Raining down hard on Colin Kaepernick and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, the New York Post's Phil Mushnick is bucking the trend by media liberals to patronize the radical social justice warrior who "gamed" the NFL leader. Mushnick stiff-arms Goodell and Kaepernick for essentially spoiling the pro football experience for so many Americans.



Monday was the first chance for ESPN First Take debaters Stephen A. Smith and Max Kellerman to weigh in on Friday's NFL settlement with former player Colin Kaepernick, who, along with Eric Reid, had sued on the grounds of collusion to keep them out of the league for kneeling. Both First Take commentators have consistently defended Kaepernick's social justice cause, but on Monday Kellerman said Kaepernick can claim victory and Smith disputed that.



Media reactions to Friday's settlement by the NFL on the collusion suit brought by Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid are pouring in. The former NFL player Kaepernick and the current player Reid are expected to reap a windfall in exchange for ending their attempt to prove the league owners colluded with one another to keep them out of the NFL. The most outrageous reaction came from SB Nation's Harry Lyles Jr., who saw a racist element in the settlement that other media missed.



The long legal battle between the NFL and Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid ended today with a settlement. Kaepernick is the former San Francisco quarterback who ignited a firestorm of controversy in 2016 when he began sitting and kneeling during the national anthem. Teammate Eric Reid quickly joined his protest of racial inequality and police brutality, and additional NFL players knelt, too. Both men filed collusion grievances against the NFL, resulting in many months of depositions. Media sentiment has overwhelming favored the social justice warriors and accused the NFL of blackballing them.



Appearing on Cuomo Prime Time with host Chris Cuomo Wednesday, CNN's Don Lemon called the Wisconsin Republican lawmakers' objection to Colin Kaepernick's name on a Black History Month resolution "BS." Lemon also criticized former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice (who was included in the resolution) for "weapons of mass destruction" and accused President Donald Trump of twisting Kaepernick's protest narrative.



Raising a red herring, Detroit Free Press columnist Shawn Windsor bemoans that if woman-beaters like Kareem Hunt are allowed to play in the NFL, then Colin Kaepernick should be allowed to play, too. The argument isn't if a woman-beater can play, then why not Kaepernick? The better point that Windsor badly misses is no owner has an obligation to employ any athlete who has crossed a line of incivility.



In the days leading up to last week's Super Bowl 53, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and other league leaders toured Atlanta's historic civil rights locations and highlighted the legacy of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King. Then undid all the goodwill by degrading women and Dr. King's legacy during the halftime show. New York Post sports columnist Phil Mushnick was not about to let the NFL get away with its Super Bowl hypocrisy either.



Former U.S. Olympic athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos shocked with black power salutes at the 1968 Summer Games in Mexico City. They were sent home in disgrace then, but now that the media has a love affair with social justice warriors like Colin Kaepernick, Smith and Carlos are treated like heroes and adorned with honors by the progressive, social justice crowd. The Golden State Warriors saluted Smith during a game Wednesday, and visiting San Antonio Coach Gregg Popovich predicted that Kaepernick, too, will become greatly admired.



In his NBA playing days, the volatile Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (KAJ) was well known for his unstoppable skyhook shot and, dubiously, for sucker punching opponents and basket supports when he got angry. Now he verbally punches President Donald Trump and NFL owners, while launching "sky hooks" for social justice in hard-hitting commentaries for the Hollywood Reporter and The Guardian. In his most recent verbal knockout punch, for The Guardian, he asks if there is any room left for social conscience amidst the commercial giant known as the Super Bowl.



Suppose I declare that I am a king. Should you be required to address me as “Your Majesty”? You say, “Williams, that's lunacy! You can't prove such nonsense.” You're wrong. It's proved by my declaration. It's no different from a person born with XY chromosomes declaring that he is a woman. The XY sex determination system is the sex determination system found in humans and most other mammals. Females typically have two of the same kind of sex chromosome (XX) and are called the homogametic sex. Males typically have two different kinds of sex chromosomes (XY) and are called the heterogametic sex. 



The self-appointed "Justice Journalist" of the New York Daily News' sports staff, Chuck Modiano, went ballistic about white privilege in the NFL. While mentioning the white race 29 times in less than flattering terms, he claims the so-called black-balling of Colin Kaepernick is due to economic racism, and says the majority of NFL owners are incompetent Trumpian clones who are selling whiteness to a white fan base.



The far-left’s descent into madness often involves violent spasms of hate and ugliness, and in Donald Trump’s America even the most celebrated pastimes aren’t spared from being coated in a heavy layer of scorned leftist slime. Case in point — rabid progressives’ reaction to the Patriots' Super Bowl victory. Lefty sports writer Drew Magary composed a contemptuous piece skewering “all the terrible people” who are “happy today. Fuck them, fuck the Patriots, and fuck all the terrible people right off the side of the earth.”