Our friends at Grabien spotted a solid example on Monday morning’s New Day of CNN bias as co-host Alisyn Camerota asserted that it’ll be “shame on” Democrats if they “can’t seize on” the President’s “waffling” during the government shutdown, adding that “this is their moment.” Yikes. It sounds like she was trying to be a coach giving her players a motivational pep talk before playing in a championship game against an arch rival.



What did David Axelrod and David Gergen want to see happen on Friday morning that the U.S. Capitol Rotunda ceremony honoring the late John McCain? A 2018 version of the Paul Wellstone memorial from 2002? Following the moving event as McCain lied in State at the place he spent over three decades in both the House and Senate, Axelrod and Gergen condemned the remarks by House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for failing to properly honor McCain’s values and, as men, not sufficiently opposing Donald Trump.



The emails of Lois Lerner and other IRS officials are gone forever. Therefore any more complaints about it are nothing but Republican nitpicking. Case closed.

That pretty much sums up the attitude of Politico writer Rachael Bade whose Wednesday article title pretty much sums up what she portrays as the futility of any more investigation into retrieving those missing emails, "Sources: Lois Lerner’s emails likely gone forever." Got that? Or so she seems to hope. However, her writing off the possibility of ever finding those emails elicited a tidal wave of response from Politico readers with over 21,000 comments, many of which begged to differ with her hasty conclusion. First let us read Ms Bade hopefully bid goodbye forever on the chances of IRS email recovery:



"Ex-IRS official Lois Lerner’s crashed hard drive has been recycled, making it likely the lost emails of the lightning rod in the tea party targeting controversy will never be found, according to multiple sources," Politico's Rachael Bade reported Wednesday evening.

Although the revelation has congressional Republicans understandably furious and at least one prominent IT expert trashing the IRS's digital documents-retention policy as "mind-boggling", the Big Three broadcast networks all ignored the latest developments in the IRS saga on their Thursday evening newscasts, even as they had time for Harrison Ford's broken leg (NBC), a new technology for police car chases (ABC), and comedian Tracy Morgan's car accident (CBS).



Once again, as it did a month ago in two separate stories, the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, left the name of Lois Lerner, the former IRS official who ran its section on tax-exempt organizations, out of its headline and opening paragraph. This time, for good measure, AP reporter Stephen Ohlemacher didn't reveal Lerner's name until Paragraph 3.

Before getting to Ohlemacher's journalistic malpractice, let's take a look at the how the Politico handled the same story of Congress holding Ms. Lerner in contempt yesterday, and at one example of how the AP itself covered the story of another controversial figure's anticipated congressional appearance in the 1980s.