what was important about the year.”

Two of the candidates for the 2014 honor were: the Ferguson, Missouri, protesters, “who took to the streets ... following the fatal shooting of an unarmed black 18-year-old by a white police officer;” and the Ebola caregivers, who are still fighting the biggest outbreak of the disease in history, which has so far claimed the lives of nearly 7,000 people in West Africa.



As we've documented time and again, Newsweek global business editor Daniel Gross has a history of anti-business and pro-big government bias.

Gross stayed true to form in his latest attack on a successful American business enterprise in his May 29 Newsweek feature, "Is Apple Too Clever By Half?" Gross's answer, unsurprisingly, was yes, and that the company was greedy because it has followed U.S. tax law scrupulously in a manner that lessened its tax bite.



In real life it's near impossible to find anyone who pities the IRS. That's what the New York Times is for. In a Business Day section front-pager for Thursday's paper, the Times's Michael Shear lamented that the CEO of Apple received relatively kind treatment from a Senate panel this week while IRS officials have been grilled.

"One thing became clear this week on Capitol Hill: It is better to be a tax dodger than a tax collector," whined Shear in the opening paragraph of "Torches and Pitchforks for I.R.S. but Cheers for Apple." "Plenty of good will for iPhones but only disdain for the tax collector," lamented a pull quote on the jump page which appeared underneath a picture of Apple's chief Tim Cook. Apparently Shear, and his editors at the Times, are perplexed that congressmen hold a government agency that abused its power to target Americans for their political beliefs in lower regard than a company which employs thousands of Americans and produces products loved the world over, by people of every political stripe, including those lovable hippies of the Occupy Movement.