Trump Russia! Trump Russia! Trump Russia! 24/7 coverage by the mainstream media. Investigations! Impeachment must be right around the corner! Must have it! Gotta have it! If not, we could lose our liberal minds!!!


The Washington Post just couldn't let it go. After going full absurd with their speculation on May 10 that a Russian photographer in the Oval Office could have planted a recording device, they doubled down in their absurdity with yet more derangement on the same topic the following day. This time it was their national correspondent Philip Bump who volunteered to make a laughingstock of himself. Bump's hilarious speculation starts with the very title of his article, Here’s how the Russians might have snuck a recording device into the Oval Office.


Political reporter Philip Bump of The Washington Post just had to dip into the yellowed pages of media history so he could post this headline on Saturday: “In 1927, Fox News Service filmed Benito Mussolini telling immigrants to ‘make America great’: Every word of that is true.”


Philip Bump and the Washington Post have apparently had a couple of pretty bad days. The Post had to endure having to cover, and cover for, an absolutely awful jobs report released Friday morning. That news made their beloved Dear Leader, who had just celebrated the allegedly wonderful economic accomplishments seen during his presidency on Wednesday, look quite foolish. Never fear: By Paragraph 4 of its related story, the Post found an "expert" who claimed that "This just does not square with all the other things we’re seeing in the economy." Actually, the job market has been virtually the only exception to otherwise uniformly weak data since the fourth quarter of last year.

Perhaps partially influenced by the bad jobs news, Bump, who toils at the Post's "The Fix" blog, came completely unhinged in reacting to a Thursday evening retweet by presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.


The Washington Post's Philip Bump followed the Huffington Post's example on Thursday in semi-seriously pursuing whether Ted Cruz is, in fact, "Lucifer in the flesh," as former House Speaker John Boehner recently put it. But instead of turning to a Satanist, the journalist consulted with a pastor/exorcist, even though he admitted that "of course there was no truth" to the Republican's jab at the Texas senator.


For several months, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders has claimed that he has not taken money from Wall Street firms or superPACs. Instead, the Vermont senator has stated he has received millions of donations that average $27 each, which was considered a testament to his grassroots support.

However, Washington Post reporter Philip Bump challenged that figure on Monday as being closer to $29 apiece, a claim that resulted in a deluge of criticism from angry Sanders supporters who considered the article “a pointless and petty hit job.”


The terror bombings in Brussels occured at about 3:00 AM EDT. Therefore Washington Post writer Philip Bump had only about a couple of hours after he woke up today to use these acts of terrorism as a platform to rapidly type up an article about his real obsession in this matter, Donald Trump, when it was posted at 9:25 AM EDT. You will search his story in vain for any expression of sympathy for the victims. The closest Bump comes is mentioning that dozens were killed in the first sentence, the same sentence he uses to launch his Trump attack:


According to NewsBusters' own Blonde Gator, Hillary Clinton has, in the 8-1/2 months since she declared her candidacy, committed 51 gaffes and goofs. That's an average rate of six per month. Imagine how many there would be if Mrs. Clinton genuinely campaigned among the people instead of among preselected groupies.

One of her latest gaffes, which occurred last week at an elementary school in Iowa, was a humdinger. Predictably, the establishment press almost completely ignored it, while a couple of journalists who noticed the center-right's reaction tried and failed to excuse it.


A mini-war broke out yesterday between the Washington Post's Philip Bump, who would apparently prefer to keep discussions of Hillary Clinton's health off the table, and Matt Drudge. As would be expected, Drudge won in a rout, while Bump continues to pretend that he didn't.

Bump, in his disingenuous Friday morning entry at the Post's all too appropriately named "The Fix" blog, told readers that his own doctor's opinion concerning Mrs. Clinton's health should trump Drudge's. Bump should have known better — maybe he did, and didn't care, rolling the dice on Drudge ignoring him. The issue isn't Bump's doctor, who has never examined Mrs. Clinton, versus Drudge. It's Bump's doctor versus a media-published statement made by Mrs. Clinton's own doctor.


It's bad enough, as Bryan Ballas at NewsBusters noted on May 16, that the Washington Post's Philip Bump dishonestly used last week's Amtrak tragedy to rip Republican members of Congress for somehow being responsible for the (theoretically) for-profit entity's "constant struggle" for funding.

As Sean Davis at the Federalist explained, Amtrak has really had no funding struggles. Bump had to make things up to create that impression, and even when caught, issued a "clarification" containing serious errors (HT Patterico; bolds are mine):


With at least seven dead and hundreds more injured in Tuesday’s Amtrak crash, many in the nation have paused for a moment to lament and pray for the dead and wounded. The same cannot be said for Philip Bump of the Washington Post, who rushed on Wednesday to note “House Republicans had planned to spend Wednesday marking up a transportation spending bill that included steep cuts to the budget for Amtrak, the federally funded passenger train service.”

Bump explained why these cut-cut-cut Republicans wanted to cut Amtrak: their constituents don’t use it.


Ted Cruz really knows how to put liberal teeth on edge. See this Washington Post headline: “Cruz compares climate change activists to ‘flat-Earthers.’ Where to begin?”

Post reporter Philip Bump took it upon himself to try and rebut Cruz point by point, saying “there’s not much Cruz got right here.”