As a panel on Sunday's CNN Newsroom with Poppy Harlow discussed the announcement that Donald Trump campaign chief Steve Bannon would be appointed as a high-ranking strategist in the White House, conservative CNN political commentator and former GOP Congressman Jack Kingston was outnumbered by liberals four to one as the group repeatedly pushed charges of "racism" against Bannon. Accusations of "anti-Semitism" and of being a "white supremacist" were recycled, and CNN's Brian Stelter asserted that some find him "frightening" enough to view his presence in the White House as a "national emergency." And at one point, Kingston was even scolded by host Poppy Harlow when he suggested that "journalists" are often equivalent to "Democrats" recalling findings that more than 90 percent of campaign donations given by journalists go to Democrats. Harlow: "That's really -- you know what, Congressman. I take issue with that. That's really unfair."



On Monday, ABC's GMA and NBC's Today pressed Reince Priebus over his future role as chief of staff to Donald Trump. NBC's Matt Lauer hyped that "to some, you're an odd choice for chief of staff, because they've...heard Donald Trump say....we're going counter to the establishment. You are the establishment. You're the ultimate insider."



Liberal MSNBC host Joy Reid has been in meltdown mode since the news of Donald Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton, as evidenced by some of her over the top tweets from the past couple of days as she has tried to link Trump and even his supporters to neo-Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan. On Thursday, reacting to news that the Trump campaign's Steve Bannon would work in the White House, Reid snarked that the move amounted to "bringing neonazism in from the cold and giving it West Wing power." 



Washington Post media columnist Margaret Sullivan unloaded a Two Minutes Hate column on Trump campaign CEO Steve Bannon, which is hardly surprising. But it might be surprising that a columnist who would present herself as a feminist would automatically assume that any woman accusing Bill Clinton of sexual harassment or even rape is "truth-averse." Encouraging them to attend a debate was "surreal." What is she were one of these women, and other women called it "surreal" that she would dare to attend?



Penn State professor and Bernie Sanders enthusiast Sophia McClennen has a message for her fellow progressives: “If the thought of a [Donald] Trump presidency worries you, the thought of a Trump news network should scare the hell out of you.” McClennen’s Monday piece for Salon addressed reports that if Trump loses to Hillary Clinton, he, Steve Bannon, and Roger Ailes may start a competitor to Fox News. McClennen expects that a Trumpcentric media business would be “founded on the same principles we have seen in place during his campaign: hate mongering, extreme nationalism, xenophobia, misogyny and a total lack of connection to reality. If the campaign seemed to have fascist tendencies, imagine a news network founded on those same principles.”



Generally, it’s not a good idea to take advice from people who don’t have your interests at heart. On Friday, NBC’s Chuck Todd advised Donald Trump to stay away from the “rabbit hole” of Clinton “obsession.” MSNBC host Andrea Mitchell fretted that the hiring of David Bossie is a “nightmare in Clinton world.” 



On Monday's New Day, CNN's Alisyn Camerota hounded Mike Pence over supposedly signaling he was "wrong" about supporting free trade his "entire professional and public life" due to his running with Donald Trump. Camerota wondered, "You supported TPP. You supported CAFTA. Donald Trump has said about those things that the U.S. is being taken to the cleaners by these trade deals. Which one of you is right?" Camerota also hyped how "Steve Bannon...he's known as a street fighter. He's known as a flame-thrower. He was the head of the far-right website, Breitbart."



Substituting for allegedly right-leaning columnist David Brooks on Friday's PBS NewsHour, Washington Post columnist Jennifer Rubin repeated a smear from the left against Breitbart News linking the conservative group and its former executive chairman, Steve Bannon, to "very anti-Semitic and anti-minority" sentiments as she responded negatively to Donald Trump's choice of Bannon as his new campaign CEO.



Appearing as a guest on Thursday's CNN Newsroom with Carol Costello, CNN political analyst David Gergen worried that the Republican party has "turned right," and that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump is "doubling down" by choosing Steve Bannon of Breitbart News as CEO of his campaign. As if Bannon were similar to a Nazi, Gergen fretted: "Mr. Breitbart has called Mr. Bannon -- who's the new guru of the Trump campaign -- he's called him the Leni Riefenstahl of the American Tea Party."



While President Obama's record-breaking pace to raising a total of $1 billion earlier this month received significant media attention, there was little if any curiosity among the traditional press about how he was on track to achieve such an unprecedented milestone in presidential fundraising. The broadcast networks in particular have not bothered to mention the growing scandal that is being scrupulously pieced together by alternative media outlets.

An independently-owned website Obama.com (redirects to official site here) has been suspected of accepting millions of dollars worth of illegal foreign donations for months now. Despite all the speculation and accusations coming from a nonprofit organization known as the Government Accountability Institute (GAI), no action had been taken until recently.



The upcoming documentary "Occupy Unmasked" is getting the kind of promotional push too rarely received by right-of-center films.

The movie, directed by Steve Bannon and featuring the late Andrew Breitbart, tells the story of the chaotic, destructive Occupy Wall Street movement. The message hardly fits the standard theatrical template, which routinely sides with or sympathizes with the bedraggled protesters seeking their "fair" share of the one percent's cash.



More than any other Republican presidential prospect, Sarah Palin draws white-hot journalistic loathing. She’s too red-state, too gun-toting, too religious, and too unwilling to abort a disabled “fetus.” Even so, filmmaker Steve Bannon remains deeply optimistic his forthcoming Palin documentary “The Undefeated” will sway the media to see Palin in a different light.

Bannon, a former Goldman Sachs banker turned filmmaker, told National Review’s Kathryn Lopez that once he and his producing partner delved into Palin’s life story, “we decided that not just the American people but even the mainstream media were both fair and decent -- that when presented with something that represented a completely different point of view they would be at least open to considering it.”