It appears as though, with the long-awaited release of the Department of Justice Inspector General’s report exposing anti-Trump bias by senior FBI investigators, Republican Congressional leadership was finally ready to call for an end to the Special Counsel’s investigation. After House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (CA) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (KY) spoke out, ABC’s Good Morning America was fearful for the future of the investigation on Sunday morning.



The public image of Special Counsel Robert Mueller has hit an all-time low. The obvious reason is that after a year of intense investigations and indictments, they are still unrelated to his mission. Even the leftist Nation magazine has noticed that "The Mueller Indictments Still Don't Add Up to Collusion."
 



On Thursday, while reporting on the latest developments in the Russia investigation, neither ABC’s Good Morning America nor CBS This Morning made any mention of a new poll showing Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s favorability with the American people dropping to lowest level since the probe began over a year ago. NBC’s Today show did manage to note the survey, but only for a mere 17 seconds.



Former National Intelligence Director James Clapper was the subject of a sickly sweet interview for technology magazine Wired: “How A Former US Spy Chief Became Trump’s Fiercest Critic.” The loving interview was penned by Garrett Graff, former editor in chief of The Washingtonian and deputy national press secretary for liberal Democratic governor and presidential candidate Howard Dean. Isn’t it odd that the technology-loving, privacy-embracing rebels at Wired are so enthusiastically taking the side of the national security state and domestic surveillance?



During Wednesday’s edition of Morning Joe, co-host Joe Scarborough took shots at former Clinton pollster Mark Penn, who wrote an op-ed in The Hill entitled “Stopping Robert Mueller to Protect Us All.” Scarborough tried to impugn Penn’s motives for advocating an end to the Russia investigation, wondering “what is Mark Penn selling coming to the defense of Donald J. Trump” and repeatedly asking if he has “a Fox News contract?”



Wednesday saw the latest edition of CNN’s New Day co-host Chris Cuomo throwing down with Ohio Republican Congressman Jim Jordan as the topics du jour featured calls for a second special counsel, Russian collusion, and a Thursday meeting of congressional Republicans having access to some of the most sensitive documents related to the Trump-Russia probe.



Today’s journalists routinely assert that it is “extreme,” “dangerous,” and possibly even criminal for the White House – or anyone else, for that matter – to criticize an investigation into the President. But twenty years ago, Independent Counsel Ken Starr was savaged by the same liberal media during his investigation of then-President Bill Clinton. At that time, Starr was harangued as a “partisan” and “inept prosecutor,” and a “peeping Tom.”



Early Tuesday night, Daily Caller media reporter Justin Caruso flagged some Grade A insanity on MSNBC’s Deadline: White House as Clinton-era Deputy Assistant Attorney General Harry Litman compared criticism of the Trump-Russia probe and calls for oversight to the Nazis bombing campaign on London in World War II (known as The Blitz).



PBS NewsHour anchor Judy Woodruff asked her regular Friday pundits David Brooks and Mark Shields to evaluate the Robert Mueller probe after a year. Shields, for his part, took out a verbal baseball bat and began attacking House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes as not only stupid and immature, but as the 21st century equivalent of Joe McCarthy:



The anti-Trump Resistance appeared to have been dealt a crippling blow Wednesday evening when news broke that Special Counsel Robert Mueller couldn’t indict President Trump. The revelation came from Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani who said Mueller admitted to him, investigators would be following decades-old DOJ guidelines that say a sitting president cannot be indicted. This Washington-shaking news went largely unreported by the network evening broadcasts. In contrast, they spent over nine minutes on pointless pop culture news.



When Vice President Mike Pence sat down for interviews with all three broadcast networks early Thursday morning, just moments after greeting three American detainees who had arrived back in the U.S. after being released from North Korea, he was logically peppered with questions about the Korean peace process. However, unlike her ABC and CBS colleagues, NBC’s Andrea Mitchell only asked a couple questions on the topic before moving on to grill Pence about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation.



The television networks have flooded us with hours and hours of coverage of the Robert Mueller probe, still looking under every rock for some sign of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign. But on May 5, a federal judge harshly blasted Mueller’s tactics in court, even going to far as to challenge the scope of his authority in this probe. Was this a big story for our objective press, insisting they give us a dispassionate examination of the facts? No. This was a test, and they flunked it.