The boycott brigade is back and ready for action. Numerous Twitter users vowed to cancel their Neflix subscriptions this week. Why? The streaming giant cinched a deal with President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama.



Despite multiple criticisms for its glorification of suicide, Netflix’s high school drama 13 Reasons Why returned with a brand-new season on May 18. Considering the first season wrapped up everything that happened in the 2007 Jay Asher young adult book it’s based on, everyone’s first question for the show is where it can possibly go next. Rest assured that even without a looming suicide, the series still manages to be just as graphic, ignorant, and annoying as ever.



On Tuesday, all three network morning shows were gleeful over the news that Barack and Michelle Obama had signed a deal with Netflix to create original content for the online streaming service. Hosts happily touted “a lot of people very excited” about the announcement and cheered that the former president and first lady “got paid,” with the agreement rumored to be worth tens of millions of dollars. Missing from much of the adulation, except for a brief mention on NBC, was the fact that the Netflix executive in charge of content was a major Obama campaign donor.



Former President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, have signed an extensive contract to create new movies and television shows for Netflix. That agreement potentially includes scripted and unscripted programs, documentaries and feature films. Of course, the Monday announcement came as no surprise to anyone familiar with the connection between the pay-cable channel and the former Democratic occupants of the White House, along with Obama Administration officials and entertainment executives who have supported the family in the past.



How’s this for a career enhancing PR stunt? Stand up comedian Maria Bamford says she’s really unsettled by the Trump Administration’s foreign policy as of late, so much so that she has filed a restraining order against the president himself.



It seems that 2018 is the year for John Hughes-esque teen dramedies to make a come back. This time with the full force of LGBT appeal. Hoping to gain a following with fans of the film, “Love, Simon,” Netflix has announced a new gay teen romantic comedy for it’s streaming service that will appear in June, just in time for the nation’s major Pride festivities.



In Friday’s episode of David Letterman’s Netflix Series, My Next Guest Needs no Introduction, “I Had a Paper Route Too,” Letterman kept with tradition and slipped in a question about President Trump with only fifteen minutes left in the hour-long interview. This week’s guest was rapper Jay-Z, a vocal Trump hater. So when Letterman jokingly asserted, “I’m beginning to lose hope in the Trump administration,” he knew he’d get a favorable response from both Jay-Z and the audience. Reminiscent of Hilary Clinton’s “basket of deplorables” comment, Jay-Z remarks, “He’s [Trump] bringing out an ugly side of America that we wanted to believe was gone. And it’s still here and we’ve still got to deal with it."



The Obama administration is blessedly just a memory, but the entertainment industry is banking that progressives will want to revisit those golden years, one TV episode at a time. First it was CBS, “ordering a pilot for Main Justice, a show based on the life of former attorney general Eric Holder.” Alas, it’s not a prison drama. Heck, it won’t even be grounded in reality, since “Holder is also serving as executive producer.”



David Letterman’s Netflix series, My Next Guest Needs no Introduction, hosted Pakistani education activist Malala Yousafzai on Friday’s episode, “You Know, She has a Nobel Peace Prize.” But while Malala discussed the importance of education for women, with less than 12 minutes left in the interview, Letterman uses his opportunity to interview the youngest Nobel Prize laureate to pick fun at President Trump.



Netflix’s Seven Seconds can be summed up by a drunken slur uttered during its fifth episode: “You’re all racist a**holes. Every one of you cops.” And when it comes to this show, that statement is correct. Seven Seconds, released February 23, portrays police officers and the justice system as incredibly racist and apathetic. The show revolves around the hit-and-run death of Brenton Butler, a 15-year-old black kid, at the hands of police officer Peter Jablonski (Beau Knapp) and three other white police officers in New Jersey. Although the collision is an accident, the police officers decide to flee the scene, believing the boy to be dead. Brenton is found alive 12 hours later and taken to the hospital, where he eventually dies. An investigation and trial ensue, to the dismay of all the police officers.



The entertainment world has readied the battlefield for the resistance with scripted and unscripted shows.



In an hour long, mind-numbing interview, David Letterman interviews former President Obama for the first episode of his 6-episode Netflix original series, My Next Guest Needs no Introduction. The January 12 debut episode concludes with a heartfelt message from the 70-year-old Letterman to the 44th president: “You are the first president I truly and fully respect.” In the episode, titled “It’s a Whole New Ball Game Now,” Letterman discusses the “palpable sadness” he endured at the end of Obama’s presidency. Throughout the episode, Letterman makes various jokes acting as if Obama is still the president. At one point he mentions that Obama’s answer to a question “just makes me so happy you’re still president.” Later he fantasizes about Obama returning to the Oval Office after the interview. Obama cutely dashes Letterman’s hopes by explaining that if the Constitution didn’t prevent him from running again, his wife would.