In one of the latest developments regarding the Associated Press article that claims more than half of the people who met with Hillary Clinton while she was secretary of state gave money to the Clinton Foundation, the Democratic presidential candidate's campaign has called on the AP to change the tweet promoting the article.

The initial posting reads: “BREAKING: AP analysis: More than half those who met Clinton as Cabinet secretary gave money to Clinton Foundation,” and Brian Fallon, press secretary for the Clinton campaign, stated: “We have formally requested that AP remove or amend this tweet.”



Until very recently, those of us who follow the routine instances of journalistic malfeasance committed at the Associated Press only thought that its writers are so enamored of the idea of a Hillary Clinton presidency that they simply accept her campaign's spin as the gospel truth and willingly dress it up as "objective news."

That's obviously bad enough. But Monday night, that all changed for the worse — and in the following days, it has became even more obvious. It is now eminently reasonable to believe that the wire service has been proactively involved in real time in advancing and even planning the Clinton campaign's strategies and tactics — essentially serving her as a stenographer, like the Soviet Union's old Pravda.



On Fox News shortly after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's foreign policy speech today, former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton evaluated what the GOP frontrunner had to say about Iran's efforts to develop nuclear weapons.

He also stated the inconvenient truth about the Obama administration's nuclear "deal" with Iran, namely that it puts the jihad-driven, terrorist-funding, death-to-America nation "on a highway to nuclear weapons" — a reality that the Barack Obama-defending press simply won't admit, at least partially because elements of the press, particularly alleged "journalists" at the Associated Press, helped clear the route for that highway:



The Associated Press, although it has apparently removed the primary photo involved from where it was posted last night at its APimages.com web site, is showing no remorse over having published what it has now admitted are five photos of 2016 Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz containing "guns seen on a wall in the background so that it appeared a pistol was pointed at Sen. Cruz’s head."

AP Media Relations Director Paul Colford, in a statement seen at the Politico and Mediaite which he has not mentioned at his Twitter feed and (as far as I can tell) hasn't posted at any official wire service page, wants us to know that they had no bad intentions — so would everyone please leave them alone so they can continue purveying their "unintended" filth? It's hard to have any reaction other than that to Colford's lame and completely unacceptable statement, which follows the jump.



In response to several outlets contending with basis that the Associated Press sat on its knowledge that the United States and Iran were conducting secret diplomatic discussions, the AP's Paul Colford has published a "Back Story" item defending its conduct, claiming that it could not "confirm, to its standards, what had happened." My related NewsBusters post is here.

Breitbart had a related item earlier today. In it, Larry O'Connor posted a tweet from a specific person at another news organization indicating that "both had versions of it independently early & were asked to not publish til end of Iran talks." Barring a better explanation from AP than what readers will see after the jump, the tweet by Laura Rozen at the Washington-based, Middle East-focused Al-Monitor presumptively refutes AP's claim that it didn't have enough information to justify publishing a story (if they didn't, why would the government bother to ask them to not publish?). Colford did not address Rozen's relayed claim, even though his item more than likely went up several hours after O'Connor's Breitbart post and roughly 48 hours after Rozen's tweet (depending on its time zone). Colford's full AP post follows the jump (links and italics are in original):



Apparently, Associated Press Media Relations Director Paul Colford is unaware of the sage advice that when one is in a deep hole, it's best to stop digging.

Shortly after the George Zimmerman verdict, AP reporter Cristina Silva, as noted late last night (at NewsBusters; at BizzyBlog; HT Breitbart.com) tweeted "So We Can All Kill Teenagers Now? Just Checking." A short time ago, Colford sent me an email and posted a comment at my home blog as follows: "Clarification, please: Ms. Silva was a temporary AP staffer who hasn't worked for AP lately. Thanks." All I can say to that, based on what follows, is "OMG."



After the libertine left howled that that the Associated Press decided not to use routinely the word "homophobia," it's not surprising the same people are upset that AP stylebook sultans would rule that "husband" and "wife" should not be used routinely to describe "gay marriages." The Huffington Post apparently can't read. They call this a "ban."

But the real fever swamp is at Gawker, where the radicals imagine that the "bizarre" AP is somehow like segregationists:



Last night (at NewsBusters; at BizzyBlog), yours truly questioned how the Associated Press could have two identically worded stories with different headlines -- "Cache of evidence in shooting, still huge gaps" and "Amid evidence cache in Martin case, questions nag" -- posted at its national site.

This morning, Paul Colford, Director of AP Media Relations posted a comment at BizzyBlog which included a request that I note his communication with me at NewsBusters. Mr. Colford's note and my response follow the jump: