The New York Times is what Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg considers “good, trustworthy” journalism. During an interview with Vox's Ezra Klein, Zuckerberg spoke about attempts by Facebook to crack down on what is deemed “fake news.” Zuckerberg laid out three kinds of fake news: spammers, state actors, and legitimate news sources that are “speaking their truth” although they may have “varying levels of accuracy or trustworthiness.”

 


Android users who installed Facebook’s Messenger app on their devices may have had their call and text histories logged for approximately two years, according to a report in Ars Technica.

Ars Technica reported that the issue occurred when certain Android users downloaded Messenger in 2015. Apparently, Facebook started chronicling information related to phone calls and text messages made from their Android devices. Users discovered the data use after they downloaded an archive of their Facebook account data.



Although he once called himself an atheist, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg now recognizes the importance of religion. 



Here's an update from the “fake news” front: The Associated Press published an unbylined “Fact Check” of what anyone with an ounce of sense could see is a satirical article published almost 15 months ago.

That’s only the start. PolitiFact also “fact-checked” a December 23, 2016 version it knew was of that same 15 month-old item and gave it a “Pants on Fire" rating. What in the name of Mark Zuckerberg is going on?



On Sunday's AM Joy on MSNBC, during a discussion of "fake news" and Facebook's plans to screen news with fact checkers, host Joy Reid not only wrongly claimed that MRC founder Brent Bozell was "conceding" that "a lot of the things that are put out on the right aren't real" by pressing Facebook over how they would factcheck fairly, but panel member and former CNN president Jon Klein declared that it was "frightening" that over the past 30 years, right-wing media have caused people to distrust "mainstream news organizations."



Following Facebook’s announcement that it would start monitoring and flagging fake news stories on the social media platform, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell issued the following statement:



Eager to seize on anything that could explain away Donald Trump’s victory, on Monday, all three network morning shows promoted the left’s latest excuse that false stories being shared on Facebook tilted the election in the President-Elect’s favor.



In sectors of society known for their distinctive liberal bent – such as Silicon Valley and the LGBT community – Trump supporters inexplicably throw a wrench in the works. Alienated and reviled, these folks test the professed tolerance of their liberal compatriots. 



Shorter version of Brian Feldman’s Wednesday article: Sure, Mark Zuckerberg’s a genius, but he still hasn’t come up with a foolproof way to keep Facebook from promoting right-wing propaganda. “Facebook’s problem isn’t that it suppresses ‘conservative news’ or allows ‘fake news,’” wrote Feldman. “It’s that those two categories are increasingly indistinguishable.”



CBS This Morning took a strange turn during its interview with Chaos Monkeys author Antonio Martinez. Martinez, who publically compared Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to "Fidel Castro", led co-host Gayle King to ask Martinez "is that a compliment?"



On Thursday, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell, following a meeting the previous day between some of the nation's top conservative leaders and company officials at Facebook, including CEO Mark Zuckerberg, "told Fox Business Network’s Neil Cavuto ... that he 'left encouraged' that the site wants to fix the 'erosion of trust' set forth by allegations of censoring conservative news topics."

An incident the previous week confirmed that Zuckerberg and Facebook have a genuine and serious credibility problem on their hands, as the site's "Trending Topics" monitors characterized a well-known actress's shout-out for the wonderful work done by a DC-area pregnancy and parenthood center as an "anti-abortion message."



In his first television appearance since the highly-anticipated meeting on Wednesday between Facebook and the nation’s top conservative leaders, Media Research Center President Brent Bozell told Fox Business Network’s Neil Cavuto Thursday afternoon that he “left encouraged” that the site wants to fix the “erosion of trust” set forth by allegations of censoring conservative news topics.