A mini-war broke out yesterday between the Washington Post's Philip Bump, who would apparently prefer to keep discussions of Hillary Clinton's health off the table, and Matt Drudge. As would be expected, Drudge won in a rout, while Bump continues to pretend that he didn't.

Bump, in his disingenuous Friday morning entry at the Post's all too appropriately named "The Fix" blog, told readers that his own doctor's opinion concerning Mrs. Clinton's health should trump Drudge's. Bump should have known better — maybe he did, and didn't care, rolling the dice on Drudge ignoring him. The issue isn't Bump's doctor, who has never examined Mrs. Clinton, versus Drudge. It's Bump's doctor versus a media-published statement made by Mrs. Clinton's own doctor.



It's bad enough, as Bryan Ballas at NewsBusters noted on May 16, that the Washington Post's Philip Bump dishonestly used last week's Amtrak tragedy to rip Republican members of Congress for somehow being responsible for the (theoretically) for-profit entity's "constant struggle" for funding.

As Sean Davis at the Federalist explained, Amtrak has really had no funding struggles. Bump had to make things up to create that impression, and even when caught, issued a "clarification" containing serious errors (HT Patterico; bolds are mine):



With at least seven dead and hundreds more injured in Tuesday’s Amtrak crash, many in the nation have paused for a moment to lament and pray for the dead and wounded. The same cannot be said for Philip Bump of the Washington Post, who rushed on Wednesday to note “House Republicans had planned to spend Wednesday marking up a transportation spending bill that included steep cuts to the budget for Amtrak, the federally funded passenger train service.”

Bump explained why these cut-cut-cut Republicans wanted to cut Amtrak: their constituents don’t use it.



Ted Cruz really knows how to put liberal teeth on edge. See this Washington Post headline: “Cruz compares climate change activists to ‘flat-Earthers.’ Where to begin?”

Post reporter Philip Bump took it upon himself to try and rebut Cruz point by point, saying “there’s not much Cruz got right here.”



Late Friday afternoon, roughly two hours ("shortly after noon" Pacific Time) after the press release announcing Oregon Democratic Governor John Kitzhaber's resignation effective next Wednesday, Philip Bump at the Washington Post's "The Fix" blog tried to explain away the national press's nearly complete failure to cover Kitzhaber's mounting ethical and now potentially criminal problems for nearly four months. This is the same bunch which obsessed over Republican Governor Chris Christie's "Bridgegate" non-scandal for months on end.

Bump specifically linked to and quoted — and, predictably mischaracterized — yours truly's related Thursday afternoon post at NewsBusters. The short answer to Bump's whining is simply that Kitzhaber's problems were self-evidently very serious from the get-go in October, and grew by degrees with virtually each passing week, while Bridgegate, which was beaten like a drum for months on end, never progressed beyond the status of a pathetically weak hatchet job.



The Washington Post on Thursday apparently discovered that Alaska is a sparsely populated state. In an online article, writer Philip Bump repeatedly complained about the small turnout in the Republican senatorial primary, making the same point over and over for seven paragraphs. 

Regarding Republican Dan Sullivan's vote total, Bump worried that it was "just over 36,000 -- enough for him to have won just one other Senate primary: Hawaii's. Sullivan, in fact, received fewer votes than 20 Republicans who lost their Senate races." The journalist admitted, "This is not a mystery in the least; Alaska is not very populous." Still, he attacked the vote totals anyway.  



During the 2008 presidential campaign, GOP Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin made what has turned out to be a prescient remark about the relevance of a U.S. president's resolve and its potential impact on Russia's posture with the old Soviet Union's satellite states. She observed: "After the Russian Army invaded the nation of Georgia, Senator Obama's reaction was one of indecision and moral equivalence, the kind of response that would only encourage Russia's Putin to invade Ukraine next."

Many in the press ridiculed that notion. Among them was Blake Hounshell, who was then blogging at Foreign Policy Magazine. Characterizing Palin's notion as "strange," he wrote: "As we've said before, this is an extremely far-fetched scenario." Hounshell, now a deputy editor at Politico Magazine, has handled Palin's self-effacing Facebook "I told you so" ("I could see this one from Alaska") and pile-ons by center-right blogs too numerous to mention with tweets demonstrating the class, dignity, and good sportsmanship you would expect from the high-brow commentariat, i.e., none (HT Twitchy).



We shouldn’t be surprised that the liberal media is frustrated over the fact that pro-life conservatives won a monumental battle in Texas on July 13.  HB-2, which was signed into law by Gov. Perry yesterday bans abortions after 20-weeks into a pregnancy.  It also mandates that abortion clinics upgrade their medical equipment – and be reclassified as surgical medical centers. 

Particularly annoyed with the new law was one Philip Bump of the Atlantic.  In his July 18 piece, Bump groused that Perry passed political optics 101 by having plenty of women with him at HB-2's signing ceremony.