Five years ago, the Tea Party launched itself onto the American political scene – pushing hard against ObamaCare, the $787-billion stimulus and Big Government. On Feb. 27, 2009, Tea Party protests were held in more than 40 cities.

But rather than treat the Tea Party as a standard protest movement, the American media closed ranks with the left and spent much of the last five years attacking them. The Tea Party has been called “racist,” “homophobic,” “terrorists” and “wingnuts.” It has also been accused of causing “economic destruction.” The media tried to link Tea Partiers to the attack on then-Rep. Gabrielle “Gabby” Giffords, D-Ariz., and the Aurora theater shooting.



CNBC’s Rick Santelli is a man who isn’t afraid to speak his mind. His Feb. 19, 2009, rant was credited with inspiring the start of the Tea Party. It’s not alone. Santelli raises his voice on the floor of the Chicago Board of Trade whenever he feels that an important point of information isn’t getting enough attention.

Complete with arm waving, props and a lot more facts than liberals are comfortable with, here are what we at the Business and Media Institute have decided are the five best Rick Santelli rants of all time.

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On Thursday's The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell on MSNBC, substitute host Ari Melber tried to hype former Nevada Lieutenant Governor Sue Wagner, who left office almost 20 years ago, as a "conservative" who recently left the Republican Party because of the Tea Party.

But, as she appeared as a guest, Wagner quickly identified herself as having been "somewhat liberal my entire life," and put the icing on the cake at the end of the interview as she sdmitted to which news network she "always" watches.



Liberals are so often a bundle of puzzling contradictions, aren't they? On any given day, they'll inveigh fervently against the horrors of violence, misogyny, drug addiction. All of minutes later, they'll gush their ardor for a reputed form of music that glorifies the pathologies they claim to hate. Go figure.

An example of this could be heard on Stephanie Miller's radio show today when she pined for the days that we'll see future American leaders "blacker" than President Obama and -- better yet -- they'll be gangsta rappers. Hey, we can only hope. Couldn't be any worse than the homies in charge now, right? (Audio after the jump)



Perhaps it was only a matter of time before Bloomberg Businessweek followed its namesake, New York Mayor and Head Nurse Michael Bloomberg, moving from business and finance and into liberal politics.

And it’s jumped in with both feet. This week’s cover, featuring Ted Cruz dressed as the mad hatter, proclaimed “The Tea Party Won: Ted Cruz and his band of dead enders took the U.S. through the looking glass. Crazy is the new normal.” Covering everything from the deficit to the debt to tax cuts, this edition was little more than a PR piece for the White House.



CNN's Carol Costello went full bore after the Tea Party on Monday morning, mocking the movement as "often ridiculed" and quoting The Daily Beast's John Avlon calling Tea Party members of Congress "extremists."

"The Tea Party rises again orchestrating, thanks to large part to Senator Ted Cruz, a spending bill tied to defunding ObamaCare that may well lead to a government shutdown. This from a movement that according to Gallup only 22 percent of Americans support, and is often ridiculed," she snidely remarked.

 



The Big Three (ABC, CBS, NBC) networks have colluded with the Obama administration to censor the latest IRS scandal news. The latest: On September 17 the Washington Times reported the following: “IRS employees were ‘acutely’ aware in 2010 that President Obama wanted to crack down on conservative organizations and were egged into targeting tea party groups by press reports mocking the emerging movement, according to an interim report being circulated Tuesday by House investigators.”

The report, by staffers for Rep. Darrell E. Issa, California Republican and chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, quoted two Internal Revenue Service officials saying the tea party applications were singled out in the targeting program that has the agency under investigation because ‘they were likely to attract media attention.’”



During Friday afternoon's edition of his radio talk show, host Rush Limbaugh rejected the charge made by President Barack Obama that most Republican members of Congress have told him that privately they agree with his desire to fund ObamaCare but fear a backlash from the Tea Party and “what Limbaugh would say about me on the radio.”

The conservative host called the president's claim “silly because he's getting everything he wants” and then stated that “the true irony of this is the Republicans are not listening to me,” but Obama "has to blame somebody” for his lack of accomplishments during his second term.



MSNBC contributor Joy Reid – in her infinite liberal wisdom – has the Republican Party all figured out. In a sneering tirade against conservatives on Wednesday’s PoliticsNation, Reid broke the entire party into five separate groups: the “angry” Tea Party, the evangelicals that “want to litigate social issues only,” the “economic conservatives” who want to “get rid of Social Security and Medicare,” those who focus “on ripping away programs for the poor,” and the “Wall Street guys who really run the party.”

Reid, of course, didn’t just reserve her criticism for views she disagrees with. She also claimed the only thing these ‘groups’ agreed on was “despising Barack Obama.” Doubtless we can trust Reid, managing editor of NBC’s left-leaning website TheGrio.com, as a trusted source on all things conservative.



The Tea Party grassroots protesters have made no secret of their support for limited government and lower taxes. But from the perspective of network reporters and anchors, the Tea Party’s message was more radical: “no government” and “no taxes.”

On May 10, the IRS admitted to flagging more than 100 Tea Party-related applications for higher scrutiny, including applications that included the words “Tea Party” and “patriot.” But even before that targeting began, the networks had portrayed the Tea Party as a extreme group opposed to taxation, instead of one supporting smaller government.



While the IRS targeting of conservative groups was still heating up in 2012, a Soros-funded journalism nonprofit was helping fan the flames. The Pulitzer-Prize-winning ProPublica released two stories targeting conservative nonprofits including Crossroads GPS, Americans for Prosperity and the Republican Jewish Coalition.

ProPublica was founded by prominent Democratic contributor and has direct connections to some of the nation’s top news organizations from The New York Times to ABC News. ProPublica was also the organization that received leaked IRS tax forms of conservative groups. ProPublica admitted “they should not have been sent to us before they were approved.”



When Politico isn’t busy sending editors to an off-the-record chat with a potentially perjurious U.S. Attorney General, it spends its time mocking a retiring conservative legislator.

A panel of reporters from the Washington tabloid ganged up on Michele Bachmann on Thursday’s Morning Joe, blasting the Minnesota congresswoman as a “celebrity politician” who will become “irrelevant to politics the moment she steps out of public office.”