It unfortunately didn’t take long for Fox’s X-Men series The Gifted to come back with another liberal pet issue. Last week's new year premiere gave us a Fox News-esque bad guy after the fall season's premiere provided a scene it thinks resembles an ICE raid. Now we’ve opened the “cop shooting an unarmed citizen” narrative with a bonus slam at “stand your ground” laws.



Comedy Central’s Broad City really wants you to know how much they hate Trump. Like, really, really. You would think the episode in which they bleeped out Trump’s name like a curse word and blamed him for a lack of orgasms would have been enough to get their hatred out of their system. But on the Wednesday, November 8 episode, “Florida,” they continued to censor Trump’s name, took a shot at Vice President Mike Pence, and then added Florida to their list of Trump-related enemies.



The September 19 episode of American Horror Story: Cult took on such weighty issues as gun rights, racism, and cisnormative guinea pigs. The episode "Neighbors From Hell" picks up right where the last episode left off, with Ally (Sarah Paulson) having just accidentally shot and killed her wife's employee Pedro when he dropped by the house unexpectedly. In the aftermath, these weighty issues are debated in the town and in the household.



Welcome to the Obama administration's cringe-inducing non sequitur of the week. On Tuesday, Attorney General Eric Holder continued stoking the fires of racial resentment over a Florida jury's acquittal of George Zimmerman. In an address to NAACP leaders, who are demanding federal intervention, Holder attacked Stand Your Ground self-defense laws.

All together now: Squirrel!



On the Monday night edition of All In, Chris Hayes featured a segment decrying what he considered a racially-motivated overzealous prosecution of Marissa Alexander, an African-American Florida woman who was sentenced to 20 years in prison after firing a warning shot in the vicinity of her estranged husband, with whom she was having a dispute. [Link to the audio here]

Hayes hosted a panel which included Rep. Corrine Brown (D-Fla.) to discuss the story, and its implications when compared against the outcome of the Zimmerman case. Rep. Brown passionately exclaimed that this case showed “institutional racism” in the justice system. Hayes and the panel agreed with Brown about her opinion that Alexander had been overcharged for her crime and called into question the legitimacy of “mandatory minimum” laws, which require a preset minimum sentence if convicted of certain crimes. But according to an Associated Press report, the story is a lot more complex than that.