In another Hollywood middle finger towards border protection agency ICE, several celebrities have rallied around a detained illegal immigrant, demanding that lawmakers, including Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio, rethink their calls for his deportation.



Ah, the Sundance Film Festival, where the magic of independent film takes center stage and audiences thrill to the prospect of discovering show biz’s next new big thing. According to The Daily Beast, that next big thing may be the “most unlikely star of the 2019 Sundance Film Festival,” Lucien Greaves, the leader of The Satanic Temple. Greaves and his group are the subject of the documentary Hail Satan?



Featuring climate change films is no longer enough for Sundance. This year, there’s a whole category dedicated to environmental propaganda. Even eco-porn. “For the first time in the history of the festival, Sundance is spotlighting more than a dozen films under one theme with its new Climate Program,” including a hardcore porno with all the sex scenes removed, The Hollywood Reporter wrote on Jan. 18. 



Chelsea host Chelsea Handler is making good on her tearful, post-election promise to use to her “voice.” On January 21, she’ll be leading the Sundance Film Festival’s “Women’s March on Main” to protest President-elect Trump’s inauguration.  



Sundance, the left-leaning indie film festival held in Utah each January, helped turn former vice president Al Gore into the media’s favorite film star. Now, the festival is set to do it again. A sequel to Gore’s film, An Inconvenient Truth, will premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, according to The Hollywood Reporter (THR). The original premiered at Sundance in 2006 before its wide release and media fanfare later that year.



At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, some attendees are planning to express their worldviews through methods beyond cinematic art. If you can’t guess what’s in store, maybe this will help: the festival begins the day before President Trump’s inauguration. And lots of progressives attend. (Read: protests.) 



Like Cannes and even, increasingly, the Academy Awards, The Sundance Film Festival isn’t so much a showcase of new movies as an annual mile marker denoting how far elite tastes and preoccupations have wandered from those of the movie-going public.



Several actors attending the Sundance Film Festival through Jan. 27 in Park City, Utah, have stated that Hollywood has played a part in the recent spate of gun violence through the production of violent films and video games. However, one actor has suggested an unusual solution to the problem.

Alexander Skarsgard, who fired all sorts of weapons at alien invaders in the "Battleship” movie and is a big player in the violent vampire series “True Blood,” said that it may be time to revisit the Second Amendment because the discussion about it “is ridiculous to me.”