There is no doubt that Freeform’s The Fosters spin-off Good Trouble is woke. From gay relationships and pay inequity to the death of a young black man at the hands of a white policeman, Tuesday night's premiere checked all the boxes and announced Season Two is chock-full of wokeness.



ABC’s Scandal will be finished at the end of its seventh season. Here’s hoping the door doesn’t hit this morally bankrupt ABC trash on the way out. Many Americans will remember the show for its flagrant pushing of the envelope when it came to excoriating conservative principles, and pushing moral themes that were, at the very least, avant-garde. Still, what can you expect from a TV show named Scandal, that also happens to air on the unapologetically liberal ABC network?

 


In what could only be described as one of the most cringe-worthy and disrespectful interview to date, Fox News Channel host Martha MacCallum took on a petulant filmmaker in Jason Pollock and his “documentary” on the murder of Michael Brown during Monday night’s First 100 Days.



The outcome of the Michael Brown saga in Ferguson, Missouri, which began in August 2014, reached a climax in November 2014 when a grand jury did not indict police officer Darren Wilson, and ended with a whimper in March 2015 when the Justice Department saw no basis for bringing civil rights charges, infuriated the left. So it seemed inevitable that a conspiracy theory would emerge attempting to rehabilitate Brown's reputation while planting doubt about the circumstances leading to his death — and one just has.



Gateway Pundit dubbed the Democratic National Convention's program Tuesday evening as "Criminal Appreciation Night." Site proprietor Jim Hoft certainly has a point. The party officially nominated a candidate for the highest office in the land who committed acknowledged and admitted criminal acts, but whom the FBI and the intensely politicized Justice Department chose not to prosecute. A former president who was impeached over admitted perjury, also known as a crime, was also a featured speaker.

Tuesday night's program also included an appearance by several representatives of "Mothers of the Movement." Here, as seen at the Dayton Daily News, is how Richard Thompson of Rare.us, a Cox Media-owned web operation, began his coverage of the "Mothers" appearance:



If we're to believe the pose struck by five Associated Press reporters who contributed to a Sunday afternoon story on the topic, the spike in violent crime in the U.S. during the past nearly two years apparently needs its own episode of the old Unsolved Mysteries TV series.

"Experts can't point to a single reason" for the rise. The increase "is stumping law enforcement officials." FBI Director James Comey says, "I don't know what the answer is." But don't worry, say the AP reporters, because "the jump isn't enough to suggest there's a trend," and "it's a far cry from the more notorious early 1990s." The obvious genuine answer, the one which people who don't have blinders on clearly recognize, known as the "Ferguson effect," got scant notice, and wasn't directly named. It's almost as if the wire service has a Stylebook rule against using the term — and especially against recognizing the effect's legitimacy.



Along with addressing her meeting with Donald Trump earlier in the day, Kelly File host Megyn Kelly began Wednesday’s show by clashing with MSNBC host/liberal activist Reverend Al Sharpton over what transpired in Ferguson, Missouri to the point that Sharpton rudely told Kelly to “calm down.”



Those in the press who have insisted that the "Ferguson effect" is an urban legend will have a hard time explaining why the two cities with the most potential to be affected by this supposedly mythical phenomenon now have murder rates among the top 20 in the entire world.

St. Louis, Missouri, next door to Ferguson, where a leftist-"inspired" campaign of "protests," civil disorder and rioting began in August 2014, came in at Number 15, with a rate of 59 murders per 100,000 residents. The city's 188 murders in 2015 were up from 159 in 2014 and 120 in 2013. Baltimore, Maryland, where Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake infamously admitted in April 2015, as public safety was deteriorating in her city, that "we also gave those who wished to destroy space to do that," was Number 19, with 344 murders (a rate of 55 per 100,000).



One year ago this Sunday, 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot during a struggle with then police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri. Immediately after Brown was killed, protests and misinformation spread throughout Ferguson and across America, but not without the media’s help. Brown’s friend claimed Brown had his hands up and was facing away from Wilson when Wilson shot and killed him.

“Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” became a common crowd chant, a hashtag, and a national catch-phrase that held no credibility but still was repeated by the media that knew better.



A white artist is making waves in the media for creating a reenactment of Michael Brown’s death as an art exhibit in Chicago.

The exhibit opens on the heels of a federal judge dismissing four counts of wrongful-death lawsuits filed by Brown’s parents. More are still being filed, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.



Aamer Madhani at USA Today took the easy way out on Friday in covering the sharp increases in murders in many U.S. cities during the first half of this year.

He quoted Milwaukee's police chief bemoaning "absurdly weak" gun laws. He noted that "the increased violence is disproportionately impacting poor and predominantly African-American and Latino neighborhoods." He found a university prof to allege that there's a lack of resources to "fund a proactive law enforcement." What rubbish. The fact is that the "broken windows" approach to law enforcement, the "proactive law enforcement" initiative pioneered in New York City under Mayor Rudy Giuliani in the 1990s which made New York one of the safest cities in America, is being systematically discredited by the left and abandoned by many police departments, with all too predictable results.



In a "completely unexpected" (no, not really) development, Dorian Johnson, the person who was with Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri when Brown was killed by police officer Darren Wilson, has been arrested. I know, I know, it's a real shock to learn that the guy who completely fabricated the "hands up, don't shoot" lie and, along with Brown, "stole a box of cigars" from a store before their fateful encounter with Wilson could possibly have broken the law.

The Associated Press has written a story on the arrest. What's really odd, at least based on searches on Johnson's first name, is that the story isn't posted at the wire service's main national site or at its "Big Story" site.