Fox News Channel host Bill O'Reilly used Wednesday evening's edition of The O'Reilly Factor to hammer “haters on both sides” of the political divide during a segment entitled “Hating President Obama.”

He began by stating: “At the height of the Iraq War, the vilification of President Bush the younger was off the chart,” with “the left in America accusing him and Vice President Dick Cheney of lying to get us into the war.”



During a press conference on Friday, Ed Henry -- the Fox News Channel's chief White House correspondent -- stated that former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani has been harshly criticized for claiming that Barack Obama does not love America.

Henry then compared that remark with one made by then-candidate Obama when he charged that then-president George W. Bush was “irresponsible” and “unpatriotic” for increasing the federal debt by $4 trillion during his two terms in the White House.



Michael Moore took to his Facebook account on Sunday night to unleash a lengthy post lamenting how “a man with integrity” in Brian Williams was being punished for “committing the crime of Faux Macho due to his claim of being on the wrong chopper,” while members of the Bush administration “roam free” and get away with being “the real liars who were responsible for the Iraq War.” 



In an angry editorial published in the Sunday edition of the New York Times, the newspaper's editorial board called on president Barack Obama to “Prosecute Torturers and Their Bosses.”

The list of offenders “in a credible investigation” is a long one, including former vice president Dick Cheney; his chief of staff, David Addington; former CIA director George Tenet; and John Yoo and Jay Bybee, the lawyers for the Office of Legal Counsel who helped draft the documents clearing the way for “enhanced interrogation“ of prisoners and enemy combatants.



On Monday night, ABC News continued to report on the impending release of a report on the CIA’s post-9/11 interrogation methods as though partisanship had no role when, in fact, Democrats on the Senate Intelligence Committee are the very reason it was compiled and will be released.
                                        
Following a morning in which ABC’s Good Morning America and NBC’s Today made no mention of the political reasoning, ABC kept the streak going on World News Tonight with David Muir with another report from ABC News chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz.



On Tuesday evening, the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley was the only broadcast network newscast to have any coverage of the upcoming midterm elections, which are four weeks away from Tuesday. 

While that was the case, the just over two-minute-long segment wasn’t free of liberal bias, as it criticized Republican candidates for running ads on the issue of fighting the Islamic terrorist group ISIS since President Obama “does have a strategy now” for confronting the group in Iraq and Syria.



On Thursday morning, CBS continued to ignore key results of the latest CBS News/New York Times poll, which show President Obama’s approval rating at 40 percent and his foreign policy approval rating at only 34 percent. 

In contrast, the front-page New York Times article by Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Dalia Sussman included dire statistics about the President’s low domestic approval rating: “The results suggest a profoundly unsettled public mood, with two-thirds of Americans surveyed saying the country is on the wrong track and half disapproving of how Mr. Obama is doing his job, a negative assessment that threatens to be a substantial drag on Democrats in November.”



On Wednesday, CBS and The New York Times made the point of omitting results from their own poll which show President Obama’s job approval at 40 percent and his approval on foreign policy at only 34 percent from the newscasts and print newspaper, respectively.

CBS This Morning and the CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley only mentioned the latest CBS News/New York Times poll in regards to how 57 percent of Americans do not feel as though the President is being tough enough in dealing with the threat posed by the Islamic terrorist group ISIS. At the other end of the spectrum, only 31 percent of those asked said they approved of his handling of ISIS.



On Monday's The O'Reilly Factor on FNC, as host Bill O'Reilly and FNC analyst Bernard Goldberg discussed former CBS anchor Dan Rather's decision to cancel an interview with O'Reilly to promote his new book, Rather Outspoken: My Life in the News, and discuss the Memogate scandal that led to his firing from CBS, Goldberg characterized Rather as being "obsessed" with the scandal like Captain Ahab and Moby Dick because it will likely overshadow his legacy and other work.

Goldberg:



Perhaps using a preemptive strike to help combat the May jobs report to be released on Friday, MSNBC has already found an excuse for lost jobs, and an increased unemployment rate – storms, tornadoes and flooding.  According to a business report:

“…homes or places of business have been destroyed in this year's wave of storms, tornadoes and flooding. That means thousands of workers in the South and Midwest could be out of work for some time, potentially pushing up the nation's jobless rate and further taxing financially strapped state unemployment funds.”

Yet in 2004, when reporting on an October jobs report in which hiring had increased at the fastest pace in seven months, MSNBC somehow managed to find analysts who said the jump in hiring was due mainly to another form of natural disaster – hurricanes.  The business report at that time read:

“Some analysts were skeptical about the latest surge of hiring, pointing out that much of the unusually large jump in October stemmed from cleanup and rebuilding in Florida and other states that were ravaged by four hurricanes…”

That assessment is buoyed by an accompanying CNBC video (seen below) in which Senior Economics Reporter, Steve Liesman, asks President Bush’s economic advisor, Gregory Mankiw, about the ‘Hurricane Effect’ on a jobs report.



Sunday was an historic day for America, an historic victory in the War on Terror - Usama Bin Laden, the man who had ordered the death of over 3,000 Americans on 9/11, had finally been  killed.   It was also an historic revelation that, conducting the war according to far-left liberal policies would have prevented this day from ever happening.



CNN contributor and Democrat extraordinaire Paul Begala's Bush Derangement Syndrome got the better of him during a panel discussion on Tuesday's AC360 (as Mary Matalin correctly pointed out later in the segment) when he compared Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal's lie about serving in Vietnam to Condoleezza Rice's 2004 gaffe where she called former President Bush "my husband" [audio available here].

Thirty-one minutes into the 10 pm Eastern hour, anchor Anderson Cooper asked Begala about Blumenthal's statement earlier on Tuesday where he claimed he "misspoke" his false claim about serving during the Vietnam War: "I think only politicians use that word 'misspoke.' Other people call it a lie or just a mistake. But he says he accepts responsibility for misspeaking. What do you make of that?"

The CNN political contributor's answer started out in a reasonable manner, but soon descended into the bizarre, to use his own word. Cooper even expressed his utter surprise that Begala had somehow fit the Bush administration into his answer (the rest of the panel erupted in laughter at Cooper's retort, and obviously at Begala's expense).