Friday’s New York Times covered the start of the second term of Venezuelan autocrat Nicholas Maduro, but managed to avoid unflattering descriptions like that, in “With Venezuela in Free Fall, Its President Starts New Term." Yet other stories on Friday tossed around the word “autocrat” to complain about President Trump’s embrace of Egypt’s leadership. Also as usual, the Times’ use of the S-word (socialism) was limited and perhaps even positive, even though socialist economics have ravaged oil-rich Venezuela and rendered it a starving basket case.



On the eve of the National Assembly elections of Venezuela in which many observers expect voters to express their extreme dissatisfaction with the the Socialist policies of the ruling Chavistas which have completely ruined the economy of that oil rich nation, The Guardian of the UK has found a villain. A wealthy elite living in a state of priveleged luxury.

A normal person would expect the culprits to be the corrupt Chavistas such as National Assembly president Diosdado Cabello who is estimated to have stolen over 2 billion dollars via corruption or the President of Venezuela Nicolas Maduro who is believed to have pocketed at least a billion dollars by corruption and family drug dealing. In addition, there are the many other wealthy Chavistas who used their power to abscond with billions of dollars more leaving Venezuela an ecomonic basket case. So who does The Guardian writer, Sibylla Brodzinsky, point the accusatory finger at? "Country Club" conservatives while giving the vast corruption of the Chavistas a free pass. I kid you not. Here is Brodzinsky casting this group in cartoon caricature terms:



Sean Penn is taking a page out of President Barack Obama's playbook but twisting it to his own socialist-friendly liking. Obama has gotten plenty of mileage for blaming his predecessor for the country's woes.

Now, Penn is blaming Venezuelan president Nicolas Maduro's problems on what the leader inherited from his predecessor--Hugo Chavez. Only Penn doesn't blame his late friend at all, preferring to spin a yarn about paranoia and relationships meant to excuse the late leader from guilt.