On August 17, CNN published a story with the headline: “Here Are All The Active Hate Groups Where You Live.” Was it a concise list of Nazi groups? No. It was the SPLC “hate map” and the “917 hate groups” that the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) designated as dangerous. The post was just SPLC’s regurgitated map and list, given without comment, context or qualification.



On Wednesday, Antifa was given prominent and positive coverage on MSNBC and not only did it go beyond the pro-Antifa MTP Daily segment but extended to Hardball. Host Chris Matthews featured a guest that gushed over the violent leftists as “diverse” and mostly “peaceful” while another was pathetic unprepared. 



In the aftermath of Charlottesville, when the term “hate group” is used, images of the KKK and neo-nazis immediately come to mind.

However, according to CNN, the real hate groups to watch out for are the conservative organizations, specifically Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), the Family Research Council (FRC), American Family Association and ACT for America.

 



Journalistic integrity took another Monday afternoon on MSNBC, with another casualty in the liberal plot to paint President Trump as a closet neo-Nazi Klansman. Piling in on the liberal media frenzy following Saturday’s sad events at Charlottesville, MSNBC’s Chris Jansing anchored a segment with Trump critic Mark Potok, formerly of the Southern Poverty Law Center.



When a senator has to weigh in on an issue, it must be serious.

On July 31, Senator James Lankford (R-OK) penned a letter to James Goldston, the president of ABC News, rebuking the network for calling the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) an “anti-LGBTQ hate group.” On July 12, ABC reporters used the phrase again and again when referring to the religious freedom group, citing the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) as their source for the smear.



The New York Times is rather desperately still trying to make the idea of a recent, election-related surge in hate crimes stick, even after so many infamous “hate crimes” have been exposed as hoaxes in the Trump era. The latest, from reporter Audra D.S. Burch, made the front of the National section of Monday’s Times, covering three-fourths of the page: “Lawmakers Seek Harsher Hate Crime Penalties.”



After longtime conservative author, columnist, and think tank scholar Charles Murray was chased on Thursday from far-left Middlebury College by an angry mob, the Associated Press felt more than comfortable smearing Murray as a supposed “white nationalist.”

 



Appearing as a guest on Tuesday’s Hardball, MSNBC political analyst and USA Today senior political reporter Heidi Przybyla brazenly argued that anti-Semitism is becoming “mainstream” on the right after having been only a “fringe, alt-right, white nationalist movement.”



After President Donald Trump spent a long weekend at Mar-a-lago, Sean Spicer held his first White House press briefing of the week on Tuesday. There, he faced a slew of questioning about a string of nationwide anti-Semitic crimes, including the touting of the far-left Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). 



Every year, the media promotes an annual study put out by the The Southern Poverty Law Center, a left wing organization devoted to “monitoring” hate groups and crimes across the U.S, despite provoking it’s own hate crime against a conservative organization in 2012. The group has a cozy relationship with the media, with its president Richard Cohen frequently appearing on news programs to promote his group’s “studies,” even though the group in no way actually vets or verifies any of the alleged incidents.



“When they go low...” well, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman goes even lower. On Friday the once-respected economist, who ia no stranger to classless rants, filed a blog post with the offensive title “The Sorrow and the Pity,” a ham-handed swipe of the incoming Trump administration as akin to the Nazi occupation of France. (The Sorrow and the Pity is a 1969 documentary about how the Vichy government of France infamously collaborated with Germany during the World War II occupation.)



The media have been promoting neo-Nazis and white nationalists in hopes to (admirably) discredit them and falsely insinuate that they were far-right conservatives who propelled Donald Trump to the White House. This trend manifested itself with five minutes and 17 seconds Tuesday morning on CBS and NBC that attempted to label the neo-Nazi conference as one featuring “conservative extremist[s]” and added up to three times more coverage than they’ve had on the March for the Life in the past four years.