During an interview with Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker after the first GOP presidential debate, CBS This Morning’s Norah O’Donnell repeatedly badgered the Republican over Donald Trump’s performance during Thursday night’s debate. 



MSNBC host Chris Matthews kicked off his roundtable segment on Tuesday's Hardball by denouncing Ted Cruz's amusing "machine gun bacon" video for conservative media outlet IJReview.com. Unfortunately for Matthews, no one else on his panel was as stuck in the mud, agreeing among themselves it was a clever viral video to put out in the midst of a crowded primary campaign.



As Jon Stewart wraps up his final week as host of the Daily Show, he used his Monday night show to attack a recent Koch brothers event that featured numerous Republican presidential candidates in attendance. Stewart opened up his broadcast by making a crude sexual joke at the expense of the GOPers in attendance who “worked the talking points and cradled the special interests in the hopes of one of them after a period of 45 minutes to an hour would induce the money shot. And really, they didn't care which Koch went off.”



One of the more outrageous chapters during presidential campaign season so far, the press harassment of 2016 GOP candidate and Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker in February over his statement that he "doesn't know" whether President Barack Obama is a Christian, is back.

Nobody in the press seems interested in asking Obama himself how he can still profess to be a Christian and support homosexual marriage, especially when he referenced his Christian beliefs as a basis for his stated opposition to it in 2008. Nor are they curious in learning how Obama can square his self-professed Christianity with his support for abortion at every in utero stage — and arguably beyond that. And of course, nobody is asking Hillary Clinton to declare whether she believes any of her potential November 2016 opponents is a genuine Christian. Yet here was Philip Elliott, who recently left the Associated Press for Time.com, getting a case of the vapors on Saturday when Walker, asked again, basically said, "I don't know, but I presume he is":



On Wednesday, MSNBC host Tamron Hall jumped on a non-story about Governor Scott Walker’s recent visit to Philadelphia in which the GOP presidential hopeful allegedly “got a tough lesson” for, wait for it, ordering a Philly cheesesteak with American cheese rather than cheese Whiz. She lectured Walker that “[if]f you're going to order Philly cheesesteak in Philly, you gotta do it the right way. First, Walker was escorted to the front of the long line at Geno's, a very popular, iconic shop. Then he ordered a sandwich in the way that was just wrong.”



The Washington Post's Dana Milbank is obsessed with tearing Wisconsin Governor and 2016 GOP presidential candidate Scott Walker down, and is clearly not above distorting the facts to make his pathetic points.

Milbank's latest tirade is about how Walker is allegedly "so dangerous" because he doesn't like unions. That's based on quite a bit of direct experience, which has included death threats against him and his family, frequent harassment of his parents, and attempts by labor to intimidate businesses which wouldn't publicly express support for their cause.



The press's favorite abortion questions usually have nothing to do with the 700,000-plus terminations of preborn babies' lives which take place each year in the U.S. (Note: The real figure is likely quite higher, because reporting is voluntary.) Especially when the person interviewed is a Republican or conservative, abortion questions focus heavily on the fewer than 1% of all abortions which are performed because of rape and incest. This is the equivalent of a news organization focusing all of its attention on a single house fire while an entire city a few miles away burns out of control.

2016 GOP presidential candidate Carly Fiorina had no interest in playing this game with Jake Tapper on Tuesday. In the process, she put on a clinic which should be mandatory viewing for any Republican or conservative who is in or wants to have a career in politics.



MSNBC’s online coverage of Scott Walker’s new 20-week abortion ban is about as biased as they come. The story was featured with a screen-filling headline which boldly stated “WALKER BANS CHOICE.” This blatant attempt to slam Walker was eventually changed to “NO CHOICE,” omitting the Republican hopeful’s name.



During an appearance on Friday’s PBS NewsHour, liberal columnist Mark Shields questioned Scott Walker’s readiness to be president as he argued “there’s a lingering sort of “I can see Alaska from my front porch” of Governor Palin with him.” Shields played up liberal criticism of the Wisconsin governor and asked “Is he really ready for prime time?…So, I think Scott Walker has a great story to tell, but there is a question, is he going to be able to hit big league pitching?”



Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker tells an anecdote, on the presidential campaign trail, about buying a shirt at the Kohl’s department store. NBC’s Tonight Show, on Wednesday night, used some simultaneous video to show how he repeats the story using the very same sentences. A mildly amusing display of synchronized C-SPAN video.



Oops! Maybe the  Scott Walker recall election in 2012 was not such a good idea in retrospect. Such is the conclusion of liberal Chris Cillizza writing in the Washington Post. According to Cillizza, although the attempt to recall Walker was appealing to liberals at the time, it backfired in a big way by making the Wisconsin governor well known nationally to the extent that he now has a good shot at winning the 2016 Republican presidential nomination.

Cillizza tells his tale of political woe due to unexpected consequences:



Since Scott Walker is both a “threat to reproductive rights” and a deceitful doofus, he would be an unusually dangerous Republican presidential nominee, argued lefty pundit Marcotte in a Monday blog post for Slate.

If the race pits Walker against Hillary Clinton, the Wisconsin governor “could give her a real run for her money,” wrote Marcotte, “because Walker does a much better job than most of the Republican field at lulling low-information voters into thinking he's a moderate…[If] female and young voters…don’t realize that Walker is a scary woman-basher, they might not mobilize in the numbers Clinton needs. That's something Walker will be counting on.”