On Sunday's Reliable Sources on CNN, while introducing a segment about how to deal with a President Donald Trump when he "lies" about something, host Brian Stelter dubiously included a clip of former President George W. Bush from his April 2013 speech declaring that the U.S. had "prevailed" in Iraq as an example of Presidents telling "lies" alongside deliberate presidential deceptions like Bill Clinton's "I did not have sexual relations with that woman," Barack Obama's "If you like your current insurance, you keep that insurance," and Richard Nixon's "I'm not a crook."



NBC’s new drama Timeless brought us back to 1972 during the episode “The Watergate Tape” where we are told America is involved in a major conspiracy, and like a cancer, should be attacked.



NBC’s The Good Place aired the episode “…Someone Like Me as a Member” Thursday and put President Richard Nixon's infamous tapes in the same category with dictator Benito Mussolini's fascist speeches.



Students of the Watergate era (or those old enough to have lived through it) will recall the "dirty tricks" played by Richard Nixon's henchmen, most notably Donald Segretti. Segretti, who was hired by Nixon's deputy assistant, Dwight Chapin, was tasked with smearing Democrats, including senator and 1972 presidential candidate, Edmund Muskie of Maine. Among several "tricks," Segretti composed a fake letter on Muskie's letterhead falsely alleging that Sen. Henry "Scoop" Jackson (D-WA) had fathered a child with a 17-year-old girl.



In a discussion of modern electoral fraud, MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell on Monday offered a journalistic slip: She admitted that the 1960 presidential election was “obviously” “stolen” from Richard Nixon. Talking about a “constitutional crisis” if Donald Trump does not concede the presidential election, Mitchell blurted, “How have we come to this point? Some of the better moments in American history, the peaceful transfer of power.” 



In a pre-recorded report shown on Friday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, correspondent Gary Tuchman recalled examples of "dirty campaigning" in presidential elections going back 200 years, but, when he got to more recent elections, he focused on negative campaigning from the Republican side -- citing Richard Nixon, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush and Donald Trump -- while ignoring infamous examples from the left except for current candidate Hillary Clinton.



Appearing as a guest on Friday's Wolf show, liberal CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley tagged Donald Trump as the "kingpin" of "dog whistles and innuendo about race," charging that the GOP presidential candidate is "looking for racist votes." He also worked in a dig at Richard Nixon as he accused the former Republican President of campaigning on the term "law and order" as a "clever way to be a bigot."



In a few months, Barack Obama will become the fifth post-World War II president to serve two full terms. The Washington Monthly’s Martin Longman thinks Obama tops the other four in terms of “popularity and moral credibility,” as indicated not only by the positive reception Obama got for his Wednesday-night DNC speech boosting Hillary Clinton, but by the public’s curiosity beforehand about what he’d have to say. In a Thursday post, Longman contrasted Obama with the other two-termers at their last convention as POTUS.



Appearing as a panel member on Tuesday's special edition of Inside Politics, CNN senior political reporter Nia-Malika Henderson warned that "a lot of people" believe that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump's invocation of "law and order" has a "racist undertone." Moments later, she went on to assert that the election is "all about race in a lot of ways," before backing off slightly by adding that "at least a lot of people think that.



On Sunday's PoliticsNation on MSNBC, it was ironic enough that Daily Beast columnist and MSNBC analyst Jonathan Alter tried to indict GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump on "race" in the presence of career race-hustler and MSNBC host Al Sharpton, but, moments later, the liberal Alter made a point of praising Sharpton as having a "distinguished history as a street protester." That "distinguished history" of Sharpton's includes inciting riots -- some anti-Semitic in nature -- that resulted in arson and a number of homicides.



After last week’s police-involved fatal shootings in Baton Rouge and suburban St. Paul, Jeb Lund argued that such deaths happen not because of a few racist cops, but because over the past five decades millions of voters have rewarded politicians who propose and enact racist laws. In an article that appeared Thursday prior to the murder of five police officers in Dallas, Lund declared that “both parties figured out just how much of a can't-lose proposition it was to call for more cops, harsher interdiction and zero tolerance, all while finding new drugs, new addicts and new terms for low-income criminals that broadcast one general image to voters: Bad black people.”



On Monday's AC360, CNN's Anderson Cooper and his guests likened Donald Trump to Richard Nixon. David Gergen decried the billionaire revoking The Washington Post's press credentials: "That's extraordinary! Why would he do something so stupid?" Cooper replied, "He's assembling an enemies list, like presidents have in the past." Gloria Borger interjected, "Most presidents, like Richard Nixon, keep it private....Donald Trump publicizes it; and says, this is my list."