Michelle Alexander, a new New York Times columnist, was given front page Sunday Review real estate for her 2,300-word screed offensively linking civil rights hero Martin Luther King Jr. to the Palestinian cause against Israel, in “Time to Break the Silence on Palestine -- Martin Luther King Jr. spoke bravely on Vietnam. We must do the same to meet this moral challenge.” But two sites that cover media bias against Israel knocked down Alexander's myths and distortions.



2017 was a year of incredible change and tension in the world of the liberal media. Whether it was the departure of their beloved Barack Obama, the contentious White House press briefings, media failures, or journalists fired over sexual misconduct allegations, the liberal media are almost definitely looking forward to 2018. Just as I did with 2016, check out the top ten most-read NewsBusters blogs from 2017.



On Monday afternoon, reporters stationed inside Trump Tower begged Martin Luther King III to attack President-elect Trump over tweets concerning Democratic Congressman John Lewis (Ga.) following a meeting on the day honoring King’s father, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.



On the Friday, June 21, PoliticsNation on MSNBC, host Al Sharpton brought up former President Ronald Reagan giving a speech in 1980 near the town of Philadelphia, Mississippi, where three civil rights activists were famously murdered in 1963.

Referring to then-candidate Reagan's first speech after the Republican convention which he delivered at the Neshoba County Fair a few miles from Philadelphia, Sharpton incorrectly claimed Philadelphia was where Reagan "announced he was running for President" as the MSNBC host related:



CNN stoked fears that new voter ID laws might hearken back to the days of Jim Crow. Monday marked the anniversary of the Voting Rights Act, and CNN's Zoraida Sambolin used that to discuss whether the new laws might "suppress the minority vote."

"Do you think that having an African-American president is actually reigniting some of these old prejudices?" she asked former Ambassador Andrew Young who helped draft the 1965 Voting Rights Act.