Media outlets are partnering with the anti-conservative SPLC to discredit ICE. New Jersey's Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) spokesman Emilio Karim Dabul is connected to “multiple hate groups,” The Hill’s Emily Birnbaum reported Monday.



The impossibly fickle, selective and whimsical rules of cultural appropriation are hard to keep straight. (Oops! I said "straight." Apologies to whomever. Oops, can I say "whomever?" Zimever? Verselves? Gah.) According to the white people who run the left-wing Southern Poverty Law Center, eating tacos, drinking tequila and wearing sombreros on Cinco de Mayo "are textbook examples of cultural appropriation." 



Several press outlets have noted that in its latest annual "Hate Tracker," the Thought Police at the Southern Poverty Law Center have added "Male Supremacy" as a "hate group" category. What they aren't reporting is that the SPLC has also begun laying the foundation for marginalizing anyone providing intellectual support for mainstream men's rights activists.



Newsweek, whose home page of late devotes every square pixel to anti-Trump-pro-liberal articles, featured a Harriet Sinclair piece Thursday on President Trump’s then-upcoming speech to the Family Research Council’s Values Voter Summit. Or, as the magazine’s hit-piece of a headline called it, “Donald Trump To Speak At Hate Group's Annual Event, A First For A President.” Seriously? (Newsweek ran a similar "hate group" headline after Trump's speech.) Newsweek relied on the Southern Poverty Law Center for its “hate group” designation. Amazing in its absence is any mention of Floyd Lee Corkins, who in August 2012, using SPLC’s “hate map” as a guide, burst into the headquarters of the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C. with the intention of assassinating the employees of the social conservative Christian organization.



An organization smearing conservative and faith-based organizations as “hate groups” is acting like the “left’s pit bull,” according to one leader in the conservative movement.



Conservative leaders are calling out the liberal media for a dangerous hypocrisy: While media outlets readily promote an organization locating conservative and faith-based organizations on a “hate map,” they would never do the same for a map of abortion providers.



Giving $1 million to the conservative-bashing Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) wasn’t enough for Apple. It is matching donations by its employees and using iTunes to encourage users to donate even more to the SPLC, which regularly depicts mainstream conservative organizations as “hate groups.”



On August 17, CNN published a story with the headline: “Here Are All The Active Hate Groups Where You Live.” Was it a concise list of Nazi groups? No. It was the SPLC “hate map” and the “917 hate groups” that the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) designated as dangerous. The post was just SPLC’s regurgitated map and list, given without comment, context or qualification.



On Wednesday, Antifa was given prominent and positive coverage on MSNBC and not only did it go beyond the pro-Antifa MTP Daily segment but extended to Hardball. Host Chris Matthews featured a guest that gushed over the violent leftists as “diverse” and mostly “peaceful” while another was pathetic unprepared. 



Journalistic integrity took another Monday afternoon on MSNBC, with another casualty in the liberal plot to paint President Trump as a closet neo-Nazi Klansman. Piling in on the liberal media frenzy following Saturday’s sad events at Charlottesville, MSNBC’s Chris Jansing anchored a segment with Trump critic Mark Potok, formerly of the Southern Poverty Law Center.



Apparently if you defend the 1st Amendment, you are guilty of hate speech. That’s the argument put forth by several news outlets -- ABC, NBC, CNN -- and even Teen Vogue. On Tuesday night, June 11, Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave a speech to the members of the Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF), a religious freedom group. The ADF is assisting the Supreme Court case involving Jack Phillips, a Colorado baker who refused to bake a gay wedding cake.



After longtime conservative author, columnist, and think tank scholar Charles Murray was chased on Thursday from far-left Middlebury College by an angry mob, the Associated Press felt more than comfortable smearing Murray as a supposed “white nationalist.”