An outbreak in the culture wars is erupting in Tennessee, uniting left-stream media, LGBT pressure groups and the NFL's Tennessee Titans, in addition to other corporate interests, against a conservative legislature trying to pass legislation would ensure that occupants of public restrooms use the one that correspondents with their physical gender. Legislation would also safeguard faith-based adoption agencies from discrimination charges for refusing to allow children to be adopted by same-sex couples. Naturally, biased media reports characterized the bills as "anti-LGBT."



For the liberal media, President Donald Trump's congratulatory tweet to a white college football player drafted into the NFL was too good to be true. The African-American quarterback drafted No. 1 did not get a social media shout-out from the president, offering further "confirmation" of the ongoing Trump-as-racist media narrative.



It could have passed for an episode of Focus on the Family. The discussion centered on family, faith and the tragic results of fatherlessness. To the contrary, this was a recent episode of Fox Sports 1's Speak For Yourself program and a discussion on, "What can we do to reduce violence in the black community?" A question like that usually draws the knee-jerk poverty-racism-police brutality-joblessness charges from progressives and Black Lives Matter supporters.



Virtually every time a starting NFL quarterback gets injured or traded, the Kaepernick eruptions begin anew with his adoring media pack. You can set your clock to it. The Dolphins traded long-time starting QB Ryan Tannehill to Tennessee a few days ago, and ... sure enough, Kaepernick-loving media start chirping about how Miami is the ideal place for the America-hating social justice warrior to make his grand re-entrance into the National Football League.



Concluding an 11-part series on what it would change in sports, USA Today is calling for an end to the playing of the national anthem at sporting events. Columnist Nancy Armour called the pregame renditions of the Star Spangled Banner a "lazy excuse for patriotism" and a "faux display of national pride better suited for countries run by dictators or despots."



NFL social justice warrior (SJW) Michael Bennett's impending trade to the New England Patriots renewed the debate Tuesday over national anthem protests. The former Seahawk, soon-to-be former Eagle and outspoken SJW told the Patriots he will remain in the locker room during the playing of the Star Spangled Banner. This prompted a debate between ESPN First Take's Stephen A. Smith and Max Kellerman on whether or not this is a big deal.



Jerry Thornton is a New England Patriots' beat writer for the Barstool Sports blog and claims to be a staunch defender of quarterback Tom Brady, Coach Bill Belichick and "all things Patriots." The blog has been accused of sexual harassment and misogyny, so it's not surprising that Thornton would excuse away the recent arrest of team owner Robert Kraft on the charge of soliciting sex. Thornton's fall guy is team chaplain Jack Easterby, who is reportedly leaving the team because of the owner's behavior.



Raining down hard on Colin Kaepernick and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, the New York Post's Phil Mushnick is bucking the trend by media liberals to patronize the radical social justice warrior who "gamed" the NFL leader. Mushnick stiff-arms Goodell and Kaepernick for essentially spoiling the pro football experience for so many Americans.



Monday was the first chance for ESPN First Take debaters Stephen A. Smith and Max Kellerman to weigh in on Friday's NFL settlement with former player Colin Kaepernick, who, along with Eric Reid, had sued on the grounds of collusion to keep them out of the league for kneeling. Both First Take commentators have consistently defended Kaepernick's social justice cause, but on Monday Kellerman said Kaepernick can claim victory and Smith disputed that.



Media reactions to Friday's settlement by the NFL on the collusion suit brought by Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid are pouring in. The former NFL player Kaepernick and the current player Reid are expected to reap a windfall in exchange for ending their attempt to prove the league owners colluded with one another to keep them out of the NFL. The most outrageous reaction came from SB Nation's Harry Lyles Jr., who saw a racist element in the settlement that other media missed.



The long legal battle between the NFL and Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid ended today with a settlement. Kaepernick is the former San Francisco quarterback who ignited a firestorm of controversy in 2016 when he began sitting and kneeling during the national anthem. Teammate Eric Reid quickly joined his protest of racial inequality and police brutality, and additional NFL players knelt, too. Both men filed collusion grievances against the NFL, resulting in many months of depositions. Media sentiment has overwhelming favored the social justice warriors and accused the NFL of blackballing them.



Appearing on Cuomo Prime Time with host Chris Cuomo Wednesday, CNN's Don Lemon called the Wisconsin Republican lawmakers' objection to Colin Kaepernick's name on a Black History Month resolution "BS." Lemon also criticized former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice (who was included in the resolution) for "weapons of mass destruction" and accused President Donald Trump of twisting Kaepernick's protest narrative.