During Thursday night’s edition of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert on CBS, the liberal host made an interesting comment about how he believes President Donald Trump should leave the White House. He made the remarks while interviewing guest Diane Sawyer, who had interviewed the GOP occupant of the White House back in 1999.



Once upon a time I was nineteen. (No comments, please.) I have related part of this story in a speech a few months back at my alma mater, Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. In the wake of what has become a controversial CNN Townhall meeting on the Florida shooting, there is a media aspect of my tale that I neglected to relate --- and the reaction to the Florida CNN Townhall reminds.



On Friday night during a discussion of the Nunes memo's release, CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley complained that -- unlike when Richard Nixon was President -- there now exist outlets like Fox News and Breitbart that act as an "echo chamber," theorizing that President Donald Trump could not survive "without the oxygen that's being pumped in to him on Fox."



WASHINGTON — Last week the headlines should have abounded with the year's good news. It was the economy: gross domestic product was up some 3 percent and, for the last quarter, nearly 4 percent; unemployment was down to a 17-year low, with black unemployment at the lowest level since such statistics were compiled. The stock market was soaring, up some 40 percent since Donald Trump was elected, and inflation was low. 



On Thursday's CNN Tonight, during a discussion of President Donald Trump reportedly using incendiary language to refer to Haiti and other Third World countries, CNN presidential historian Douglas Brinkley declared that Trump is "the most racist President since Woodrow Wilson," and suggested he might even be worse.



Actress Meryl Streep appeared as guest on Jimmy Kimmel Live Monday evening, where she talked with the late-night talk show host about her new political drama, The Post, about the Washington paper’s involvement in publishing classified government documents about the Vietnam War.



Robert Redford, who is best known for starring in such movies as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Sting and All the President’s Men, wrote an article for the December 11 issue of TIME magazine, which describes him as also a “director, producer and environmental activist.”



On Saturday's AM Joy on MSNBC, as the show spent much of its time reacting to President Donald Trump's response to white racists rallying in Charlottesville last weekend, recurring MSNBC guest and self-described Republican Richard Painter repeatedly demonized the Christian right as he lumped them in with white racists as extremists who should be denounced by Trump and other Republican leaders to drive them out of the party. Painter -- a former legal counsel for the George W. Bush White House -- trashed conservative Christians as "fake Christians" and "phony Christians" who "couldn't read a Bible if they tried."

 



One can always count on the left to overreach. Thursday’s Hardball featured MSNBC legal analyst Paul Butler arguing that President Trump’s Charlottesville response was only a continuation of “white racism” put forth by former Republican Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan. To make the show’s more loony, guest Erroll Southers later argued that “the right-wing” is “the greatest threat to our nation’s homeland and national security” thanks to Trump.



Appearing as a guest in a pre-recorded interview for the Sunday, August 13, Fareed Zakaria GPS on CNN, far-left HBO comedian Bill Maher declared that he hopes there is a "crash" in the stock market so that it will hurt President Donald Trump's political support. A bit later, he also repeated a discredited myth parroted over and over again by the Left that Ronald Reagan began his 1980 presidential campaign in Philadelphia, Mississippi, as a "dog whistle" to appeal to racism.

 



New York magazine's June 26/July 9 cover story dreaming of a Trump impeachment, “How A Presidency Ends,” is by veteran liberal essayist Frank Rich, who worked at the New York Times for decades. The cover shows a “photo illustration” of Donald Trump in Richard Nixon’s outstretched-arms “V for Victory” pose. The inside headline counseled patience on the part of the magazine’s liberal readership: “Just Wait -- Watergate didn’t become Watergate overnight, either.”



There’s only one “normal” major party left in America, argued Jamelle Bouie on Tuesday. In Bouie’s view, Democrats, “as evidenced by the rapid and normal transfer of power from President Obama to President Trump,” believe that our system “only works if both sides see each other as legitimate actors with the right to wield power should they win it…But increasingly, it seems the GOP does not…We’ve moved from ordinary partisan competition -- even partisan hardball -- to something ominous and illiberal.”