On Monday, economist turned partisan hack Paul Krugman recycled his pompous lecture against what he calls “false equivalence," by which he means journalistic fairness toward Republicans. Every one of his examples of “false equivalence” coincidentally involves a Republican allegedly getting a free-ride in the news media -- which would come as quite a shock for NewsBusters readers -- while Hillary Clinton is unfairly slammed at every turn. And media reporter Jim Rutenberg warned the television media off of potential coverage of Benghazi and Bill Clinton’s sex scandals at the Republican convention.



On Wednesday, House Democrats staged a sit-it on the House floor trying bring their failed Senate bills to a vote in the House. Many are calling their actions a publicity stunt, and they seem to be right. All three of the liberal networks were glued to Capitol Hill during their evening broadcasts. “The dramatic sit-in on Capitol Hill,” ABC’s David Muir touted on World News Tonight, “Sitting down, demanding action on gun control.” The sit-in also gave them the opportunity to trash House Republicans.



El presidente de la Cámara de Representantes, Paul Ryan, y los miembros republicanos de ese cuerpo anunciaron un plan integral para combatir la pobreza en Estados Unidos, pero hasta ahora Univisión y Telemundo han ignorado con esmero la propuesta.



Andrew Breiner carried water for socially-liberal activists and their congressional allies in a Monday item for Roll Call. Breiner, who previously worked for the left-wing website Think Progress, hyped how "House Democrats are criticizing congressional Republicans for...their refusal to call the [Orlando] massacre an anti-LGBT hate crime." The writer then spotlighted Twitter posts from 16 Republicans politicians and included the score that each received from "leading LGBT equality group," the Human Rights Campaign.



When liberals call Republicans “deniers,” it typically has to do with climate change. Jonathan Chait alleges big-time GOP denial on a non-scientific matter. “Republican voting support is increasingly coterminous with white racial resentment even as conservatives firmly believe in their own racial innocence,” wrote Chait in a Tuesday post. “Conservatives deny the existence of racism in the Republican Party as a matter of doctrinal sanctity, just as Soviet authorities had to officially deny the existence of poverty in the USSR.”

While Chait has no use for the economic and fiscal proposals advanced by Paul Ryan and other House Republicans, he acknowledged that their ideas “have no intellectual connection to racism.” Nonetheless, “the trouble for Republicans is that building a real-world constituency for these policies does rely on racism. Conservatives stopped the momentum of the New Deal in the mid-1960s only when they associated it with support for the black underclass. Republican politics has grown increasingly racialized over time, a trend that has dramatically accelerated during the Obama era.”



Conservative Paul Ryan and liberal Lithwick agree that Donald Trump’s recent digs at Gonzalo Curiel were racist, but disagree about their significance. Ryan considers the attacks peculiar to Trump, while Lithwick sees them as of a piece with the Republican party’s “wider assault on the judiciary in the Obama era.”

Lithwick even wondered rhetorically, “Do Trump’s smears of Judge Curiel differ all that greatly from Senate Republicans’ refusal to even hold a hearing for Merrick Garland…? Sure, nobody on the Senate Judiciary Committee is calling Garland a biased Mexican. But the baseless, one-sided campaign to discredit a respected federal judge they once praised as moderate and well-qualified is just as damaging as Trump’s personal vindictiveness.”



During Thursday night's edition of The Kelly File on the Fox News Channel, the host and three panelists mocked cable television coverage of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's meeting with Paul Ryan, GOP speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Megyn Kelly led the charge by accusing the Cable News Network and MSNBC of treating Trump's arrival as if “it was the second coming." One of her favorite things in the coverage was a liberal cable channel's banner that read: “Breaking News: Trump Gives Thumbs Up Heading Into Meeting.”



During an interview with House Speaker Paul Ryan on Tuesday’s CBS This Morning, co-host Gayle King cued up a clip of Hamilton actor Lin-Manuel Miranda rapping his demand that Congress provide financial aid to Puerto Rico. On HBO’s Last Week Tonight on Sunday, left-wing host John Oliver capped off a lengthy monologue lobbying Congress to provide assistance to the island with the musical performance.



Thursday’s CBS Evening News featured a segment in which chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook tag-teamed with the White House and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi to attack Republicans for not going along with demands to create $1.9 billion (that could be passed through Congress) to allow the CDC and NIH to fight the Zika virus.



The journalists at CBS This Morning on Wednesday speculated that one reason Speaker of the House Paul Ryan disavowed any interest in the 2016 Republican nomination is because it’s “not worth having.” Talking to reporter Nancy Cordes, co-host Charlie Rose speculated, “Is it possible he thinks this is not a nomination worth having in this political year?” 



Esquire's Charles Pierce unleashed on Paul Ryan on MSNBC's All In on Monday during a panel discussion on a possible presidential bid by the House speaker: "I think he's as ambitious as Satan. I think he doesn't want to go out in the country where he was already deemed not worthy of the vice presidency, and try to run for president. But if they offer him the crown, he would loathe to lay his hands off it. So, yeah, I think he's running."



The House Speaker, the honorable Paul Ryan, recently expressed his hope for a more "confident America." He went on to say "we don't shut people down. If someone has a bad idea, we tell them why our idea is better. We don't insult them into agreeing with us." He spoke of the superiority of persuasion to execration.