Liberal celebrity Seth MacFarlane is the creative force behind such TV projects as the disgusting Family Guy cartoon and the Star Trek ripoff series The Orville. He stated on Wednesday that he has been “open and honest” about his feelings regarding the Fox News Channel, which he described as ”incredibly destructive.” In addition, the producer and actor praised another TV project, the Showtime series The Loudest Voice, a program about Fox News pioneer Roger Ailes. MacFarlane, who plays Ailes’ assistant Brian Lewis, stated that production is “going beautifully.”



Talk-radio host and friend Chris Plante recently made an excellent point about Hollywood. As horrible new revelations of sexual misbehavior surface about CBS CEO Les Moonves, it’s highly unlikely anyone’s going to make a movie about him, or about Matt Lauer, or about Charlie Rose, and so on. But there are two fictional projects supposedly based on (and a new documentary about) the late Fox News boss Roger Ailes. 



Wednesday afternoon’s MSNBC Live illustrated where the left stood on the Brett Kavanaugh fiasco as host Katy Tur aired a video mash-up comparing Kavanaugh to other men such as the late Roger Ailes, Corey Lewandowski, Roy Moore, and Rob Porter because they too were firmly defended by President Trump as they faced their own allegations of sexual impropriety. In reality, Tur’s comparison is ghoulish at worst and, at best, misguided.



Apparently, a weekly show on NBC and a nightly show on MSNBC weren't large enough platforms for Chuck Todd to complain about troublesome conservatives, so he's written an article for the liberal magazine The Atlantic titled “It’s Time for the Press to Stop Complaining – And to Start Fighting Back.” Mr. Todd should just retract this bungling mess. 



During Monday morning’s edition of NBC’s Megyn Kelly Today program, the host led an extensive discussion regarding the charges of sexual harassment against Tom Brokaw and had some words of advice for the many women who have signed a letter supporting the former NBC Nightly News anchor. Referring to her experience with the late Roger Ailes, who was the chief executive officer for Fox News until he stepped down amid allegations of sexual misconduct in July of 2016, Kelly cautioned the NBC News colleagues who signed the letter: “You don’t know what you don’t know.”



“Do We Believe Women? Nation Takes Fresh Look At Sexual Harassment,” was the headline and the question posed by reporter Clyde Haberman in Wednesday’s New York Times . But that promised “look” at harassment in business and politics focused only on one side of the political aisle. The print version included an archive photo of Anita Hill from the 1991 U.S. Senate hearings regarding then-Supreme Court conservative nominee Clarence Thomas. Haberman cynically skipped from Republican-nominated Judge Thomas to the late Fox News Channel chairman Roger Ailes, with President Trump and Fox News’ Bill O’Reilly and Roger Ailes also mentioned. President Bill Clinton and his scandalous sex history was utterly ignored.



Former Fox News Channel anchor Bill O’Reilly told NBC’s Today co-host Matt Lauer on Tuesday that he “absolutely did nothing wrong” regarding the five women whose accusations of sexual harassment led to the end of his popular weeknight program, The O’Reilly Factor. However, he asserted that his dismissal was the result of an attempted sponsor boycott by liberal organizations, which led Lauer to ask if he was the victim of “a vast left-wing conspiracy.“ Don’t be sarcastic,” O’Reilly replied.



According to author, critic, and former Fox News Watch panelist Neal Gabler, there’s not much of a mystery about who killed “the idea of media objectivity.” The perp, Gabler alleges, was the late Roger Ailes. “Before Fox News, most people actually trusted the media,” wrote Gabler in a screed that ran Friday on Salon and was originally published at BillMoyers.com. 



Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

 



Roger Ailes was a media pioneer and a gifted political strategist, whose death leaves a large void in the journalism and political worlds. As the Media Research Center President Brent Bozell respectfully observed “The Left would command a monopoly control of the so-called ‘news’ media but for the Fox News Channel, and FNC would not exist but for him. The good Roger did for America is immeasurable.” It was Ailes’s creation of FNC that cracked the media elite’s monopoly on news that caused many liberal journalists to spew hate against the man, within just hours of his passing. The following are just some of the media’s most spiteful and hateful attacks on Roger Ailes.



In the New York Times Sunday Review, chief Hillary Clinton campaign reporter Amy Chozick (who is writing a book on the campaign) tells tales from the makeup room at sexist, biased Fox News in “Hillary, Roger, and Me.” The story’s text box: “Ailes made female reporters look like models, and Clinton like a criminal.” Chozick’s distaste for conservative-leaning television was apparent. She implied that it was just a shame that “poetic justice” wasn’t served, and that Hillary Clinton didn’t bring down Trump and Ailes herself.



Unintentionally inane sentence of the weekend, from Jon Klein, the former President of CNN/US, on the legacy of the late Roger Ailes, founder of the Fox News Channel: “By unreservedly infusing news with a right-of-center agenda, Ailes popularized the notion that all journalists are biased.” You read that correctly: The media were not widely seen as biased until Ailes created a biased network.