Over the weekend, calls mounted for Virginia Governor Ralph Northam to resign over racist photos that were found in his medical school yearbook. Yet the Democrat’s controversial comments supporting a radical abortion law proposed by his party was swept under the rug by the media. CNN even went out of its way to silence any conservative guests who tried to bring up that story on their network this weekend.



On Friday's Erin Burnett Outfront on CNN, during a discussion of revelations that Virginia Democratic Governor Ralph Northam included a racist photograph in his portion of his medical school's yearbook, frequent Republican guest Stephen Moore was lambasted and cut off by other panel members when he brought up the other controversy involving Northam from this week -- that he defended an extreme abortion legalization bill by speaking approvingly of allowing some babies to die immediately after birth if the mother chose to do so.



Immediately following President Trump’s speech before business leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland this morning, CNN had the usual knee-jerk reaction to find something to complain about. Despite the abundance of stories of how Trump’s tax plan has benefitted countless companies who are passing on their saved money to their employees, CNN refused to give Trump credit for the positive economy news.



The “IRS scandal” is best understood as a significant work of fiction, suggested New York magazine’s Jonathan Chait on Tuesday. As Chait tells it, conservatives’ false belief that the tax agency subjected righty groups to especially exacting treatment “prefigure[d] the Republicans’ own blueprint for the use of government as an implement of partisan domination and revenge.”



Paul Krugman's Monday New York Times column hit all of the sweet spots that make liberals smile, defending both President Obama and Hillary Clinton while bashing President Bush and the current crop of Republican presidential candidates. And what of the Democrats? Well, Hillary's "email thing doesn’t rise to the level of a 'scandal.'" Meanwhile, "the modern GOP is basically anti-rational analysis; it’s at war not just with the welfare state but with the Enlightenment."



Several conservative economic thinkers including CNBC's Larry Kudlow and media magnate Steve Forbes recently formed the Committee to Unleash American Prosperity in an effort to persuade aspiring presidents to focus on “the paramount challenge facing our country: slow growth and stagnant incomes.”

Three economists in the group explained their goals in a March 3, Investor's Business Daily op-ed.



"None of them knew the color of the sky" is the first line of the Stephen Crane short story "The Open Boat" about four men crowded in an overloaded dinghy on rough seas. The men are so intent on preventing their small boat from getting swamped, none of them has time to look up.

Much the same way, Ed Schultz is so busy shilling for Obama, he can't see the writing on the wall. (Audio after the jump)



CNN's Carol Costello might as well have read from a Think Progress cheat sheet when she battled conservative economist Stephen Moore over wages and economics on Wednesday. Moore, for his part, gave her a lesson in economics.

Starting with the recent CBO estimate that President Obama's minimum wage proposal would cost a half million jobs, Costello argued that it was just an estimate and that the net job loss could be zero. "So many people would say I'm willing to take that bet," she offered. That was only the first in a string of Costello's liberal economic claims.



At the conclusion of his report on the federal government's July Monthly Treasury Statement, the Associated Press's Martin Crutsinger wrote that federal spending through the first ten months of the current fiscal year is "down 2.9 percent from a year ago," and that the decline "reflects, in part, automatic government spending cuts that began taking effect March 1."

Those "automatic cuts" represent only a very small part of the decline, as will be seen after the jump.



CNN's Carol Costello lectured Republicans on Monday that they should "act like big boys and girls" and present a counter to President Obama's deficit plan. 

Interviewing Stephen Moore of the Wall Street Journal, Costello remarked that Republicans are angry over the President's plan intentionally lacking specific cuts to entitlements. "So, why don't Republicans act like big boys and girls and present their own plan about how they specifically want to cut entitlements? Why don't they just – isn't that how you negotiate?" she huffed.



This election has seen its fair share of tax rhetoric. From Sen. Harry Reid (D-Nev.) accusing Mitt Romney of not paying any taxes for over a decade to MSNBC contributor Joan Walsh insinuating that Ann Romneythrew a “tantrum” over her husband's tax returns, the Romneys have been the target of the political left seeking to use class warfare as a political cudgel. Endless ads and news segments by some in the media obsess over Mitt’s rate of taxation, complaining that he doesn't pay what's fair.



On Friday's Real Time with Bill Maher show on HBO, during a discussion of the recently passed Virginia law that requires an ultrasound be performed on every candidate for abortion in the hopes that the mother might decide not to go through with the procedure, economist Stephen Moore was booed by a number of audience members when he expressed the view that generally it would be a "good thing" to convince women not to have abortions, noting the feelings of regret women often feel afterwards. (Video below)

Inspiring boos, Moore innocuously declared: