TBS’s new comedy Miracle Workers sank even lower in its anti-religious bigotry in just its second episode Tuesday night, “13 Days.” The episode features clips of comedian Bill Maher mocking religion and God, as he so often does, which leads God (Steve Buscemi) to pretend it doesn’t hurt His feelings. But He still wants Maher killed. More specifically, He wants to “explode his penis.” You can’t tell at all that this was written by the typically immature, sex-obsessed, faith-bashing leftist Hollywood, can you? /sarcasm. But don't worry, the creator insists the episode carries "more meaning" than just "one big, elaborate dick joke."



If the approximately 5,892,643 other attempts by Hollywood to mock and criticize God, TBS’s new comedy Miracle Workers has just given us one more vehicle that does just that. Though there is no mention of Jesus yet, the Christian/Jewish God of The Bible is definitely the target, according to a Vanity Fair article titled, “How Miracle Workers Turns Heaven into a Corporate Hell.”



TBS’s comedy The Guestbook decided to take a jab at Christianity, specifically the existence of Jesus, in Tuesday’s episode, “Tonight You Become a Man.”



Over the weekend two former CNN big-wigs, founder Ted Turner and former long-time analyst Jeff Greenfield expressed disappointment in the direction the network has been heading. Turner thought they were spending too much time on politics, while Greenfield accurately noted that many of the people working there counted themselves as part of the anti-Trump “resistance”.



CNN founder Ted Turner doesn’t think much of conservatives, but he’s got a blind spot to the atrocities in North Korea. On September 19, 2005, Turner appeared on CNN’s Situation Room and talked about his visit to the despotic country. He seemed to excuse the regime, saying, “I saw a lot of people over there. They were thin and they were riding bicycles instead of cars, but... I didn’t see any brutality.” 



TBS's Wrecked continued the longstanding tradition, lampooning rich, white men on Tuesday’s episode, “Six Feet,” as “monsters,” misogynists and sexual harassers who look down disdainfully on the poor and treat them horribly. Oh, and they make people hunt and kill each other for sport, too. Because, of course.



Sometimes it’s an understatement to say journalists live in a bubble. On the one hand, they thrill over Barack Obama as “God.” Yet, on March 23, 2009, MSNBC anchor David Shuster called it a “fantasy” to say that the press was pro-Obama. Other examples from This Week in Media Bias History: That time Ted Turner created a slobbering propaganda film on the Soviet Union, a country that “belongs to the people.”



Of all the television shows for the husband of Sarah Palin to make an appearance on, Todd Palin strangely chose TBS’s extremely liberal comedy The Detour. Produced by leftist commentator Samantha Bee and husband Jason Jones, the show was originally based on the real-life family road trips of Bee, Jones and their children, but has now devolved into vile material that Palin should have thought twice about associating himself with.



Just when you thought Hollywood couldn’t sink any lower in their depravity and twisted attempts at humor, especially when it comes to child actors, along comes Tuesday’s episode of TBS’s The Detour, “The Stop.” Which were my thoughts exactly as I watched. “Please, for the literal love of God, make it stop.”



When a show begins with a main character looking at Jesus on a crucifix in a Catholic Church while snidely saying to Him, “Thanks for nothing,” you know right away that there is a clear anti-Catholic bias and that things will go downhill from there. In the same program, a cop remarks, “We found Lucas Garza's body at a Catholic church. You know who hangs out at Catholic churches? Priests.”



The September 4 episode of TBS’s People of Earth “Bee Kind,” revisited their sacrilegious storyline of a Catholic priest having an affair with a married woman, and this time, they took the story to even more offensive heights.



TBS’s People of Earth, a comedy that centers around a support group of people who have been abducted by aliens, hilariously took a shot at feminist, interpretative dance art on the Monday, August 28 episode, “Aftermath.”