In his daily Axios AM newsletter -- widely shared among the top political reporters and editors in New York and Washington -- former Politico reporter Mike Allen takes the racism claims against Trump to a new level on Wednesday, calling it premeditated. The newsletter begins with the headline "1 big thing: Trump's premeditated racism."



The "mainstream" media site Axios is publicizing a new poll that an unnamed Democratic group did of 1,000 swing voters, specifically white voters with less than two years of college. The pollsters asked specifically about radical new members of Congress, and what they found was shocking. 



Liberals had a "scary thought" when Donald Trump Jr. said he'd love to see Silicon Valley conservatives "start" a new social media platform. Don Jr. said if that were to happen he'd "help promote the platform and be all over that." Mike Allen of Axios confessed that idea scared him, writing, "Imagine tribal news delivered via tribal pipes. And, as one mischievous Trump adviser told us, imagine the president moving his Twitter show to that network." 



Axios is yet another leftist website which promised "vital, trustworthy news and analysis" with "no bias" and "no nonsense" but has subsequently descended into parody. Saturday, Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei, two of the site's founders, posted "The Public Case Against Trump," allegedly a list of "known knowns" about "a damning tale that would sink most leaders." It's a colossal example of fake news.



Political insiders who subscribe to former New York Times and Politico reporter Mike Allen's morning e-mail newsletter -- Axios AM -- might realize it's not really a "newsletter." It's more like a "Talking Points Memo," and the talking points are reliably Democratic in tone. Allen's Friday edition previewed the Nunes memo release under the headline "1 Big Thing: The memo's price." Team Axios found anonymous White House aides who think the president is screwing up, who "recognize their could be a high cost" to Trump's decision to allow the memo's release.



Jim VandeHei, the former Washington Post reporter and co-founder of Politico, inspired a "Special Report" to Axios.com email subscribers headlined "How American politics went insane, in 6 steps.” That was the cleaned-up version. Inside the e-mail it was how politics went “bat [guano] crazy.” Mike Allen, his Axios co-founder, huffed and puffed that “ There are lots of reasons American politics went off the rails, but his VandeHei has proclaimed “six seminal events” caused our current insanity.



Being interviewed by Axios Executive Editor Mike Allen at the Newseum in Washington D.C. Thursday morning, Facebook’s Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg criticized social media rival Twitter for censoring an ad from Tennessee Congresswoman Marsh Blackburn announcing her Senate campaign.
 



Paul Bedard at the Washington Examiner underlined how the media turned out to be wrong again -- projecting that chief of staff Reince Priebus would be bounced from the White House. Bedard cited a June Politico report headlined "Trump gives Priebus until July 4th to clean up White House," noting "That story was picked up by dozens of media outlets."



The broadcast networks morning and evening newscasts, along with the cable news networks, have largely ignored the Tuesday report from Axios's Mike Allen that Hillary Clinton's campaign team blames President Obama for her loss in the 2016 election. Charlie Rose mentioned the revelation in passing on Thursday's CBS This Morning: "You have reports, for example, that the Hillary campaign thought it began with President Obama not doing enough in terms of the Russian hacking."



For a liberal media that bemoans the idea of businesses and corporations being considered “people” post-Citizens United, BuzzFeed decided that they would cancel the Republican National Committee’s (RNC) advertising for their site due to Donald Trump’s candidacy threatening “the freedoms of our employees in the United States and around the world.”

 



This hasn't been a good week for Politico's Mike Allen. On Monday he apologized for email that had been revealed in which he promised Hillary Clinton's PR operative Phillippe Reines two years ago that he would submit questions in advance that he would ask Chelsea Clinton.  Today, Mike Allen again apologized for drawing the wrath of Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel for revealing his family vacation plans to visit Cuba. The text of the exchange is quite tense but one must watch the video below to appreciate the absolute fury of Emanuel.



On Friday, Glenn Kessler at the Washington Post (HT Hot Air) gave "Four Pinocchios" (i.e., a "Whopper") to a statement President Barack Obama made about Senate Republicans' filibuster track record on Wednesday in a speech at a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee dinner in Los Angeles.

In the process, Kessler essentially delivered a rebuke to reporters who cover Obama. Every one of them should have recognized that his DCCC claim that "since 2007, they (Republicans) have filibustered about 500 pieces of legislation that would help the middle class" is false. For it to be true, GOP senators would have had to average 68 filibusters per year only of middle-class relevant bills for the past 7-1/3 years. With the Senate being in session an average of just under 112 days per year during the time involved, that' an impossible frequency of more than one every other day. Excerpts from Kessler's critique follow the jump (links are in original; bolds are mine):