Always out to make the Republicans look bad, on Thursday night’s All In, MSNBC host Chris Hayes decided to smear the entirety of the Republican Party since the Reagan era as racists. Hayes began by introducing a recently uncovered 1971 phone call recorded between then-President Richard Nixon and then-California Governor Ronald Reagan, in which Reagan, in a moment of human imperfection made some less-than-decent statements about African people.



During Wednesday’s edition of The Beat With Ari Melber, the eponymous host shared some “new information and context for President Trump’s race-baiting rhetoric and discriminatory policies.” This “new information” came in the form of indefensible comments from then-California Governor and Future President Ronald Reagan and the then-President Richard Nixon, which Melber gleefully used as a lynchpin to attack Republicans and conservatives as racist.



Remember, folks, CNN wants you to think that CNN Tonight’s Don Lemon is merely a “CNN anchor” and an objective journalist instead of a left-wing pundit. Keep that in mind as, while opening Wednesday’s show, he gloated about how the President’s suffering a “losing streak” to the point that he put on an “embarrassing” performance in the Rose Garden.



On Tuesday, after concluding a full report for NBC’s Today show marking 50 years since the election of Richard Nixon, Senior Correspondent Tom Brokaw expressed his hope that the country, and particularly President Trump, would be “learning” a lesson from the White House scandal.



During Monday’s CNN Tonight, host Don Lemon discussed a portrait of President Trump alongside previous Republican Presidents with  New York Magazine art critic Jerry Saltz.  According to Lemon, the image has received “a whole lot of attention” after Lesley Stahl conducted an interview with President Trump for CBS’s 60 Minutes in the private residence at the White House, where the painting was hung on the wall.  Somehow, the topics of race and Joseph Stalin managed to come up in the discussion of the portrait.



So which is it? Is The New York Times a newspaper — a journalistic outfit? Or is The New York Times a Deep State co-conspirator against a sitting President of the United States? As the world knows, this past week, The Times opinion section published a piece titled: “I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration; I work for the president but like-minded colleagues and I have vowed to thwart parts of his agenda and his worst inclination.”



This morning, the news and cable networks were abuzz with talk of “Watergate” and impeachment, salivating over the idea that Michael Cohen’s plea deal would lead to Trump’s ousting. Over and over again, the media compared the betrayal of the President’s former personal lawyer to Nixon’s scandal, calling Trump an “unindicted co-conspirator” in a scandal that was as big as Watergate.



WASHINGTON — It has been a pretty good week for Donald Trump. The economy is growing faster than anyone on the left or in the middle or among the Never-Trumpers believed possible. Inflation is low, and employment is at a record high. Moreover, the president and the European Union reached an understanding on trade last week that signals the likely end of a trade war, at least with Europe.



During Thursday’s edition of Morning Joe, the panel lost their collective mind over Vice President Mike Pence telling NBC’s Andrea Mitchell that he would “respectfully encourage the Special Counsel and his team to bring their work to completion.” Co-host Joe Scarborough went so far as to compare the Vice President, whom he had previously referred to as a “Hapless Indiana Hoosier,” to Richard Nixon’s first Vice President Spiro Agnew, who had to resign because of corruption charges.



During Saturday's edition of AM Joy, host Joy Reid opened her show with video footage from a 1972 edition of NBC Nightly News announcing that the Democratic National Committee had filed a lawsuit against the Committee for the Re-Election of the President and five men who had broken into the Democratic National Committee's Headquarters at the Watergate Complex.



During Thursday night’s edition of The Late Show With Stephen Colbert on CBS, the liberal host made an interesting comment about how he believes President Donald Trump should leave the White House. He made the remarks while interviewing guest Diane Sawyer, who had interviewed the GOP occupant of the White House back in 1999.



Once upon a time I was nineteen. (No comments, please.) I have related part of this story in a speech a few months back at my alma mater, Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. In the wake of what has become a controversial CNN Townhall meeting on the Florida shooting, there is a media aspect of my tale that I neglected to relate --- and the reaction to the Florida CNN Townhall reminds.