MSNBC’s Joy Reid apparently believes that the memory of the American public is so horrendous, that she actually attempted to rewrite the history of the passing of ObamaCare on Wednesday’s All In in an attempt to smear the GOP. “Republicans have been saying for SO LONG that they're going to repeal and replace, repeal and replace,” she exclaimed to Democratic strategist Jess McIntosh, “It's just like a catch phrase but they never had a risk of having to do it because they always had Barack Obama to save them from themselves.”



The women at the View are constantly bashing Donald Trump for what he says but seem to have no filter on what comes out of their own mouths. On Tuesday’s show, the panel complained about House Republicans looking to gut the Office of Congressional Ethics and House Speaker Paul Ryan seemingly going along with it. Co-host Whoopi Goldberg then made a suggestive comment about Ryan and his relationship to the GOP.



The Washington Examiner’s T. Becket Adams exposed on Tuesday morning in a series of tweets the very problem that besets a liberal media obsessed with placing legitimate conservative sites into the sphere of the fake news when a number of journalists chided Speaker of the House Paul Ryan for comments at CPAC 2014 regarding school lunches thanks to a dishonest hatchet job by Time magazine.



CBS’s 60 Minutes scored a sit-down on Sunday with House Speaker Paul Ryan, conducted by host Scott Pelley, in which he sought to corner Ryan from the left on the repeal of ObamaCare supposedly putting millions of Americans at risk for no healthcare and whether or not President-elect Donald Trump says as many “bizarre things” in private as he does when tweeting.



Early Thursday evening during Hardball, a new MSNBC promo highlighted their unabashedly liberal slant with footage from Monday’s All In of host Chris Hayes giggling over a Donald Trump rally in Wisconsin chanting “Paul Ryan sucks” and an on-screen chryon reading “[t]his is a party foul.”



Following the leaked tape of GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump making lewd comments about women over the weekend, members of the Republican Party started to distance themselves. And NBC seemed quite giddy about it as they kicked off NBC Nightly News Monday with “Civil War” emblazoned across the screen. As if he was announcing the latest Marvel blockbuster Anchor Lester Holt declared, “With Donald Trump's fortunes fading over his lewd comments about women, a GOP civil war has broken out.” 



As the country heads into an election where control of both Congress and the White House hangs in the balance, reporter Emmarie Huetteman wrote a “three act” comedy in loosey-goosey style mocking conservatives, for Friday’s New York Times: “What the House Spends Time On, Before Its Recess.” Paul Ryan can't find his agenda, "Democrats are thrilled" at the prospect of being penalized for June's sit-in, and a defeated conservative representative is compared to a "recalcitrant student trashing the principal’s office after he learns he’s been expelled."



During a guest appearance on Tuesday's edition of MSNBC's Morning Joe program, Cokie Roberts -- a political commentator for National Public Radio and ABC News -- hammered people who still support Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as “morally tainted” and an example of “textbook racism.”

Roberts said of the approximately 40 percent of American voters who polls say still support Trump: “I mean, there’s just no question about that. You can’t say ‘He’s a racist and what he says is textbook racism, but I support him because he’s the nominee of my party.’”



Donald Trump has, to borrow a phrase from Barack Obama, changed the trajectory of the GOP, contended Talking Points Memo editor and publisher Marshall in a Thursday post. “The white ethno-nationalist party which Trump has brought out of the shadows and mobilized,” wrote Marshall, “is now and will continue to be the Republican party…This seems like a transformative event.” Even if “committed Trump supporters” constitute only “10% to 20%” of the party, argued Marshall, it doesn’t matter: “If Trumpism were simply a loud and radical faction within the GOP, there would be some comparable faction opposing it…But there's not. In other words, the size of the Trumpite faction within the GOP (and I'd argue it's quite large) is beside the point because it demonstrably rules the GOP.”



The day before Donald Trump reflected on “Second Amendment people” and their response to Hillary Clinton’s taste in judges, he made news with a speech about economics. To The New Republic’s Brian Beutler, the takeaway there was that Trump had “adopted [both] Paul Ryan’s tax policy and the GOP’s gaffe-centered 2012 campaign strategy of misquoting or misrepresenting the Democratic candidate’s words.” Beutler argued that the two were related since Trump, “vulnerable to criticism from Hillary” on tax issues, has taken the offensive by lying about Clinton’s tax proposals -- specifically, by “claim[ing] that she pledged to raise middle-class taxes."



There’s a famous line attributed to Henry Kissinger about the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s: “It's a pity they can't both lose.” Left-wing Washington Monthly blogger David Atkins adapted Kissinger’s quip for his Tuesday post about whether “vicious, ignorant megalomaniac” Donald Trump is “more contemptible” than “steely-eyed devotee of Ayn Rand” Paul Ryan.



As RNC chairman Reince Priebus appeared as a guest on Sunday's Face the Nation, CBS host John Dickerson -- using a comment from GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump about not wanting to be a "puppet" for Republican donors -- asked the RNC chairman if Republicans like Mike Pence, Scott Walker and Paul Ryan are "puppets" for the conservative Koch brothers.