Now that the midterm elections of 2018 are behind us, CNN has made an interesting choice when hiring a new political commentator: Andrew Gillum, the former mayor of Tallahassee who lost a tight race for Florida governor to Republican Ron DeSantis in November. The selection is made all the more curious since the Florida Commission on Ethics has found Gillum as having "probable cause" regarding five counts of ethics violations for allegedly accepting gifts while traveling with lobbyists. That investigation is said to be “moving forward.”



Friday at the Hot Topics table, the hosts of The View argued with Utah Republican, Rep. Mia Love, pressuring her to call President Trump a racist, after he blamed her critical stance towards him as the reason why she lost to her Democrat challenger in the midterm elections. Love didn’t fold under the pressure from the liberal hosts, instead calling out Democrats for targeting her because she is a black, female Republican.



On Tuesday and Wednesday, Andrea Mitchell oddly claimed that President Donald Trump was using a "racial dog whistle" against Mississippi Democratic Senate nominee Mike Espy as the MSNBC host discussed Trump commenting that Espy's far-left politics do not "fit in" with his strongly conservative home state.



Are black Republicans Sen. Tim Scott and Reps. Mia Love and Will Hurd on the wrong side of the aisle? In a sense, they are, according to Jamelle Bouie, who argued in a Sunday piece that the conservatism central to the GOP is “fundamentally at odds with America’s people of color.” Bouie wrote that “no matter the temperamental affinities that might exist between some nonwhites and the Republican Party, attempts to bring them into the fold inevitably run up against a key reality: that movement conservatism—the starve-the-beast, libertarian mode that dominates contemporary Republican politics—is a white ideology."



The major broadcast networks refused to take notice on Thursday night of plans by President Obama and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to force the diversification of American neighborhoods and particularly those mainly consisting of wealthy Americans. With the “big three” of ABC, CBS, and NBC on the sidelines, the FNC's pecial Report offered a full segment on the regulations that host Bret Baier noted has Republicans “charging that President Obama wants control over who lives in your neighborhood and [that] he’s using the power of the purse strings to pursue it.”



Denise Oliver-Velez argues that Love is merely “another brown face to shove in front of the cameras” as supposed proof that the Republican party cares about non-white people, but “she certainly isn't going to convince any black folks who aren't Teapublican patsies already.”



The editors of The Huffington Post apparently do not feel awkward about putting headline above a black Republican woman with the words “She looks black, but.....” She “looks” black? The full headline was “She Looks Black, but Her Politics Are Red: What Mia Love's Victory Means for the Face of the GOP.”

Darron Smith, Ph. D, who “looks black,” but writes for the very white Arianna Huffington, wondered “How does a black, female conservative and Latter-day Saint manage to negotiate so many foreboding white contexts?” Her election in a largely white district still represents a victory for "white privilege." She apparently suffers from a “apparent Stockholm syndrome of black Mormons" and makes “an unholy compromise” in avoiding any racial or gender advocacy:



Mia Love, who won a congressional seat on Tuesday representing Utah’s 4th district, last year took part in the Media Research Center’s annual “DisHonors Awards” where we ridicule left wing journalists. On behalf of MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry she accepted, in jest, the “Dan Rather Memorial Award for the Stupidest Analysis.”



On Friday's CNN Newsroom, Brooke Baldwin played up the apparent similarity between Senator-elect Joni Ernst's laugh and that of Cruella De Vil, the antagonist from Disney's 101 Dalmations. Baldwin aired a short segment on Ernst and two newly-elected Republican women in Congress. She ended the part about the Iowa politician with her comparison: "Don't forget about that laugh. Some people call it contagious; other people have likened it to this." The anchor then twice played clips of Ernst laughing at her victory rally, followed by De Vil's evil cackle.



On Tuesday, former Saratoga Springs, Utah mayor Mia Love become the first black Republican woman in Congress.

Politico, overdoing its apparent grief at Tuesday's national results, is acting as if Love won in a walkaway. Alex Isenstadt's pity party post-election report on the Democrats' substantial House losses claimed that Love's was a seat "Democrats conceded long before Election Day." The results, and the money she had to spend to win, indicate otherwise.



On Wednesday morning's edition of This Hour on the Cable News Network, co-hosts John Berman and Michaela Pereira spoke with Mia Love, the Utah Republican who became the party's first black woman to win a seat in the House of Representatives as part of the midterm elections on Tuesday. During the interview, Love asserted that race and gender “had nothing to do with” her victory over Democrat Doug Owens. Instead, she asserted that voters in the Beehive State “want to make sure that they are electing people who are honest and who have integrity, who can be able to go out and actually make sure that we represent the values that they hold dear.”">the party's first black woman to win a seat in the House of Representatives as part of the midterm elections on Tuesday.



So here's the "logic" Michelle Price at the Associated Press relayed from Democratic circles in Utah in her Tuesday report on eight-term Democratic Congressman Jim Matheson's decision to leave Congress: He would have had a tough time defeating Mia Love in next year's congressional race rematch, but he's now in a better position to take on an incumbent Republican in a 2016 statewide race — either U.S. Senator Mike Lee or Governor Gary Herbert.

Price either chose not to find or couldn't find a Republican to comment on Matheson's statewide prospects, nor could she locate anyone close to Matheson to comment on whether or not the congressman even has any statewide ambitions. Thus, she spent several paragraphs on mere speculation. Excerpts follow the jump (bolds are mine):